Posts Tagged ‘Windows’

Thank you all for such a great Ludum Dare!

Posted by (twitter: @TheFish523)
Monday, January 2nd, 2017 3:10 pm

I gotta say this Ludum has been one of the best so far for me. (Even though it’s only my second one) Alot of people played my game compared to my last game (Seriously like 6 times as many people). I’ve learned alot from this jam. And I appreciate the mountain of feedback you guys have given me.  I’ve had 3 YouTubers play my game and even some streamers.

Two things really stood out.

1: How motivated you can get when there’s 3 hours left in the jam (Seriously I got more content in those 3 hours than I did the first day).

2: The community.

What do I mean by community? Well, what do ya think? The out-pour of feedback, and the downloads and ratings adding up everyday, I even got a guy on twitter who said I inspired him to participate in the next jam! it’s just a fantastic feeling.

Overall, I think 2017 is gonna be a great year for game development. You all ignited a fire of passion inside me, and Intend to use it. Again, thank you all so much, and I hope to see you in the next JAM!

 

Cheers,

FisherG.

 

Cute

 

PS: IF you want to play my game, you can find it here

Ayup, Cute

 

I made A lil’ Christmas Update for my game. (4 days late to say this)

Its really cute and gives the game a BIG BUTTLOAD OF NEW FEATURES!!!

Including: – A REALLY SUPER RAD SNOW EFFECT. – A REALLY RAD SUPER SANTA HAT;

 

OH MY JEE WIZ THATS ALOT OF STUFF!!! With all this content, you’ll be playing for hours! Why not check it out here!

 

 

 

sarcasm is best.. uh.. ism.

Postmortem Time!

Posted by
Friday, December 23rd, 2016 1:40 pm

title

Postmortem

DONE

Here is the (likely incredibly dull) story of how I made my Compo entry, One Room HotelAs a bonus I also did some stuff with the CSS of the post, hopefully that works out when it gets to the front page.

theme announcement

When I heard the theme, I was not happy. I felt like I had no ideas for the theme, and that it was far too limiting.

Then I realized I had voted for it 😛

My brainstorming process is simple: come up with ideas for the given theme, then come up with themes related to the given theme, then brainstorm based on those. I find doing this is very helpful, as it forces you to look at the theme in different ways, rather than mentally getting stuck on a few ideas. I ended up writing down the idea I was going to use in the section headed “One Room at A Time.”

The idea, as written, was very unclear:

Action Hotel Management Rhythm Game

I  worked up the design of my game based on this, and it went through a few iterations.

  • In the first iteration, you controlled a room in a two story hotel, and needed to pick people up as they walked through to bring them to another side. The idea didn’t really make much sense, so I scrapped it.
  • The second idea was not related to the theme very much at all (it was closer to the “One Room at A Time” the original concept was written under.) You needed to place and remove rooms to optimize your hotel. I realized this did not fit the theme, and would not be very fun, and scrapped it.
  • The third iteration was the one I kept, where you need to carry people around in order to get them where they want to go quickly.

The inspiration for the game actually came from Hot Wheels Drive Through Dilemma, a time management flash game I played a long time ago. I was also thinking about the game SimTower, an inspiration which a couple of people seem to have picked up on.

After I had my full idea, it was time to start work.


starting work

One issue that has been common to every Ludum Dare I’ve competed in is a lack of initial confidence in my idea. I always second-guess myself and this compo was no exception.

I especially felt that the sprites I was drawing would not work. I nearly scrapped the idea right there, but my bad experience a year ago with wasting time on a second idea when working on Disphere led me to stick with my original plan.

One Room Hotel Early Development The basic mechanisms in place.  At this point I was still thinking about changing game ideas.

This uncertainty continued throughout the night, and into the next day.

I finished the day with a post showing people entering the hotel.

One Room Hotel With Guests The game started to have some form, but I was still unhappy with it.

the first day

When I woke up to start work the first full day, I saw that this was the most “hearted” post I had ever made, with 17 hearts. This is what finally convinced me that this was the idea to work on. If people were responding this well to such a basic illustration of the mechanics, I must have been on to something.

