Ludum Dare 36
Coming August 26th-29th Weekend

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FINAL ROUND

Posts Tagged ‘unity’

Dare me!

Posted by
Wednesday, August 24th, 2016 10:16 am

This weekend will certainly be interesting. I’m really hoping for a decent theme to work with, somehow last LDs didn’t really appeal to me.
Since I’m in Germany, Europe I will start later, roughly 4-5 hours after the inital start. Can’t justify staying up that late into the night, especially not being productive at all. (Plus I have work again on Monday.)

If I feel like it I might stream the whole thing over on Twitch, but don’t count on it. 😉

My tools of trade are the following:

Engine: Unity 5 or SuperPowers
Code Editor & Text Editor: Visual Studio, Atom, Notepad++
Audio: Fruity Loops, Audacity, sfxr, Abundant Music
Graphics: Photoshop, 3DS Max
Misc: 2 Monitors (24″ + 22″), Cherry MX-Board 3.0 Mechanical Keyboard with Brown Switches, Xbox 360 Gamepad, M-Audio KeyRig 49 MIDI Keyboard, Coffee, Cats to cuddle with <3

I’m in (plus resources for Unity)

Posted by (twitter: @dylanwolf)
Monday, August 22nd, 2016 11:08 pm

I’m in, using Unity as usual. In addition, I’ve gradually been building a collection of one-off C# scripts that can be used for basic behaviors such as:

  • camera scrolling/locking
  • visual effects (bouncing, etc.)
  • basic logic for match-3 and 2D platforming
  • helpers for sound effects
  • UI helpers
  • object pooling

Per the compo rules, they’re open for anyone to use: https://bitbucket.org/dylanwolf/ludumdareresources

There’s a sixth time for everything – I’m in!

Posted by (twitter: @rjhelms)
Sunday, August 21st, 2016 3:14 pm

Ludum Dare is pretty much the best, so I’m doing it again. As I have every single Ludum Dare to date, I’m going to aim for the compo, with a good awareness that I’m going to miss the deadline. Either way, I’ll be following all the compo rules.

Toolchain is unchanged from last time, except for software updates:

  • Unity 5 with Visual Studio,
  • Photoshop for graphics,
  • ChipTone for sound effects,
  • REAPER and my iPad for music.

With respect to declaring code I may end up using: Aron Granberg’s A* library treats me well, so it will be on hand if I end up needing it. I also may yoink a few pieces of boilerplate or common utilities (level loader, resolution/aspect ratio correction, etc.) from my previous LD entries, which are all in my GitHub repo.

Game on!

Skyway on IndieDB!

Posted by (twitter: @RobProductions)
Monday, August 8th, 2016 8:25 pm

Hello everyone!

I’m still hard at work on my latest game Skyway, which you may remember. I’ve just made an IndieDB page which will hold screenshots and updates! The game is a bit behind schedule but it should be officially announced sometime this month, and should release before 2017.

Screen6

Skyway

Please check it out! I’m pretty worried about what people will think of it come announcement time, so feedback is appreciated!

If you haven’t already, follow me on Twitter, and good luck to everyone in the LD!

Reworking my LD 34 entry Eda

Posted by (twitter: @alpha_rats)
Sunday, June 5th, 2016 7:12 am

I’m currently reworking my LD34 entry, a bonsai-growing game called Eda.

First  of all : thanks a lot to the Ludum Dare community for all the useful feedbacks on the first version of the game!
Many of these insights are now implemented, and contributed dramatically to improve the game and motivate me to push it further.

The LD vesion of the game

The original version (playable here) allowed the player to choose the branches he wished to grow. The player had overall limited agency over the tree’s evolution, and the game presented little variety outside of diverse planting pots.

tumblr_nzepnlW2r91tqwxxoo1_400

My LD 34 entry Eda

The current version of the game

In it’s current state, the game presents two different shaping tools : growing and pruning.

