Posts Tagged ‘timelapse’

Cardboard Drift timelapse

Posted by
Saturday, December 31st, 2016 2:56 pm

one rooms post mortem

Posted by (twitter: @AurelDev)
Sunday, December 25th, 2016 8:02 am

PLAY ONE ROOMS

(this is a mirror of the same post mortem on my website)

It was that time of the year again! For Ludum Dare 37, I made a 2.5D point ‘n click adventure in 72 hours – one rooms. I also skipped one night completely, opting to work for 40+ hours without any sleep whatsoever. Here’s how everything went down …

The preparations

The week before this LD was somewhat busy for me still, because university. Mostly because of that, I didn’t prepare as well. I didn’t make a super customised wallpaper with different text for every theme possible, I didn’t make 9 of them for each one of my virtual desktops, I didn’t test my libraries. I did make a super quick wallpaper that you might see in the timelapse. Basically, I was not planning to do something very experimental. It was going to be another game made in Haxe, compiled to flash. Oh well.

I was also looking forward to seeing the new Ludum Dare page. But then, a week before the actual event, I realised it’s just not going to happen with the current progress. So, surprise, surprise, everything was done on the old Ludum Dare page which has bugs and issues, obviously, but is still much more reliable than a system ‘finished’ and launched without any alpha testing. Oh well #2.

Unlike most previous LD’s, I did not have a definite favourite among the final round of themes. These were my votes:

While I know that the event is growing larger all the time, the duplicate themes are getting old. Chain reaction is the only one marked, but ‘Small world’ is pretty much the same as ‘Tiny world’ (LD 23), then ‘Simplicity’ / ‘Minimalism’ (LD 26), ‘Wait, are we the bad guys?’ / ‘You are the Villain’ (LD 25), etc. And of course, the theme that was finally chosen, ‘One room’, was very exactly the way I interpreted ‘Entire Game on One Screen’ (LD 31), so it wasn’t my favourite. Oh well #3.

The concept

I woke up on Saturday (after going to sleep one hour before the theme was announced, silly me) somewhat late, and saw the theme. One of the first things I thought of was a rogue-like exploration / role-playing game – you, the player, control a boat / spaceship / caravan which is the one room. But because it is also a vehicle, you can control your one room and go places. Explore the sea / space / desert. It is a simple concept which can be taken in various directions. The game would also be quite difficult to finish, but I was up to the challenge. I was already considering going for the jam, so the extra 24 hours would definitely help here.

(I didn’t choose this interpretation in the end, but there are some that have done so, for example: 13 Jellyfish by Four Quarters – pretty game)

So, as we were brainstorming with my girlfriend, don’t ask me how, I thought of approaching the theme a bit differently – to have a room that ends with -one room. Then she suggested a game where you try to think of various -one rooms. And then, feeling ambitious, I thought of a full story to go with that. I already knew it would be a lot of work to even have various rooms, without even thinking of an actual story.

Poor man’s 3D engine

And so the idea was born. Then it was time to think of how to make the game look. I already experimented with pixel art / 3D fusion in Cell #327, although it seems like an overly-complicated way to make little bits of the room move. I didn’t really use it to its fullest potential. So this time around, I opted for simpler graphics, with the 2.5D effect of the spinning room being the highlight. The graphics ‘engine’ involved some basic lingebra, z-buffering, pixel-by-pixel blitting, but I suppose that deserves an article of its own!

72 hours again, music, voice acting

I was quite happy with my progress. Creating new rooms took a lot of time, because creating a user-friendly editor to place walls and floors in 3D would take even longer. By the second day I knew I didn’t have that much ready content-wise, but I didn’t panic and decided to keep going and submit a jam entry instead.

I had no idea what music I would have, or how I would make it, and having a jam entry allowed me to ask somebody friendly on the LD IRC chat. The request was fulfilled by ibispi, who promptly made Earthbound-sounding chiptune music for all the rooms. That added a lot of personality to the game. I would have gone for darker-sounding music, but I reconsidered, seeing as my game was rather light-hearted, with lots of quote unquote humour in the writing.

I also thought of asking Elijah Lucian to give voice to my game, as he did for Cell #327. He wanted to help, but couldn’t make it before the jam deadline, unfortunately. Right after the jam, however, he was hosting a voice acting stream on twitch. It was quite fun watching people try to act out some of the more unusual parts of the script (the actual voice acting starts around 01:11:00). He also promised to have the game voice acted post-jam. And I want to polish it plenty before that, and add some content – more rooms, more puzzles, more fun.

