Posts Tagged ‘Unity 3D’

FDP corp present “Piece of meat”

Saturday, December 10th, 2016 7:13 pm

Hello everybody ! We are proud to be here one more time ! We are also proud to show you our work !

 

LD37 One Room :

FDP corp present “Piece of Meat” our second project under the ludum dare banner. We try to plan a puzzle tactical game around the industry theme with a lot of humour and fun. The game exploit a satiric view of our future.
Likes the first time we will try to finish it for the deadline.

 

Our team :

 

Jalibter as Main Dev

Dannou as Main Graphist

Bob as Graphist
JeanTapas as Compositor
MonsieurDuc as something usefull like a BOSS

 

Our consultant and helpers

Plexus as Dev and logic
Gribouille as Marketing and Event
Holyengine as Graphist

 

You can check our works there :
http://multitwitch.tv/dannou_gaming/jalibter/monsieurduc/holyengine

 

We working with :

We working on those software

Unity 5.4
blender
zbrush
maya
substance
adobe suite
fruity loops
notepad++

Feel free to ask your questions on our stream.

 

 

Piece of Meat the story :

 

In 2099 the growth of the human race became uncontrollable.
Overpopulation has become the biggest threat.
Humanity under the enlightened guidance of the FDP corp, has surrendered.
You play as a young factory manager, with one dream, change the world.

Your first mission will be to make a cheap and useful production system.

 

Some tease :

 

Story tease :

 

 

 

 

All the staff hope you enjoy it ! leave a comment if you want we will answer !
Streams are ONLINE ! you could check our work in progress.

 

A gift for creators, MultiGame for Unity

Posted by (twitter: @whendricso)
Saturday, January 23rd, 2016 5:59 pm

I’ve made something useful, and I want to share it with you :)

MultiGame

Click for the free version!

Unity is powerful, but hard to use for non-programmers. So, a drag-and-drop framework that eliminates the need for coding or visual logic editors, MultiGame is a comprehensive game development framework for Unity.

It’s easy. Want health? Add it. Inventory? Click. Combine objects and components together to control Unity itself directly. Full documentation is built in to the editor! Just click “help” on any MultiGame component, or hover your mouse over field names for a helpful hint. The full version of MultiGame includes over 130 components, and growing every week. Powerful Managed Message functionality lets MultiGame command any script component even if it’s not included with MultiGame! This free evaluation version contains a few dozen of the most useful components in MultiGame. You can even use this in commercial projects, free of charge! But, if you like MultiGame please send feedback!

MultiGame is intuitive. Use it’s robust Interaction system to receive events such as player input, triggers and collisions, broken joints and send Managed Messages using an intuitive and consistent interface.

MultiGame has an ever-expanding feature set and the full version already contains over 150 components including:

-Interaction system
-Robust Message Manager that can send commands to any script
-Motion for transforms and rigidbodies
-General game functionalities and scripts
-Modular AI system
-User created content and construction/destruction systems
-Animation systems
-Combat system including health, damage, projectiles, and melee with combos
-Inventory system
-Save/load preferences
-Save/load entire game to binary
-Multiplayer support with Photon Cloud
-Mecanim state machine behaviors (state machine visual scripting with Mecanim editor)
-Level and prefab generator (beta)

MultiGame is great for adventure, physics, tower defense, RTS, RPG, FPS, MMO, open world, action, racing, arcade, or really any real-time genre or combination of genres you can imagine.

I would appreciate your feedback before I go for the full release so please:

Get the free version now!

The Idea

Posted by
Saturday, August 22nd, 2015 2:15 am

After some thinking and a little playing around with a quick build, I’ve mostly solidified the game idea.