It also features now :

– different varieties of trees to choose from or to grow randomly
– different planters and little carpets to choose from or to randomize
– four seasons with different color schemes, depending on moon cycles
– an in-game screenshot mechanic
– a proper menu and decent UI
– improved graphics
– a more fluid and adaptative camera
– fully rewritten and optimized code

A lot of these ideas came firectly from the suggestions made here on the LD website, so once again: thanks everybody!

alpha_rats-Eda screenshot- main screen 04june

Eda, screenshot : June 2016

alpha_rats-eda-screenshot june20165png

Eda, screenshot : June 2016

alpha_rats-eda-screenshot june20163png

Eda, screenshot : June 2016

Where is it heading to?

The plan is to have a free demo by mid-june and to ship the finished project by September 2016, for desktop and Android.

The main remaining features yet to implement :
– make the tree evolve depending on season cycles (bloom, fall, growing fruits, etc…)
– add some weather elements (rain, snow, sunshine, etc…)
– add more tree shaping and tree care elements
– give more variety to the different kinds of trees, with more varied growing shapes
– have different kind of background scenery, eventually randomly generated

And finally : thanks to Mathis Bouron who did a great job with the soundtrack and sound effects, and continues to do so now for the new version of the game!

 

Thank you!

Posted by (twitter: @SantiHisteria)
Tuesday, May 10th, 2016 8:35 am

Happy for my first game jam results… and I’ll try to be better for the next!

RatingBreakingFat

Thank you very much to everybody that played and gave me a feedback my game. I’m sure that I will make the full version of “Breaking Fat” in the near future :)

See you soon!!

Hart of the Forest – Post-jam Preview

Posted by (twitter: @adsilcott)
Monday, May 9th, 2016 7:44 pm

LD35 might officially be over within the hour, but our 2nd Door Studio team is excited to carry on the project with our continued development of our game, Hart of the Forest.  From the beginning, we knew that our project was probably a bigger idea than the fast time limit of the Ludum Dare would allow, but the last three weeks have given us the chance to keep going, bringing our original jam submission to something that’s starting to feel much closer to the game we have in mind.  We’d love to share that with you now, to celebrate the end of the review period!

To jump right into the good part, please feel free to try our latest post-jam build at the link below:

Hart of the Forest – Post-Jam Preview Build (WebGL, early alpha test!)

Or, if you want to see the original, here’s our Original Ludum Dare Page

Controls:

  • W, A, S, D (or Arrow Keys): Move
  • Mouse Move: Rotate, move camera
  • 1, 2, 3: Shapeshift forms (Druid, Stag, Bear)
  • Z: Change Camera Angle (Overhead / Third-person)

Before diving in, here are a few screenshots, to help paint the picture:

The idea behind our game (and our implementation in the jam edition) started fairly small, and has grown into something we hope is much larger and more cohesive, in terms of both the gameplay and the story/experience.

For starters, we’ve moved away from the strictly top-down view, offering both an over-the-shoulder third person camera (with more traditional adventure/RPG game controls), and an overhead camera that will make it easier to see your surroundings (when, say, escorting villagers or the like).  This opened up a range of new visual dimensions to explore, including:

  • New terrain, with regions like hills and valleys, a river, a lake, and denser/sparser stretches of forest
  • Light and shadow effects both tree shadows, dynamic leaf shadows, and rolling cloud shadows
  • Water effects including the flowing river, waterfalls, and bridges
  • Pathways that wind through the forest, which will become the roads that both villagers and enemies follow

Put simply, this let the whole forest start to feel more like a real place, and, hopefully, someplace you could get to know by exploring it.  We picture a forest teeming with life, plants, animals, spirits and people, all good and bad alike.  (And therefore tasking you, as its protector, try to do the best you can to protect this place as things begin to play out.)

