Posts Tagged ‘virus’

Self-taught game design: let’s learn it together!

Posted by
Monday, January 4th, 2016 8:48 pm

It seems that years have passed, but it was about one month ago that we developed the first prototype of Deep Hunt for Ludum Dare 34. We were four guys with one dream: develop our first video game even having little or no knowledge in game design, software development, graphic design, project management or marketing.

Yay! Our first game!

 

We had 72 hours to start studying these topics, come up with an idea and make it playable:

and we did it (play ludum dare version in here), we made our procedural dungeon with sonar-based orientation game!

 

 

 

Deep Hunt 4Deep Hunt Feedback

red pill studioAfter this crazy weekend filled by online tutorials and coffee, you can imagine how motivated we got when the game was submitted and the positive feedback came. It was the kick-start we needed to start the Red Pill Gamedev.
Our mission? Not only become professional game developers, but also share our learning with those who have the same passion for game design. I’ll make sure to post in my blog every single new information we discover during this journey and make it an useful tool for those who wish to develop new skills with us. I’ll try to make your path easier than it was for me and assure we evolve together.

Our first goal? Polish Deep Hunt, our first project, to a publishing-level.

deep hunt 3deep hunt 2

Our progress so far? After one month dealing with our jobs and social lives, we found enough time to finish the Alpha version. Now, depending on the feedback, we will put some improvements in practice: skill-tree upgrades, new enemies, new behaviors, improved graphics, conversion to Unity, better mobile version and more.

deephunt

You can play our post-ludum-dare Alpha version on your browser for free!

What about you? How did you start in Game Development? Comment on our blog and read more articles about Game Design, Production, Programming, and more: How I came to be a game maker

 

Last days!

Posted by
Thursday, December 31st, 2015 9:12 am

Hello guys! It’s the last week of voting, and it would be lovely if we could get just a bit more reviews. So if you have it in your heart and you have time, please check out our game as a new-years present for us! Thanks in advance! :)

Play our game HERE!

Being on the other end of a virus can be fun

Posted by
Tuesday, December 15th, 2015 10:39 am

Hi guys,

If you would like to play a simple puzzle game where you are the computer virus, please take a second to check out our game. We hope you like it 😉

Play it here!

 

Névtelen3LD34_Gif03

Post Mortem

Posted by
Monday, August 31st, 2015 4:37 pm

So Ludum Dare #33 lies behind us now, and I take the chance to write a quick follow-up of how this all turned out for me.

There is also a timelapse video of Virus‘ development:

The Preparation

I didn’t prepare much this time. No basic games to get back into the whole process, not many commits to my engine.
What was important though was that I made a list of ideas for the 20 final themes, which helped me a lot in getting creative and was quite a bit of fun, too.

The First Night

I forgot to commit final but crucial changes to my engine, which I consider would be cheating since then I would be the only one with access to that code. I noticed my mistake very late, and after documenting and committing everything there were only about two hours of sleep left.

When I woke up and started Eclipse as well as my timelapse software, I noticed the latter didn’t really work. Everything looked JPEG-ish, even though I had set it to PNG. I spent the last seven minutes before the theme announcement quickly building my own timelapse script, just to realize the original software did work correctly… Anyway.

I was not happy with “You Are The Monster”. Not at all. I mean, I knew that the chance for it was high, but still. I ended up making my biggest mistake, not sticking to the idea I had prepared beforehand. I wanted to do something atmospheric, something calm, like flying a bird. There was my idea – you play an eagle, which looks friendly at first glance, but for something like a mouse an eagle is quite the monster.

I built awesome flying mechanics (really, they deserve to be called “awesome”), made the textures, and put it all together into a lovely little eagle. It would even sit down when you flew it to the ground!
Unfortunately, after spending around six hours on that, I had no idea what to do with it.

My eagle

After sleeping a little, 14 hours in, I gave up. Back to my original idea: playing as a virus that infects all of humanity.

Starting Over

Progress came fast, since I had mostly the whole thing in mind from the start. In just a few hours, the basics were already done, although it was still far from a game.
In the evening that day, I took a break from coding and started with:

The Music

I am bad at making music, there’s no doubt about it. Partly because of my missing experience, I guess – this was the second time I ever made something for real.
It isn’t what you’d expect when you think of the word “music”, it’s rather some disturbed synthesizer sounds with a heavy focus on drums. Those are the only two things I am not that bad at. It turned out OK.

Want to listen to it? Play my game!

Making It A Game

After tuning the music to my satisfaction, I added the progress minimap, tweaked the gameplay and added the main opponent: vaccine production.

I also changed the background to a non-static one, with a pseudo perspective on the houses. Very proud of that!

Final look at Virus

Voice Acting

I appear to be surprisingly good at voice acting. It was my first time to ever narrate anything, and I only did one single recording, but it turned out very well!
One hour of effects work to make it sound like some highly-disturbed walkie-talkie transmission, and suddenly my game got a lot better.

Testing & Fine Tuning

Obviously, when you have played such a simple game for a few hours, you get really good at it. That is a problem, because as the developer, you have had to play it over and over again, which means you don’t know how hard or easy it is for someone starting from the beginning. That is where I got other people involved, basically just playing the game and reporting back how it worked for them.
Then followed lots of fine tuning, since the game turned out a lot harder than I had thought.

After one of them managed to win, I called it a success and submitted my game.

My Overall Experience

This Ludum Dare was absolutely great. I had a bad start, but after that, everything went very smoothly and I am happy with the outcome.

The way I did it this time appears to be how I should always handle game jams in the future. Giving everything you have drains a lot of energy, and you lose more than you gain. If you do this in a more relaxed way, you are not exhausted and get to do more.

  • If you haven’t yet, you can view my entry here: Virus
  • The development is available on YouTube, sped up to just over 5 minutes: Timelapse
  • And please vote :-)

Thanks for reading,
JangoBrick

Done! Ready to infect some people?

Posted by
Sunday, August 23rd, 2015 3:33 pm

I AM DONE. Done with my game, Virus, done with this Ludum Dare.
It has been a great one, and I’m looking forward to the next one.

Anyway, there’s still one thing I fear, like every time – the fear of the game being unbalanced, the graphics looking even worse to others than to me, audio not playing, or something else in that direction.
That fear is hard to come by on my own, so I need your help.

Please help me test this thing!

I would be more than happy if you could visit my game (here is the Entry Page) and give me crucial feedback in these few remaining hours.
If you do, I’ll gladly give your game a vote as soon as that’s possible.

Have fun whatever you’re doing, be it finishing up your own game or looking through the ones made by others!

Here’s a quick screen cap of my game for the jam!

Posted by (twitter: @Alen_Frost)
Sunday, April 27th, 2014 5:44 pm
Screen cap of my first game jam ever!

Screen cap of my first game jam ever!

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