You play as the ghost of a dead crew member aboard a spaceship who has come back to haunt the living and destroy the ship, for reasons unknown (to you guys, anyway). It’s a fast FPS with things like bouncing bullets and multishot, might throw in some grenades or something too. The only problem so far is I’m not sure how to make it mean much. I mean, the premise is cool, but it doesn’t seem to affect the gameplay much. But I do have a few ideas…

I’m thinking perhaps your goal is to revive yourself and leave the ship while blowing it up. To this end there would be 3 things to do and the order would be somewhat up to you:

  1. Set the ship to self-destruct
  2. Revive yourself and become human
  3. Escape the ship

Obviously if you escape the ship before the others, you get a pretty bad ending because you didn’t kill everyone and you’re still a ghost. I’m thinking that as a ghost you can see/interact with certain things like platforms, powerups, and areas that you normally can’t, but perhaps as a human there are things you can do that you can’t as a ghost, like activate objects and open doors. When you sabotage the ship, it will start a countdown and if you don’t escape within that time you die, and the game ends (but you don’t necessarily fail!). So, you have two main paths; Revive yourself and then set the ship to destruct, or set it to destruct and then revive yourself. The first is risky because you can’t use as many safe options and can’t get as much combat advantage when you’re alive, the second is risky because you have to both revive AND escape in the time limit, instead of just escaping.

OK, I’ve sorted out my issues. I like where this has gone, and it’s what I’m sticking with. Thank you for reading, and good luck in the competition!

Night Harvest

Posted by (twitter: @ctbagameclub)
Monday, April 20th, 2015 6:52 pm

Participação da Equipe Gene-Z Team na Ludum Dare 32.

“NIGHT HARVEST”

Destroy the damned scarecrows who took care of his cornfield … For this use your sniper blood with seeds and call the bats to help you.

teste001

teste006

teste007

teste008

YOUTUBE PREVIEW

GOTO:

OFICIAL LUDUM DARE GAME PAGE

FACEBOOK

Programer / Game Design / Audio

Enzo Augusto Marchiorato

scarecrow_head

Art / Game Design

Jhonatan Souza Cordeiro

Pedemilho

Created in UNITY 3D

Soccer Cow!

Posted by (twitter: @MartianGames)
Monday, April 20th, 2015 3:57 am

Just a highlight video of progress from yesterday.. less than a day left until completion:

twitch.tv/martiangames/v/4169990 

I’m still programming, so Jenni is checking out the Ludum Dare streams on Twitch & saying hi .. she made the cow & found the moo fx for our submission!

MartianGames.com | twitch.tv/JenniNexus

We got out mic & live-streaming channels up recently so hope to see ya all around more soon!

Snowman Sumo Playable Build!

Posted by (twitter: @AtkinsSJ)
Sunday, December 7th, 2014 4:51 am

It’s the moment you’ve all been waiting for! Well, statistically none of you even know about this game, but that’s besides the point. 😉

Snowman Sumo is, well, a sumo game about snowmen. Roll around to grow in size, then use your increased heft to knock the other snowman off the island. Play against a friend, from the comfort of your browser window.

Click the screenshot to play!

Click the screenshot to play!

There’s still some polish to add – notably there’s no audio yet. I’d also like to add a mechanic where collisions knock snow off both of you, but I’ll see if I get to that.

Oh jeez I am doing this.

Posted by (twitter: @TyrusPeace)
Saturday, December 6th, 2014 2:00 am

I really should be working on Cloudbase Prime right now. But this topic! I got indignant! “Entire Game on One Screen”, you say? Trying to dictate game design via a Ludum Dare topic, voters? I scoff at thee. I scoff. I’ll show you one screen.

Initial technology test after figuring out how RenderTextures work in Unity:

Yes, I made a gif of a Vine because I couldn’t figure out how to embed it. That is a real thing I did.

The rest of today was spent fiddling getting the basic tech of being able to bring up your screen and then click things on it while viewing the world through it. This was tricky because I had to figure out the position in the world the mouse was at on the screen according to the player’s camera, and then translate that to pixel coordinates for the *screen’s* camera, and then dance a jig when the whole stupid thing actually worked.

You can bring up your screen and activate/deactivate things to bring them into the “real” world in game now. Yay!