Getting the people to look good was a struggle, and took the better part of an hour and a half. For a while I was worried that I would need to pursue a different graphical style, but I ended up managing it.

When I finished the amenities, the game really started to come together. It started to fell like a real game, and I felt it was time to share what the gameplay was really like. I came up with a simple backstory for the game, and made a post. In a couple hours, this post had 27 hearts.

One Room Hotel With Three Amenities The most hearted image I have ever posted.

This post is by far the best received progress update I have ever had, and helped motivate me as I began to add more fleshed-out gameplay.

The next major change to the game was the addition of the day-night cycle. I needed a way to make it clear when a round was going to end and to create a feeling of progression during a stage, and this was the perfect way to do so.

Unfortunately, this somehow managed to be the most time consuming process of the entire project. I struggled with calculating how to blend colors, and with the scripts for doing so in GameMaker Studio. I eventually resorted to trial and error for getting the sky’s brightness right, and used an overlay rather than blending the color.

The ordeal was worth it, though, as it made the world feel more alive and gave the game a much better progression. The progression still wasn’t perfect, however, so I started to brainstorm ways around this.

One Room Hotel Timelapse The day night cycle took far too long to implement, but it was worth it.

After the day night cycle, there were still a few issues with the progression of the game. People came and went at any time of day, and rounds had nothing substantial separating them. I fixed this through two changes:

The first was a three part structure to days.

  • In the morning, people enter the hotel, and the player is calm.
  • In the afternoon, the hotel is full and hectic, making the player stressed.
  • At night, people leave the hotel, releasing the stress from the afternoon.

This change in the intensity of the day over time is critical to the feeling of the game. The stress I wanted would have tired the player if it was constant, or even if it was random. Because it happened at a specific time during the day, it created anticipation and gave the player a chance to prepare. This wasn’t perfect, however, as the RNG could throw incredibly difficult situations at the player. This is an issue with all of my games, and it is the main complaint people have with One Room Hotel in particular.

The next feature I added to improve the flow was hotel construction. The time between rounds felt rushed, and I needed another step in order to ease the transition to the next stage.

I thought about what I could add that would fit with the progression of the game, and I realized that adding a screen where you must construct your tower would accomplish three things:

  • Break up the time in between stages
  • Give a sense of progression as the tower grows higher
  • Add a layer (or maybe the illusion of a layer) of strategy

The building screen accomplished all of these things in my mind, and I personally think the blueprint aesthetic during construction looks really cool.

Construction of the One Room Hotel Construction helped the rhythm of the game, helping to better delineate stages.

After construction was finished, I squashed bugs and implemented small features for a while before going to sleep, with a near feature complete game ready for polishing on the second full day.

the second day

PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC

At the start of the second day, I had around 20-30 items on my to-do list, which was just a little bit nerve wracking. I legitimately thought I wouldn’t finish, but I pushed through and just started working despite this worry. Worries like that have hurt my performance in previous events, and I was NOT going to let that happen again.

After all of the panicking, I decided that the most important thing to get done was the user interface. I’ve neglected this somewhat in the past and it has hurt the quality of my games. I spent a few hours on the interface, and tried a few different styles before I settled on what I used in game (and in the styling of this post.)

One Room Hotel UI and Reviews I chose a UI matching the color palette of the hotel.

I also worked on the in-game UI, and got that looking good with a color changing satisfaction meter and an icon for your money (score.)

I wish I had taken the time to make a separate icon for satisfaction, but I was forced to focus on others things.

One Room Hotel User Interface The basic in-game interface: the satisfaction meter and score.

Something I added that not many people seem to have noticed is the randomly generated hotel and newspaper names. There are thousands of potential hotel names, each generated from an adjective, a noun, and then a type of establishment (Inn, resort, hotel, ETC.)

  • remote smile resort
  • summer arc retreat
  • summer cliff hotel
  • spring shark resort
  • enchanting gulf retreat
  • winter pond tower
  • regal delight hotel
  • enchanting tornado resort
  • winter mountain resort
  • pleasant delight tower
  • globetrotter mountain resort
  • regal park tower
  • pleasant arc tower

The newspaper names were a little simpler. They also consisted of three parts, but the first was simply a choice between have “The ” or “” at the start of the name. The next part was a noun, and the third was a type of publication.