We’ve also been playing with a number of new features, many of which are implemented already (though not necessarily in this build, as we test), including:

New Abilities and Features

  • Spells, in the Druid form (including our first test spell, which locates lost villagers and sends out a glowing beacon trail, to help you find them)
  • Combat abilities as the Druid (you can test what will be our archery system by holding down left-click — pretend this is fully implemented)
  • Spirit Vision (a Good/Evil Detection system), in the Hart form (letting you detect good villagers from corrupted ones, and helping you spot enemies in the woods)
  • Combat abilities as the Bear (including charges, roars, and swipes)
  • A minimap (sadly omitted for now, as we decide how much this helps or hurts the feeling of immersion in the game)
  • Enemy abilities (including a particularly wicked Area of Effect spell by the new enemy spellcaster, which targets groups of your villagers as they follow you!)
  • Dynamic pathfinding, based on Unity’s NavMesh system, and a custom waypoint system, letting friends and enemies follow roads to their destinations.

We also have a range of new visual updates in the worlds, including an overhaul of our Druid hero (with all this new movement and action, it was time for him to get a bit younger and stronger…!), and some new enemies to face, including the new sort of “anti-Druid,” the “beast-man” berserker enemy.  See those two below:

The game certainly still has a long way to go, but we’ve been so glad to work on this while the reviews were still coming in for the rough prototype of the jam version, and we can’t thank you all enough for the kind words of encouragement!  They have kept us inspired, even through the frustration of posting an incomplete game at the end of the jam!

The concept, as we see it now, will be a kind of single-player open world game set in this one large, high-detailed forest map, where individual “levels” are comprised of objectives including (you guessed it) saving villagers, repelling enemies, and also new things such as saving or defeating good and evil forest spirits, collecting needed components throughout the forest, building up your sanctuary by bringing it new people and materials, and completing quests for the various inhabitants of the forest.

The end result is a hybrid game that we think will be a new and interesting mix of familiar ideas, and one that we’re really looking forward to playing, ourselves.

We would love to hear your feedback, and to offer you the glimpse of the work we’ve put in so far over these last three weeks, in the form of our current nightly build — link below:

Hart of the Forest – Post-Jam Preview Build (WebGL, early alpha test!)

Or, for these last few minutes, see our Original Ludum Dare Page, if you want to leave a last-minute review!  (Thanks!)

Thank you all, hugely, again for the feedback and support, and keep the suggestions coming!  It’s been an honor, everyone — and we hope to see you all in the future!

Thanks for playing Mushroom Muncher!

Monday, May 9th, 2016 3:04 pm

Before another LD is almost over, hope you all enjoyed it as much as we did! Unfortunately we couldn’t play and rate a lot of games this time, but hopefully next time we can!

If you haven’t tried out game Mushroom Muncher yet, you can check it out at the link below:

PLAY HERE!

Mushroom Muncher - Cover

We won’t be participated in next LD, but we’ll see you at LD37!

Cheers.

The Art of “Hart of the Forest”: A Design Post-mortem

Posted by (twitter: @adsilcott)
Monday, May 9th, 2016 2:14 pm

Hi everyone, Greg (artist/modeler/musician) from 2nd Door Studios.  Here on the last day of LD35, our team thought it would be nice and hopefully useful to recap the many things that went both right and wrong with our ambitious little game:

Hart of the Forest” (Click that link there if you’re curious to try it!)

From the start, our group found the “Shapeshifting” theme pretty challenging, and it took us well into Saturday morning to find a concept that we all liked.  Our final idea was challenging, but interesting to us — putting you into the role of protector of a mystical forest, a Druid, charged with gathering your lost villagers and shepherding them back to safety, while trying to both use and also hide your powerful shapeshifting curse.

There were a lot of things we hoped to do with this, and two things proved themselves fairly quickly: 1) that the full scope of our idea was probably bigger than a game jam would allow, but 2) that we were all eager to see just how close we could come in spite of that, and how much of it we could make by the deadline.

I wanted to go through the workflow and notes from my own section of the work, which included the 3D sculptures, models, animation, and eventually the music of our game.