Once things are activated they can collide/fall/etc. Hopefully I can come up with some interesting puzzles for this.

Star Trucker – post mortem

Posted by (twitter: @joaoguerra)
Sunday, August 31st, 2014 12:47 pm

This was the first Ludum Dare I participated and I wasn’t even supposed to do so. I wanted to. I thought about it. But didn’t try to organize anything with anyone that would complement my skills before the weekend.

I basically got inspired by a friend of mine who is learning how to code and that was going to participate by herself, and I started thinking on what I could do with little time (I had a busy weekend) and very little art (my artistic skills are severly challenged).

So I came up with Star Trucker:

planets! galaxies! relevant title screen image.

 

It’s kind of a slow paced minimalistic resource balancing simulator that you’ll fail at (get those genre defining buzzwords in).

Although it starts very slowly and admitedly potentially boring, it ramps up difficulty quite nicely to a point where everything gets a bit hectic. Succeeding at keeping that hecticness steady until the player eventually drops the ball due to having to juggle a bunch of planets and transports at the same time. There’s no winning condition.

 

here, have a screenshot.

 

I’m quite happy with how it turned out. It’s definitely a higher quality product that I usually manage at game jams and I think that that had all to do with the limitations I knew I had going in (lack of time and lack of art). This forced me to come up with a very basic concept whose mechanics were as simple as they could be. Thanks to that, I managed to get the core game loop working in a handful of hours which allowed me to take some time to draw the planets, pay attention to player feedback and deliver those tiny bits of polish that make a huge difference. There’s some balancing and tweaking to be done, for sure, but the more I worked on it, the more I felt that this was a concept with room to grow.

Inevitably, I started thinking on how this could be developed further and I started outlining a couple of new features that could add depth to the game. I was keen on doing more with this concept and the next couple of days gave me the motivation I needed. I don’t know if people are just being really nice, but everyone’s feedback has been incredibly positive and the ideas that have been thrown at me have been helping me a lot in shaping the direction of where I’m going to try to take the game.

Thanks to everyone that has tried the game and that has been giving me invaluable feedback and ideas. Please keep them coming. :)

 

The vision for Star Trucker is lining up to be something that is right up my alley and I’m quite keen to see how far the mechanics can be pushed and how much depth can be added to it. I’m confident that I can make something good out of this.

I’ll be updating my blog (half-done games) with progress on the game. If you’re interested, follow it or my twitter feed. :)

Thank you for reading.

Parallel Horizons

Posted by (twitter: @kebabskal)
Sunday, August 24th, 2014 3:06 pm

My compo entry is a puzzle platformer with hand painted graphics.

I used Unity to create the game, Photoshop to paint and Cubase, some synths and my mouth for sound effects.

Unfortunately, I didn’t have time to finish the music.

I managed to finish 8 levels ranging from easy to rather tricky.
It’s possible to get stuck in places, press Enter to restart the map.

There is no progress saving etc, but once you know how, you can finish the game in a minute or so, so shouldn’t be a big deal.

Made on a Mac so Windows and Linux are completely untested, but should work.

All in all, a pretty successful weekend.

Let me know what you think!

Download and vote here.

Parallel Horizons

Gameplay GIF

 

Hey unity devs! please export to linux!

Posted by
Tuesday, May 13th, 2014 5:25 pm

This is a reminder to unity developers, there is NO webplayer for linux(yet?) so please, make a linux build, its not that hard =).

Linux users like to play games too!