Sleep deprivation

As I’ve already mentioned in the beginning, I’ve skipped the second night entirely. I worked till 3 in the morning, then thought I might as well try to pull an all nighter. Maybe it gets better when you get used to it, but sleep deprivation is kinda scary. Monday morning was especially challenging. I tried to keep working, but I would keep falling asleep mid-work. Writing simple lines of code would merge with my dreams. I would have my eyes open, but I can’t say I was awake. Trains of thought were derailing left and right. It actually got better in the afternoon, and I was insane enough to stay up till 3 in the morning again. Watching Elijah’s stream of course.

I guess if there is an advantage to skipping a night (apart from the obvious additional working time), it would have to be the, er … ‘creative’ ideas you get. So that’s how the singing skeleton quartriplet and the late shift arcade got in the game.

The menu

The menu in this game was heavily inspired by the GUI in Mass Ef– Just kidding! I meant the food:

Also some muffins, pistachios, you get the idea. Good food management is crucial for a successful LD entry.

A javascript port

You might notice there is a playable javascript version this time around. I ported the game because some people complained that it’s hard to get it running on linux, and that flash is a dying platform anyway. Which is true, I suppose. So, post-jam, I ported the game. It took me a day, but I was quite happy, because the majority of changes were made in my libraries (which were basically used as a wrapper around the flash API), not the game itself. Meaning I can make a javascript build of my games to come much faster. Yay.

Some mistakes

As always, there are some things I should have done differently. Obviously there should have been many more rooms, at least some lines of dialogue for them. Writing those would have taken minutes, so really there is no excuse.

The palette I chose was 20 colours. Most of it worked out pretty well, but for some reason I chose a colour very similar to another that I never managed to use in the game. If I had taken some time balancing the palette more, the resulting graphical style would probably end up different as well. Probably more moody, as my games tend to be.

The faux 3D, while looking pretty, is also not very nice on the CPU. The javascript version suffers from this much more, but even the flash version gets my (admittedly quite old) computer spinning up its fans. I could have optimised this in many ways still, and I hope I will get to that for the post-jam version. Technically it should be doable with a shader, but I didn’t feel brave enough to write my first shader during LD.

Conclusion

And that’s about it. I will write another article about the way the rooms are rendered, and hopefully another article when there’s a post-jam version. Overall, I am very happy with my game, and I hope you enjoy it too!

PLAY ONE ROOMS

Update: timelapse

Glitch Room Timelapse

Posted by (twitter: @Hugo__Veille)
Thursday, December 15th, 2016 4:16 pm

Hey, If you want to see the timelapse of Glitch Room. My first entry in the Ludum Dare:

And If you want to play it’s here : Glitch Room

Free the Frog development time lapse

Posted by (twitter: @GaTechGrad)
Thursday, December 15th, 2016 11:07 am

Here is the time lapse development video for the game that I developed for Ludum Dare 37 called Free the Frog.  You must help Froggy avoid the obstacles and escape the rooms.

Ludum Dare entry

Get it on Itch.io | Get it on GameJolt

Full development stream archive

“Super Battle Cycle” Timelapse

Posted by (twitter: @PowerSparkGames)
Wednesday, December 14th, 2016 5:26 pm

gif-a01

Hey everyone, now that the submissions are in, I thought I’d upload Super Battle Cycle’s timelapse video. Take a look (it’s a short video), and if you want to play the entry, go ahead and do so please 😀

I hope you find it interesting.

Play Here (Web)

Thanks!

The most productive LD37 moments (timelapse)

Wednesday, December 14th, 2016 10:03 am

Browsing main page of course!

LD37 Volcanic Giraffe
*scroll* *scroll* *scroll*

I like how I stuck on some posts eventually.

But the rest of the time it looks simply like this:
LD37 Volcanic Giraffe

The results if you interested :)

Time Lapse Video

Posted by
Tuesday, December 13th, 2016 1:03 am

Hey, hope you are all recovering from the weekend :)

I added a time lapse video of the making of my compo entry Space Junk:

You can play the game (Web browser and PC download) here:

SPACE JUNK by Imphenzia

LD37_Screenshot_01

 

Have a continued great week!

 

Timelapse is up!

Posted by
Monday, December 12th, 2016 12:16 pm

View post on imgur.com

Here’s the timelapse of my entry:

And here’s the final result: http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-37/?action=preview&uid=61896

Been streaming work almost non-stop. Check us out over @ multitwitch.tv/holofire/123gas321 when we’re live!