First and foremost, our team uses the free/mighty/wonderful Blender for all of the 3D work you’ll see here, as I’d happily encourage anyone to do.  The start of our concepts was to get our core characters sculpted, giving our team the chance to look at them all and get a better feel for the tone and the visual style of our game.  Here are a few glimpses of those pieces:

These sculptures gave us our starting point, leading to the retopology process of simplifying them until they were ready for what would ultimately be a Unity WebGL game.  This is where our largest challenge, and still our biggest technical hurdle stole the show…

See our bear/stag animation in action if you click this link

From the very beginning, our plan was to try to make use of Blender’s “Shape Keys” (“BlendShapes” in Unity parlance), to let these shapeshifts be as organic as possible.  Like the story of our game, this ended up being kind of a blessing and a curse, within the timeframe of the game jam.  While, after great effort, I did get this all working (see/click the gif above), Unity didn’t love the idea.  There were a hundred other technical considerations to factor into this process, including needing to morph the animated rig inside this mesh as well (no small task, rigging-wise), and a war between Mecanim’s Animator and the BlendShapes themselves.  Put simply, this is something our team (as in, I) still fully intend to implement into the future of this game, but scoping this into the jam proved a little over-ambitious.  For now, our Druid hides his shapeshifting in a puff of magical particle effects as a (literal, I guess) smokescreen, simply swapping out the models.

Finally, we weren’t going to be saving anyone without some models of villagers to save, so I did my best to economize here, using a single sculpture that we could later adapt into both the male and female villager models, letting me reuse both the bulk of the sculpting time, and the rig itself.  That part ended up being a great idea, and a big time saver overall.  One walk and one run cycle, along with some idle animations, ended up getting us both our villagers and our Druid in one animation pass — and Mecanim made it easy to retarget those animations between the three models.

(And, while our enemies aren’t exactly implemented quite yet, the idea even from the beginning was that the enemies would be corrupted versions of your villagers — so these two, plus some dark and spooky textures, even gave us the stand-ins for our future villains.)

HotF-Villagers

The world itself was an ambitious step all in its own, including a lot of props (more than we thought we’d need originally, even) to bring a passable forest to life in only a weekend.  I ended up sculpting 2 different trees, treetop models, several stones, a fallen log, and mystical standing stones, all of which needed their own retopology and texture work.  See those below:

The tricky remaining sculptures

The result, thanks to some inspired texture work and really cool materials/shader work on our other team members’ parts (I’ll let them talk about that!), was something we were pretty happy with by the end of the jam:

HotF-Screenshot

The good news was: we got the basic idea implemented in time to start pulling everything together by late Monday evening.

The bad news was: I had been hoping I could also tackle the music for this jam, with at least a day or so’s worth of time to dedicate…  Yeah, that wasn’t happening.

So, switching gears with (I kid thee not, sadly) one hour left before the deadline, I plugged in my keyboard and did my best to drum/play out the song that I’d been trying to compose in my head for the three days leading up to that point.  In other words: I had about 45 minutes to write the game’s soundtrack (yikes!), starting from truly nothing.  That was a stressful moment, I’ll admit — but something about it seemed pretty fun as well.  (Sort of in the spirit of a game jam, too.)

So, while it’s far from the amount (or quality) of music I was hoping to make, I did get the chance to make at least this, our “Main Theme”:

I’m proud to say that we’re still hard at work on this game now, even three weeks later, and still hoping to turn this into something that matches the scale of our original vision.  For now, I’ll leave off with a teaser/preview image of what this has become in the meantime.

HotF-Update

Lastly — we also all wanted to say thank you all so much for your extremely kind (and very understanding!) feedback on our submission.  It ended up being only a quirky little prototype of what will hopefully someday be a pretty cool little game, but your feedback was really inspiring and has kept us going in the weeks since!

Thanks for reading, and we’d love to hear from you with thoughts, questions, or especially any last minute reviews!  Cheers!