Simple instructions to build for linux:
http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/2013/12/24/unity-export-for-linux/
http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/2013/12/28/unity-export-for-linux-addendum-64-bit/

Lovely Bullets (Post Mortem)

Posted by (twitter: @lightspeedlucas)
Monday, December 16th, 2013 1:25 pm

Lovely Bullets

Conception

It was my first time using Unity in a LD, so I thought I might as well try something bigger than I normally do. So I chose a FPS since I had never made one before. First (obvious) idea that came to mind was limiting the ammo to a single bullet, but the thought of getting back that bullet is weird. Then I thought of using a bow as a weapon, so that getting the single arrow back would be understandable. I kept that idea until the end of the first day, when I decided to make the game funnier: the gun was back and its single bullet too. What happens when it’s fired? The obvious: you start throwing your gun at stuff. There were also little robots as enemies before, scrapped that in favor of devilishly cute floating targets. I find quotes that appear when you die very annoying, so I had to put them in my first FPS of course.

Difficulties

The outlined walls were a pain. The default Unity Toon shaders did not work properly and every single outline shader I found had annoying problems. In the end I managed to adjust one to my needs and, thankfully, it fit nicely. Unity collision system was also a pain. The gun kept going through walls even with continous collision enabled (???). Fixed that by making the static colliders really really thick, horribly hacky. Fun fact: There are no floor or ceiling meshes in the game, it’s just the viewport clear color. Music had its frustrations as well. I tried Terry’s Bosca Ceoil first but couldn’t compose anything good. The final, almost silent, bgm is from Autotracker.

Conclusion

Unity is great for making games quickly as long as they’re simple and, most importantly, as long as you know its flaws (and they’re many). I’m proud of the result, my most fun LD game so far. Still lots of polishing to do though. You can play my game, Lovely Bullets, here.

Tumbling Towers: Milestone Build – Feature Complete(?)!

Posted by (twitter: @nick_mudry)
Saturday, December 14th, 2013 5:51 pm

It hit my milestone for the entire jam, which was to get the core mechanics of my game working. I’d say at this point what I wanted from the game is 100% done. I’m taking a well deserved break before getting back at it later tonight.

What is the game you might ask? 

Tumbling towers is a game where you only have one direction to build, up. You also can only choose one material to build with: Wood, Ice, or Stone.

Each material has their own attributes (weight, friction, and more). The goal is to build the tallest tower you can!

Right now you can find links to play the web version of the game on the game’s page on the site here: http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-28/?action=preview&uid=22629.

(Also, an improperly scaled Android version is posted as I work on making it look nice.)

What’s left? Well, I want to make the UI more usable. MUCH more usable. Also, a friend of mine should be helping me out tonight when it comes to art, so it might become a Ludum Jam entry instead.

Oh. When I’m back at it, my stream will be live on Twitch.TV too. Feel free to check it out (hit follow now so you get notified when I go live again), head to Twitch.TV/AngryFacing. Until I’m live again, check out this recorded YouTube video of me talking about the game’s progress. :)

Finally, development updates of this and my 1GAM project will be on my Twitter at @AngryFacing. Feel free to follow! :)

My First Game – Then and Now

Posted by
Friday, November 29th, 2013 3:24 pm

Last journal post until I actually make some progress, I swear!

After making a long post about my choice in game engines and then another explaining where my original game concept came from, I’m going to, finally, explain the history of my first game’s development. In brief, I hope.

Heartbreak version 1: Unity 3D for Windows

Original Heartbreak game, made in Unity3D

As you can probably see, the game is very flawed. One major issue was with the controls, which were tied to the mouse, so moving the mouse left and right caused the ring to spin. Hitting left mouse button would fire the balls from the central heart. On top of that, the game itself is bugged. At the eleventh hour, we discovered a bug on the fourth or fifth level that would cause the score to reset to 0 after the player had progressed to the following level. Finally, at the time I made a big deal out of “elegance of design”, which I saw as every part of a game coming together to compliment everything else.

Don’t get me wrong–elegance of design is a good thing, but I may have taken it a bit too far by creating a menu system that you could literally “lose” at (by accidentally selecting the exit button), in the interest of turning even the menu screen into a gameplay tutorial. I think I had seen one too many episodes of Sequelitis.