Until then, here’s a time-lapse of the day.

Time for me to sleep. Peace.

Guild Inc timelapse

Posted by
Sunday, September 18th, 2016 12:40 am

Some retrospective (LD36)

Thursday, September 8th, 2016 5:10 pm

Glad to see so many timelapse videos and backstage stories.

We’ve created a special logbook page to share our process timeline.

DAY 1 – 2:00 PM
Ancient Contact Game
Looks promising, right?

I think it starts always the same — just a canvas where you can draw some shapes without actual sprites and animations.

DAY 1 – 4:00 PM
Ancient Contact Game
Pure happiness — when you can move your rectangle with a keyboard

Game supports both mouse and keyboard control — it wasn’t planned initially and we spent some extra time on this. I didn’t realize that input method is an important part of planning and game design.

DAY 1 – 8:00 PM
Ancient Contact Game
Magnetic beam still requires some tuning

At this point we came to the conclusion that the surface must be flat. These small hills require some additional tweaks in the AI and movement code — not so easy for 72 hours.

DAY 2 – 1:00 AM
Ancient Contact Game
And you call this a GAME?!

Polishing, balancing and testing — good ol’ time-consuming friends.

Submission Time:
Ancient Contact Game
Finally.

Share more stories about the process, guys!

Timelapse (and source) for R. Lastey!

Posted by (twitter: @AurelDev)
Wednesday, September 7th, 2016 5:13 am

Finally got around to releasing the source and the timelapse for my game – with some nice music by DDRKirby(ISQ)! :)

And the source is available here! Or …

PLAY R. LASTEY

Burning Light – Post Mortem

Posted by (twitter: @SirGFM)
Friday, September 2nd, 2016 5:48 am

It’s time to look back on how the making of ‘Burning Light’ went. I’ve compiled an annotated timelapse with most of the development:

Quick note: even though I took part of the compo, since it started Friday, 10 P.M, I actually divided my time into three logical days.

As usual, it took me all of the “first” day to come up with an idea. Before giving up and going to sleep, I decided to post my progress here. As I properly described my ideas, I had a new one that was of my liking.

As soon as the “second” day started, I quickly decided on the overall look of the game. Once again, I’ve used the DB32 palette, which has been my default palette for some time. Because of that, I feel like this game looks a lot like my previous entries, specially with LD32’s Kitten.

DB32 palette

Although I decided on doing a quick prototype, I actually failed pretty badly at that… Because of a dumb bug (and because I wouldn’t give up on mathematical correctness over simply finishing something) that took me around 6 hours to fix, I wasn’t done with the prototype until the end of the first 24 hours. By that time, I had no other choice but to go with the idea…

burning_light_001

Luckily, whenever I to took a break, I would either play the guitar or draw something. So even though I was running quite late, I also had already done most of the graphics. But I had no actual gameplay… And I didn’t have time to add sounds/music…

burning_light_002_x2

I woke up early on the last day and start to draw the UI and the player. From that, building that initial mock into a game was somewhat easy… until the final few hours.

When I started to create the level, I began to notice lots of corner cases. I tried to avoid them and come up with a neat level design, but I couldn’t do it. Eventually, I simply gave up a created a simple and short level.

30 minutes before the deadline, I had finished something (questionably) playable, so I began to package everything. I must say that my workflow for building is really effective. I quickly built a fully packaged game (with all required libs) for both Linux and Windows.

Overall, even though my game was way simpler (and buggier) than It could had been, I’m quite happy with the results. I may do a quick post-compo version, since I’d like to enhance my library’s collision detection… We’ll see…

Now (well, when I get back from work XD), I’ll go back to playing and commenting on games! o/

Ancient Adventure Post Mortem and Time lapse

Posted by (twitter: @GaTechGrad)
Friday, September 2nd, 2016 1:33 am

This post mortem was originally posted on my site at http://levidsmith.com/ancient-adventure/

I really pushed myself to the limit for this Ludum Dare 36 game development competition. Looking back at the length of time for all of my live streams on YouTube, I calculated that I spent over 22 hours of development time over two days for this event.  Since there is no voting or rankings this time, I felt more encouraged to do my best work since my game will only be played by those who genuinely want to play the game.  The game that I developed is called Ancient Adventure, which has gameplay based on classic adventure style games.