  • The Remote Week
  • The Silver Herald
  • Hotel Times
  • Fascinating Week
  • Inn Enquirer
  • Terracotta Times
  • Hotel Journal
  • The Pleasant Week
  • Royal Tribune
  • Summer Chronicle
  • Happy Gazette

I love adding details like this to the game, whether or not anyone notices 😛

Since near the beginning I had ideas for the music of the game. I wanted some medium tempo jazz for the menus, and a really fast tune for in-game. I only had time to implement the menu music, unfortunately. I was disappointed at first, but when I changed the music to play in-game I realized it worked pretty well.

The music was originally intended to be for the menus only.

I made the music using Mixcraft 6 (NOT recommended, very buggy) and midi instruments, along with a (musical) keyboard. To come up with the tune I hummed along with the game when I was testing and recorded it. Once I sang something that I liked I just needed to figure out the notes to actually play it.

I would highly recommend this method to anyone who doesn’t typically write music, as it really saves time and does a lot for quality if you don’t know how to write music. It’s a lot easier to improvise melodies when singing then to mess around with a keyboard until something sounds good.

final hours

For me, the final hours of any event are some of the most important. This is where I add a final layer of polish, and elevate the game to the next level of quality. Strangely, what I feel is the most important single change I made on the final day was making the sun better:

One Room Hotel New and Old Sun The old sun is on the left.

The yellow of the sun brings the game’s visual style together, and I think it turned out really well. I don’t know why, but that’s when I really felt like I had made something good. Maybe that’s weird but that’s how I work.

reception

One Room Hotel is the best received game I have ever made. I’m really happy with it, and I’m ecstatic reading people’s reviews.

A few people have called it one of the best games of the event. I never thought I would get to this point in my game development, and I am so happy that people feel this way about my game.

I’m incredibly excited to see how the game places, and I hope to finally break into the top 50 for fun, and maybe even for overall.

post compo plans

I may release a post jam version of the game, fixing some of the issues with it, and it may be coming to Android. I’m not sure at this point, but it is a possibility. I’m more likely to focus on a long-term project I’m going to be working on for FFSJama manic shooter.

Thank you so much for reading!

play now

 

LudumPost

 

Room of Shadows! Compo Entry – This is my first game that has a beginning and an ending. All my other projects are just small 1 scene core feature examples.

I had tons of fun trying to crunch out game play with the 48 hour time frame looming over my head. I started late, so I lost about 8 hours and also slept >.<

 

Originally I was building for isometric 3D, but ended up swapping into top down orthographic because it looked better at the time. I ran out of time to do audio, and add in enemy models and animations (so you get to fight placeholder spheres for now). Had zero time to play test / adjust settings of the game for difficulty and performance. My computer is pretty good, so I never saw performance problems with the current settings. Attack range of the enemies could be increased a bit, sometimes they stop just out of range. Oh well, download it an tell me what you think!!

 

I’m kinda burnt out, but I may spend the rest of the day adding music / sound effects, wall destruction effects, enemy models and animations. If I can finish it all, I’ll post it for the jam event if that is allowed.

Link to my entry

Mead Boy: Game Feel and Level Design

Posted by (twitter: @blubberquark)
Tuesday, September 6th, 2016 8:08 am

logo

play Mead Boy or read on:

This is not a post-mortem of the development process, but an explanation of the game design and what makes it tick.

Game Design

Mead Boy is a small platformer where your goal is to drink all the mead. The more mead you drink, the more laggy your controls get. Alcohol wears off slowly and linearly, just like real life. Also like in real life, a single drink impacts your reflexes enough to make many tasks perceivably more difficult. A tenth of a second of lag is already noticeable. In order to make players not just wait out the effects of the alcohol, and progress slowly, there is hunger clock and a time-based scoring system. Food pickups set back the hunger clock, and Gold pickups increase the score. One per mille of BAC creates a lag of one second and takes ten seconds to wear off. This should incentivise players to look for food while stillslightly drunk. Levels are small and take under a minute to complete. Levels should pose little challenge “sober”.