After the 2013 Game Jam, I was excited to try my hand at game programming, since I’d been only the lead designer for the original Heartbreak. I wanted to learn the craft of programming for myself, in the interest of being more self-sufficient. To that end, I decided to start as “simple” as possible and got into programming for the Atari 2600. Yes, the real Atari 2600.

If it’s a bit debatable whether or not I technically “made” Heartbreak version 1, since I was really just directing a Unity 3D programmer in what to do, I consider my actual first game to be my first remake of Heartbreak for the Atari 2600. I used the homebrew tool Visual Batari Basic, which, when combined with Batari Basic, gave me a convenient and simple IDE with many helpful sprite and sound design tools, plus the ability to code in BASIC and use a pre-made kernel, rather than coding everything directly in 6502 Assembly. I was extremely grateful for that.

Heartbreak version 2: Visual Batari Basic for Atari 2600

Prototype Heartbreak game, made in Visual Batari Basic for the Atari 2600

It took me a couple months to actually make Heartbreak for the 2600, since I was learning along the way and frequently had to go back and reprogram bits of code here and there as I discovered more efficient ways to organize the game logic. Keep in mind this was all done for a system with a 1.19Mhz processor and 128 bytes (yes, individual bytes) of memory (only 26 bytes of which were available to me in Batari Basic, since the kernel I used consumed the rest of it to write the playfield to the screen).

In the end, it was again thanks to a more experienced programmer, who generously wrote a custom kernel for me, that Heartbreak was able to function well on the 2600. Normally, using Batari Basic’s standard kernel, only a single playfield color can be displayed on-screen per playfield pixel (those big, rectangular blocks), but the programmer managed to work around that limitation with some clever 6502 Assembly wizardry that I still don’t fully comprehend.

From the custom kernel as a framework, I was able to build the finished game. Some months later, I revisited my old code and cleaned it up, organizing everything into neat, clean functions that you can view here. I’m rather proud of how tidy and efficient it all is (relatively, keeping in mind that this is BASIC with 6502 Assembly calls in it, all programmed in non-object oriented in a language that relies on spaghetti code). The game itself only uses about 1000 out of ~3000 CPU cycles that are available with this particular kernel, and the game itself is under 4 kilobytes. And, yes, it works on a real Atari 2600. If you’d like to try for yourself, I included Heartbreak, with a few other small games I developed for the Atari 2600, in a 32k compilation ROM (along with an updated version of my previous LD, Ping) that you can get here (you’ll need an emulator such as Stella to run it, unless you have a real 2600 with a Harmony cartridge), and you can see the finished version of the game below.

There have been a number of gameplay changes since the Unity3D and earlier 2600 versions.

Heartbreak version 3: GameMaker for Mobile

Originally, the player had to hit a button (joystick fire on the 2600, spacebar or left mouse on Windows) to fire a new ball from the heart. The ball would take on the color of the heart and it had to either match the block’s primary color or be one of the primary colors that made up the block’s color, or else the player would lose a life (indicated by the size of the central heart). Hitting a wrong block three times meant game over, but the player’s heart would be brought back up to full size after every stage.

Once I’d finished the basic game on the 2600, I was seeking to program in alternative gameplay modes, since alternate modes were a thing with many 2600 games. One of those modes included a bouncing ball, so rather than the player having to spawn each ball (which would fire from the heart and then disappear once it had stricken a block), the player only had to press the fire button when they wanted to transfer the heart’s current color to the ball. This meant a lot less button mashing, and it was far more satisfying to just control the blocks to catch the ball as it bounced. This ended up being the only game mode in later versions.

With the block colors, I’d always intended the game to start with simple primaries–Red, Yellow, and Blue, and work up to secondaries–Orange, Green, and Purple–and finally to White and Black. White blocks would give you a heart back, but black would take away a heart if they were struck and had to be avoided, which was particularly challenging in the 2600 version, because the background is solid black as well.