The premise of the game basically came from some of my discussion points on the latest episode of the Knoxville Game Design chat podcast, which I am a frequent contributor.  On that podcast, we discussed Anodyne, and I made several points about how they got the classic Zelda formula wrong.  The following is a list of some of the points that I made, and how I implemented those in Ancient Adventure.

A “compass” upgrade showing where the key items are located.

I created a compass item, which I call the all seeing eye which displays on the mini-map the location (in red) of all of the collectible artifacts.  With the mini-map for this game, I tried to make my map more intuitive, by having all of the rooms grayed out initially, and the rooms that the player has visited in a brighter shade of gray.  The player’s current position is highlighted in green.

Keeping with the ancient Egyptian theme, I used the classic eye hieroglyphic.  It’s the eye that is a popular tatoo and similar to the mage symbol in World of Warcraft.  After some research, I found that this is actually called the “Eye of Horus”, which is a symbol of health and protection.  The full myth of Horus can be read on Wikipedia.  Ironically, the Eye of Providence, which is depicted on top of a pyramid and on the back of the United States dollar bill, has nothing to do with Egyptian mythology.  Using this theme made me wonder why there are relatively few games and movies based on Egyptian mythology, since there are numerous games based on Norse and Greek mythology.  The only game that comes to mind is Age of Mythology, which is actually based on a collection of ancient religions.  There seems to be a lot of untapped material in Egyptian mythology which could be made into games.  In the English language, we named our planets based on Roman gods and the days of the weeks based on Norse gods.  The best known reference to Egyptian mythology in our culture is probably the Steve Martin King Tut sketch on Saturday Night Live.  I wonder if Egyptian mythology has been written out of our history because the culture was overly oppressive, using slavery to build pyramids to their gods, which was at odds with the Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam).  I will admit that I would have never made a game based on ancient Egyptian culture, if it had not been for the “Ancient Technology” theme for this Ludum Dare.

The point of gathering collectibles.

I used the Egyptian Ankh as the ancient artifact that must be collected to become the supreme being.  It is a quick and simple objective and story, but it is at least something that gives a little exposition of the game.  I just had in my mind one of the typical gods from Egyptian mythology, who has the head of a dog-like creature and the body of the human.  Since there were many Egyptian gods, collecting these artifacts would turn you into the “supreme being”.  It’s not a very noble objective, but I think it’s something players can wrap their heads around, since many ancient myths are about gods fighting each other to become the strongest and most powerful.  Again, after some research about the ankh, I learned that it is actually a symbol of life.  So if I had it to do over again, I probably would have made the ankh the symbol used for the health meter (i.e. “hearts” in Zelda) and made the collectible something different.  In this game, the health meter is represented by a bird creature (at least that’s what I intended it to look like) which was used in many Egyptian hieroglyphs.  The important thing was to have a symbol which was symmetric, since I intended to split the icon in half to represent a half unit of health remaining.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have enough time to represent half health units, so I just doubled the number of full health units.  Under the hood, the health value is just an integer anyway.

 

ancientadventure002I tried to ensure that all of the collectibles were spread evenly across all of the rooms.  The right side of the map is heavy on ancient artifacts.  This is balanced by having the staff upgrade on the left side of the map.  It is possible to gather the artifacts without getting the staff upgrade, but having the upgrade makes completing the game much easier.  Also the all seeing eye item is in the first room to the left, making it an item that should be picked up early in the game to assist with finding the ancient artifacts, which is the primary goal of the game.  I put the all seeing eye in the room to the left, since players of the classic Zelda game are accustomed to starting out left being a dead end.

How to tell if you have collected all of the required items in a level.

Below the health meter, the number of ancient artifacts (ankhs) the player has collected is displayed.  The icons are initially displayed as blacked out, which reinforces to the player that there are eight to collect.  As the items are collected, they are filled with the purplish color that I decided to use for the ancient artifact item.  For the pickup in the game world, I used the same two rotating spotlight effect again, which looked really nice in my game Kitty’s Adventure.

Weapon attack swinging animation.

In classic Zelda fashion, the player starts with no weapon and is defenseless until the player picks up a weapon.  In this game, I decided to make the player’s weapon a staff.