Play our game here!

Last day to rate!

Posted by (twitter: @SantiHisteria)
Monday, May 9th, 2016 11:04 am

Today is the last day!!

…but you can still rate “Breaking Fat“: http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-35/?action=preview&uid=59433

:) GOOD LUCK WITH THE CLASSIFICATIONS GUYS! :)

Over 100 Votes For SHAPE.SHIFT()!!

Posted by (twitter: @xanjos)
Monday, May 9th, 2016 7:44 am

ld35102votes

Finally managed to achieve just over 100 votes for my entry SHAPE.SHIFT(). Once again, huge thanks to everyone who took the time to play and rate over the past three weeks 😀 .

Anyway, it’s the last day of judging but there’s still time to play/rate my game so if you haven’t tried it yet (Were you living under a rock or something?), you can do so by clicking here (Let’s see if we can get 110 or even 150 votes by the end of the day ;D).

Final 2 Days To Play SHAPE.SHIFT()!!

Posted by (twitter: @xanjos)
Sunday, May 8th, 2016 3:35 pm
Click the gif to play!!

Click the gif to play!!

Posting this now rather than tomorrow since most people will have work/school/whatever on Monday but there’s only two days of judging left and if you still haven’t played my entry SHAPE.SHIFT() yet, you can do so by clicking here (I’m literally one vote left away from reaching the 100 mark!!).

ld35votes99

Anyway, I’d like to thank all the victims people who went out and actually tried the game and once again, apologies for making such a ridiculously hard game ;D

neon:morph 2000 timelapse

Posted by
Saturday, May 7th, 2016 7:42 am

Here’s a timelapse of our team putting together neon:morph 2000!

You can play the game here!

neon:morph 2000

Post Mortem: A Mazeshift Title

Posted by
Friday, May 6th, 2016 9:57 am

Hi everyone,

This was my second Ludum Dare. Once again I had a fantastic time participating, and playing the other entries is a great source of pleasure and inspiration. I wrote a post mortem for my game A Mazeshift Title, which you can play here (Unity WebGL version available).

 

Screenshot1A Mazeshift Title

The Game

A Mazeshift Title is a 2D puzzle game where the player must construct a route between two endpoints using a collection of shapes organised in a grid. These shapes are manipulated by shifting entire rows horizontally, or columns vertically. It could easily be compared with a 2D version of a Rubik’s cube, with a pattern that must be completed. The game contains 7 individual levels, and each one is procedurally generated to provide a degree of replayability.

Development

The idea for the game was originally conceived from thinking about shifting bits in computer registers, but using shapes instead. A good three hours on the Saturday morning were spent settling on a design. I felt it was important to take the extra time at this stage to ensure the concept was both interesting and achievable. By the time I had stopped on the Saturday night, the game consisted of a single feature-complete level.

The focus of Sunday was polish: after creating some menus and finishing the transitions between different levels, I moved onto audio. I ended up spending many hours fighting with multiple software packages, and eventually only managed to produce three sound effects. I had initially anticipated having enough time to produce a simple ambient background music track, but this no longer seemed feasible. Some visual polish feature had also been planned, such as sliding the grid tiles when they are shifted, but sadly these also had to be cut.

The Good

  • Procedurally generated puzzles.
  • The mechanics are explained non-verbally using a trivial first level.
  • I followed my plan: the core mechanics were implemented by Saturday night, Sunday was spent polishing the game.

The Bad

  • No music.
  • Tiles don’t slide when shifted.

Thanks for reading, see you all next time!

3-Form timelapse

Posted by
Thursday, May 5th, 2016 1:11 pm

Here’s a timelapse of my seventh Ludum Dare game named 3-Form.

Entry page

If embedded video doesn’t work here’s a link

BF_Title

TRY TO FIND THE EVIL DOCTOR..

… ARE YOU READY? PLAY!

Thank you guys for all your rating and feedback!

[cache: storing page]