However, this lead to the game becoming progressively easier, since an orange block could be broken by either a red or a yellow ball, a green with yellow or blue, and a purple with red or blue. Obviously, a game should get more challenging over time, not less. I fixed this in the 2600 version by having the ball remove a color from the block’s color, leaving the remaining colors in its wake. For instance, if a red ball hits an orange block, it bounces off and leaves a yellow block behind, which must then be broken by a yellow ball. And if the orange block was hit by a yellow ball, it would bounce off leaving the block red. Yellow blocks would need to be hit by all three primary colors before they would disappear.

Overall, I’m very pleased with how the game itself plays as of the final 2600 version, but a few things had to be sacrificed in the move to the 2600’s limited hardware.

For one, the ball will only bounce at a few pre-determined angles, as letting it bounce freely would result in the ball always getting lost, particularly since the blocks aren’t of uniform shape and they don’t fully encircle the central heart.

Additionally, there was no way to add multiple concentric circles to the game, so it always operates on a single ring. I would very much like the game to have up to three or four rings at a time, as in the original Unity3D version.

Finally, I always intended the game to be a musical arcade game, but having background music wasn’t feasible with the 4 kilobyte size limit of the 2600’s ROM. I would like to bring a musical quality back into the game, with the heartbeat matching the tempo of the current soundtrack, rather than set to a steady, heart-beating sound effect.

On top of all that, I’d also like to bring the game to a mobile setting, which I think would fit the gameplay very well, being a sort of casual game that works best in just a few moments played at a time. This would, of course, mean reconsidering the control scheme. I would like a simple swipe gesture to allow the ring to spin, perhaps with a simple tap used to set the ball’s current color to the color displayed by the heart.

On the other hand, I may modify that mechanic so that the heart does not change colors on its own, but instead must be tapped by the player in order to change the ball’s color. Or maybe the heart and ball always share the same color and, rather than tapping at the right moment to get the right color on the ball, the player would need to tap the heart to swap between its colors? We’ll see.

While I’m at it, I’d like to update the game’s visual style, maybe moving away from the direct pixel-art look into something a bit cleaner. And, who knows–if I find the time, maybe I’ll try implementing some kind of power-up system, similar to Arkanoid. I may have an idea of how it could work.

Now it’s (finally) time to get to started!

A Story of Hearbreak

Posted by
Friday, November 29th, 2013 1:34 pm

As mentioned in my previous journal entry, I will be remaking my first game, Heartbreak. It’s a bit of a strange tale, however, since Heartbreak wasn’t originally “made” by me at all, at least in the sense of programming. It was my baby design-wise and in the limited capacity of “art,” but I relied on another programmer to do all the actual creation. Still, I think that it will count fine for the sake of this mini-Dare. It’s either that, or Ping.

The game was originally made for the 2013 Game Jam (the same one that produced Surgeon Simulator 2013). It was my first time ever attempting to make a game, and I was nervous of the possibility of having no ideas. There were about 200 students packed into a lecture hall (which very much surprised me, as our university isn’t particularly large) when we were all given the theme for the Game Jam: the sound of a beating heart. We broke off into 15-20 person groups and went into separate classrooms to brainstorm.

This was my first experience with brainstorming, and I loved it. There were dozens of great ideas thrown around, my contribution being an idea for a point and click adventure game set inside a dystopian, film-noir crumbling city that was located in someone’s body, with a large, pulsating heart looming in the background. It was supposed to be a story about survival and dealing with impeding death, etc. Not a very good idea for a 3-day game jam.

Then, someone in our brainstorming group suggested a game consisting of a number of arcade-style mini-games. Although I cannot guess why, for some reason Heartbreak–a mix-up of the classic arcade game Breakout where the player controls the blocks instead of a ball, with the blocks arranged in a circle around a beating heart that serves as the player’s life counter–sprung immediately to mind. I abandoned the over-complicated concept of a point-and-click adventure game and clung to this new concept.