Each level represents a real city from the Viking age. There is an overworld map that shows you where the city is, and how a river connects it to the sea. There is some looting and pillaging, but no combat or violence against people shown.

fortress2016-09-06T14_55_18

fortress2016-09-06T14_55_28

 

 

Game Feel

Speed and Momentum

fortress2016-09-06T14_54_07

Mead boy is a game about going right, going fast, picking up speed, and jumping far. (At least when you’re sober. When you are drunk, you pick up speed and go too fast. Your first instinct if the character is not responding right away is to hit the buttons harder.) There are only three buttons needed to control Mead Boy: Left, Right, Jump.

Mead Boy responds to button presses instantly, but he keeps accelerating until he reaches a top speed of 5.5 pixels per frame. When you stop pressing the button, he decelerates exponentially. At speeds below 1 px/frame he stops completely (like stiction compared friction). This way there is no “long tail” of slow sliding after landing a jump, which feels weird and floaty and may make you fall off a cliff when you don’t expect it. The following diagram shows a plot of speed and button presses, where you can see a long attack and a quick release phase:

diag1

Jumping

fortress2016-09-06T14_54_19

Jumps are always the same height, and there is no way to increase or reduce the jump height. Like Mario or Sonic, Mead boy goes right fast. Mead Boy is not Luigi or Mega Man. The Camera only scrolls on the left-right axis, in order to de-emphasise going up or down.

No Turning on a Dime

Mead Boy can come to a standstill relatively fast, but turning around is harder: When he is still moving into the opposite direction, the slow acceleration takes longer than simply stopping first and then accelerating into the other direction. This makes the momentum feel “weightier”, but it is also kind of frustrating. Mead Boy is running really fast; you can’t just turn around. Well, now you know and can exploit the behaviour for speed running!

diag2

fortress2016-09-06T15_04_09

 

 

Level Design

play Mead Boy before you get spoiled!

Haithabu

haithabu level

Haithabu Level – Click to see at full resolution

This is a kind of tutorial and sandbox level. There are only three units of alcohol and enough food. You have to jump out of some pits, but there is no way to drown or to get stuck. You spawn on the left and have to go right. You can also go back left. You have to use both running and jumping controls, so I know you can use them when you advance to the next level.

How the level fits with the theme: This level is inspired by the Viking city of Haithabu. The destruction of Haithabu marked the end of the Viking age. Haithabu is your home base and a safe place. That’s why there is no longship. You arrived on foot. Haithabu is your home.

Lindisfarne

lindisfarne level

Lindisfarne – Click to see at full resolution

The second level is much bigger. There is only water on the left and land on the right. After the first mead pickup, there are two food items that should reset your hunger clock. The only “dangerous” jump comes right after: You can fall and drown, and you might still be slightly drunk at this point. You have to make a leap of faith. After the next jump, you are free to take all the gold and set the buildings on fire. Jumping to get the gold or over the small bump after the cathedral may be tricky due to alcohol, but you can safely retry: No real challenge.

How it fits the historical theme: The Viking raid of the Lindisfarne monastery marked the beginning of the Viking age. There are stone buildings and churches that kind of look like an English monastery of the era.

London

london level

London – Click to see at full resolution

This was the first level I had designed. There is more alcohol, the same amount of food, and you have to jump over a gap to get food. The last bit on the right requires you to jump onto a small platform after two units of alcohol. Definitely harder than Lindisfarne, but not much.

Historical Inspiration: The building on the right is a mash-up between the tower bridge and the tower of London. London was raided by Vikings multiple times. The tower bridge was not there during the Viking age, please forgive my anachronism.

Paris

paris level

Paris – Click to see full resolution

Paris is a step up in challenge. There are two deadly jumps in the beginning, lots of going up and down and the buildings you torch are relatively small. You have to go back and forth to collect all the food or gold.

The Lore: Paris was attacked by Vikings a couple of times under Charlemagne. Once they paid ransom, once they didn’t. Guess how that turned out. Also red wine and the Eiffel tower (super anachronism) to make sure you get that it’s Paris.

Hamburg

hamburg level

Hamburg – Click to see full resolution

Hamburg is the last and hardest level. It has the most alcohol, lots of water to drown in, and gaps where you have to jump right and up or down. I expect you to lose this on the first try. Nonetheless you can make many jumps drunk. Losing is fun!

History: Hamburg is a port city and a member of the Hanse. It has trading post houses right in the harbor. Also a dike. Also vikings.

play Mead Boy and comment please

(more…)

Updates

Posted by (twitter: @TheFish523)
Thursday, September 1st, 2016 2:54 pm

I’ve been updating my game.

Now there’s more sound, a mute option, tweaked enemies, and better game-play.

 

You can find it here.

 

A simple little game.

Posted by
Tuesday, August 30th, 2016 1:03 am

Check out Archaic Light! It takes less than 5 minutes to complete, so why not?

You might enjoy the ending!

Ludum Dare Page

GameJolt Page


This game was made in one day with the theme, ancient technology, in mind. I also used 8-bit styles from preference. Go check it out! You have nothing to lose! Or do you?

Archaic Light - Game Icon

 

Post-Mortem updates.

Posted by (twitter: @TheFish523)
Monday, August 29th, 2016 8:29 pm

I’ve been doing a lot of taking feed back. So, some improvements:

Faster game-play. (Opposite of what people recommended , it’s actually better)

Fixed Camera.

New animation before enemies spawn (So you can tell where enemies will spawn).

My LD36 entry is here

If you liked the original, slower version you can get it here

 

Day 1 So Far

Posted by
Sunday, August 28th, 2016 3:22 pm

Do you like Chinese food?

What could do the ancient Chinese men with a rocket and some gunpowder?

Unmistakably shot himself toward the stars!

A launching game about an especially bored Chinese and his massive rocket, the prototype(some squares gliding) is nearly finished, and we also got some art done.

He's staring right at your soul.

He’s staring right at your soul.

So far so good, we expect to get something playable for tomorrow and maybe a demo for you to play.

Thank you for you support guys and lets have a great LD!!!

Small Update

Posted by (twitter: @TheFish523)
Sunday, August 28th, 2016 1:42 pm

Fixed the camera for my entry. Each time you jumped you couldn’t see the enemies below you, it was annoying.

Screenshot2You can get it here .

Turned my Ludum Dare game into full game launched on Steam! :)

Posted by (twitter: @BPOutlaws)
Saturday, July 23rd, 2016 10:54 am

Hey everyone! If you played my dragon game back in Ludum Dare 33:

I kept working on it and turned it into a full game, and just launched it on Steam! Figured it could be good inspiration for people participating in LDJAMs to keep working on their entry if they come up with a cool mechanic/idea…who knows, you might be able to to turn it into a full game!

Here’s the trailer:

Grab it on Steam here:


http://store.steampowered.com/app/498190

My next game is ALSO going to be based of my LDJAM entry from Ludum Dare 35:

https://bulletproofoutlaws.itch.io/shootinggamething

Hope this inspires some people to take their games beyond their Game Jam entries if they think they’ve stumbled across something fun! With a few more months of work you might be able to turn it into an awesome game you might be able to pay your rent with! 😉

Follow me on Twitter at @BPOutlaws, I use it as a devBlog lol

– Jeff

Obstruction, a game by Toasted Games!

Posted by (twitter: @ToastedGames)
Thursday, June 23rd, 2016 7:17 pm

Hey all, my name is Ben and I’m a member of a team of three friends that we call Toasted Games! If you haven’t heard about us before, here’s our info. Anyway, the reason I made this post was because I made a huge post on our website about my personal creation, Obstruction! Obstruction is a game about creating courses and maneuvering through them, and sharing those courses with your friends! The game will likely be released this year, and we’d love it if you could check it out. If you’re interested, start by reading the post I just made!

CLICK TO READ POST!

We hope to see you around! ^_^

  • Ben

Hi~ Thanks a lot for your reading !