When we returned to the lecture hall and game creators began separating to work on individual games, I found myself almost working alone, since my concept of an arcade game about moving colorful blocks around a heart sprite didn’t quite grab attention in the same way that some of the other concepts did, but I managed to hook a couple people who claimed to be experienced with programming in GameMaker. With that, we all broke up again into different classrooms to begin constructing the games we’d gone with. My group was, by far, the smallest, with most groups having 6 to 10 people on a team, and I with just 3.

The two programmers set to work surfing the Internet and half-heartedly (forgive the pun) looking up tutorials while I fiddled with some sprite art and designed the game in my head. That’s how most of the first evening was spent–simply thinking while I worked. By the next day, after a short sleep and a lot of fitful half-awakedness, the game, simple as it was, was fully-formed in my mind.

The only remaining problem was that the two programmers claimed that the concept couldn’t be done in GameMaker (something I intend to prove wrong during this mini-LD), and so our little team was stalled for a few hours until a very nice and quite talented Unity3D programmer stepped in to join our group and get us on the right track. Said programmer made the game in Unity entirely on his own, with me hovering over his shoulder like a fussy mother, directing every aspect of the game’s design.

To cut an already too-long story short, our little four-person team (the two GM programmers were delegated to sound work, which meant searching Newgrounds for some music tracks and finding a few arcade-like sound effects) ended up winning “best designed game” for the Game Jam at our university, as well as “most popular” among all those students at our university who participated. A humble honor that was all thanks to the nice programmer who stepped in to make the game for me. It fired off a brand new interest in game development that I’d not really had before, and I’m still waiting to see exactly how far it will take me.

October Challenge – Emergency Landing Disaster

Posted by (twitter: @DMTSource)
Friday, November 29th, 2013 10:39 am

A big thank you to Ludum Dare and the October Challenge 2013. My hastily made game has shown me the feasibility of the freemium/ad model on mobile.

The goal of the challenge was to create a game within the month, release it, and make a $1. I had hardly managed that, but since the end of the contest I have seen $480.94(40,786 downloads) in ad revenue on Android, and $260.08(17,797 downloads) on IOS, which was only released a week ago.  Ios, so far, seems to be a more profitable platform for such a game. We will see as time goes on.  I currently use Admob and Chartboost to serve smartbanner and interstitial ads to monetize my games.

While improving the game is on my list of things to do, I believe its clear that increasing my Unity game portfolio will drastically increase my ability to generate ad revenue. I already have a second flight sim in the workings among other projects that I hope to bring to IOS, then Android, and then finally OUYA(no ads, in app purchase model only).

Entry Page

Play it Free on IOS

Play it Free on Android

Play it Free on Amazon

Screenshot_2013-10-28-15-07-28

Emergency Landing Disaster FREE on Google Play

Posted by (twitter: @DMTSource)
Wednesday, November 6th, 2013 7:43 pm

Hey guys, check out my October Challenge submission page for Emergency Landing Disaster and download it free today on Google Play!

Mayday Mayday! Prepare for trouble in the turbulent skies of Emergency Landing Disaster. Featuring realistic flight simulation for mobile. Now with tilt and touch controls available!

Come rain or shine, these airliners are crashing. Hard. Can you land safely? No?! Well let’s see how many pieces you can get to the airport. I’m sure it will be fine!

Ok… So it wasn’t fine. But hey, with free missions and the biggest airplanes in the sky, who isn’t going to enjoy Emergency Landing Disaster? I would imagine the passengers. We forgot about them again.

FEATURES:
* Flight simulator with realistic aerofoil and control surfaces. You wont believe the flight realism!
* Realistic flight models! A physics based flight simulator made by pilots for pilots.
* Both touch screen controls and tilt controls allow you to play the way you like.
* 4 free harrowing landing scenarios. More coming soon at NO COST!
* All content is FREE, no paid upgrades or in game purchases to slow you down.
* Intense 3D graphics and NVIDIA PhysX ready to put you into the skies! Powered by Unity Pro & UnityFS.

CHECK IT OUT FOR FREE ON GOOGLE PLAY NOW!

Emergency Landing Disaster

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