I have wrote a similary post not long ago, but it seems like  there were  almost  no people noticed it at that time… QoQ  (  i think  it may becasue there were so many people also wrote new post at that time,so my post was pushed to the back page sooo quickly.. otz )

The motivation to add this post is because i relaized that to play these game which have similary theme or have similary emphasis/focus  chooose with me, may  could  provoke more reflection and  introspection from this process for eachother,  also the discovery process  really let me feel happy and exciting !

but because  the final  approaches /time will not enough  , i think maybe  i should  try to express this information again and let me more easy to found these game which i hope to play .  moreover, i  really want  to play more game which  may could vibes to me in  the final day…

thus, dear friends

if your game or some other games  you have played in this LD  have similary  theme  with my game

( or  like  this  game  < Flutterby>  which i have played  recently and found have simiary topic but choose different perspectives) 

please leave a comment/link for me.

but furthermore ,  I  also hope to play some game which focus on emotions/psychological

 

 hope get your could recoomend to me !  I will play it and leave my feedback(as detailed as possible)

T-F-O-S logo

sincere thanks!

—————————————

(more…)

Post Mortem: A Mazeshift Title

Posted by
Friday, May 6th, 2016 9:57 am

Hi everyone,

This was my second Ludum Dare. Once again I had a fantastic time participating, and playing the other entries is a great source of pleasure and inspiration. I wrote a post mortem for my game A Mazeshift Title, which you can play here (Unity WebGL version available).

 

Screenshot1A Mazeshift Title

The Game

A Mazeshift Title is a 2D puzzle game where the player must construct a route between two endpoints using a collection of shapes organised in a grid. These shapes are manipulated by shifting entire rows horizontally, or columns vertically. It could easily be compared with a 2D version of a Rubik’s cube, with a pattern that must be completed. The game contains 7 individual levels, and each one is procedurally generated to provide a degree of replayability.

Development

The idea for the game was originally conceived from thinking about shifting bits in computer registers, but using shapes instead. A good three hours on the Saturday morning were spent settling on a design. I felt it was important to take the extra time at this stage to ensure the concept was both interesting and achievable. By the time I had stopped on the Saturday night, the game consisted of a single feature-complete level.

The focus of Sunday was polish: after creating some menus and finishing the transitions between different levels, I moved onto audio. I ended up spending many hours fighting with multiple software packages, and eventually only managed to produce three sound effects. I had initially anticipated having enough time to produce a simple ambient background music track, but this no longer seemed feasible. Some visual polish feature had also been planned, such as sliding the grid tiles when they are shifted, but sadly these also had to be cut.

The Good

  • Procedurally generated puzzles.
  • The mechanics are explained non-verbally using a trivial first level.
  • I followed my plan: the core mechanics were implemented by Saturday night, Sunday was spent polishing the game.

The Bad

  • No music.
  • Tiles don’t slide when shifted.

Thanks for reading, see you all next time!

ShmupShifter Final Version Released

Posted by
Monday, May 2nd, 2016 5:33 pm

ShmupShifter Final Version Released

 

shmupshifter-final-1

The final version of my Ludum Dare game, ShmupShifter, is now released on itch.io! If you want to play a real difficulty arcade shmup, this is the game for you! ShmupShifter features 3 stages with 3 unique boss fights, and, with infinitely looping gameplay, the difficulty scales with your skill!

level2final

 

New Features:

  • Easy Mode
  • Level Select
  • Balancing
  • Fixed Bugs
  • background (!)
  • Enhanced Particles
  • Flashy Explosions
  • Screen Shake
  • Better Audio Balance
  • New Sound Effects
  • A Beatable Second Loop
  • And more things I forgot about!

 

level3final

 

From the description:

ShmupShifter is a 3 stage manic shooter developed in 48 hours for the Ludum Dare 35 compo, based on the theme “Shapeshift.”

Fight 6 enemy types and three boss fights as you make you way through space. Use your powers of transformation to gain an upper hand, firing on enemies from all sides.

Featuring real shoot-em-up difficulty, ShmupShifter will surely satisfy your shmup appetite.

 

Try ShmupShifter today!

 

A Challenge:

Beat ShmupShifter and be awarded with the TerraCottaFrog’s ld35 True Shmupper Trophy!

trophy

Check out Mushroom Muncher!

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016 2:28 am

Now that the jam is over, it’s time to play games! Check out the the game we made where you eat mushroom men, grow in size and watch out for shape-shifting ones:

Mushroom Muncher - Cover

PLAY NOW!

 

 

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