In the early stages of development, I spent more time (about 5 hours) than I had desired on getting the staff swinging, collision detection, and animation working.  I had to decide if I wanted to animate the staff swing in Blender or the Unity Mecanim interface.  I decided to go with Mecanim, and I found that the benefits to be great, because the Mecanim animation also animates the capsule collider and all of the children objects with it.  Since I had a light source added to the end of the staff, the light source moves with the swinging staff, which is a really awesome looking effect!  The major issue that I had with Mecanim was moving back to the idle state after the swinging animation was completed.  I set a Mecanim boolean value to start the swing, but there was no way to set the boolean back to false after the animation completed.  The swing animation would just keep repeating.  After looking at some Unity Mecanim tips, I learned that a Mecanim trigger (different from a collider trigger) could be used instead of a boolean value, which would set the animation state back to idle after the attack animation completed, which solved my repeating swing animation problem.

ancientadventure001

By default, the staff had a mass value, which would cause enemies to be deflected when it.  It was a nice effect, but it would also push the player back slightly as well.  I made a design decision to set the mass of the staff to zero to eliminate the recoil effect on the player.  I think it may also reduce the possibility enemies getting pushed into the wall.

In Blender, I modeled a simple staff with a gem on top.  There is one upgrade to the staff, which doubles the attack power.  The enemies that normally take two hits to defeat are killed with one strike.  The upgraded staff is a simple texture swap and a change in the color of the light source.  Originally, I had the standard power staff using a green colored gem and green light, and the upgraded staff as a blue gem with blue light.  However, I thought the blue color was too close to green and it didn’t show up very well, so I changed the upgraded staff color to red.

One check that I had to add was to not populate an item that has already been picked up in that room.  For the ancient artifacts, I had to keep a list of the rooms that had collected artifacts.  If the room number is in the collected artifact list, then an artifact item should not be instantiated in that room.  The same goes for the staff pickups.  If the player’s staff collected boolean is true, then don’t instantiate a staff pickup.  If the staff’s power has been upgraded, then don’t instantiate the staff upgrade.

The purpose killing enemies.

In Ancient Adventure, the player is forced to kill all of the enemies in a room to proceed.  Once the enemies are defeated, the doors are lowered which allows the player to proceed.  The number of enemies remaining is determined by taking the child count of the EnemyGroup Unity GameObject.  When the room is setup, enemies are always assigned to the EnemyGroup GameObject by using the SetParent method on the tranform property of the enemy GameObject.  If it is equal to zero, then the method which lowers the doors is called.  One problem that I came across is that this led to the door lowering method being called on every frame after the enemies are defeated, which caused problems with the door sound effect being started on every frame.  To resolve this, I had to create a boolean value which tracked if the door lowering method had been called, so it is only called once when the enemies are defeated.  The door sound effect was created by me flipping the pages of a book over my Blue Yeti microphone, and then lowering the pitch in Audacity.  I was impressed with how much it sounded like a huge slab of rock being lowered into the ground.

When the door is lowered, the Exit GameObjects are accessible.  These are simple GameObjects with cube trigger colliders.  When the player triggers it, then all of the child GameObjects under the Room GameObject are destroyed, and then the GameObjects for the next room are instantiated and parented to the Room GameObject.  The player is moved to the opposite side of the room, to give the illusion of transferring to the adjacent side of the next room.

One problem the Exits originally presented was that the enemies could go through them (because it is a trigger instead of a standard collider).  Since I wanted to keep all of the enemies inside of the room, I added the doors, which had a regular cube collider, which kept the player and enemies inside.  I had to move the exits back one unit outside of the room (determined by the exit row or column), because the player could still trigger the exit when touching door.

Another problem with wall colliders in general was enemies getting stuck in walls.  In my code, I had it so that when an enemy collided with a wall, it would make a 180 rotation on the Y world axis, and then start moving the other way.  However, the enemies were still getting stuck.  After some debugging, I realized that after the enemies did the 180 turn, they were still getting a collide event on the next frame.  Therefore, I had to wait until the OnCollisionExit event was called for the enemy on the wall, before I would accept another OnCollisionEnter event.  There is still a small bug that occurs sometimes, when the enemy collides with a wall, and then immediately turns, placing them in a direction where they can not exit the wall.  The enemy turn behavior is defined in a separate Playmaker FSM, which is independent of the wall collision FSM.  Usually, after a few turns the enemy will eventually be put in a direction so that it can exit the wall.  Again, the chance of an enemy turning during a wall collision at the same time is fairly small to being with, but it is noticeable when it happens, which would lead to players thinking that the game is buggy.  Sometimes it seems like gamers put every tiny glitch (whether it be game breaking or not) under a microscope.

Currency system.

While I was developing the game, I had so many ideas that I eventually had to write the down in a text file, and I ranked them from most important to least important.  The currency system was a fairly low priority, but I was able to add a gem display value and have the enemies sometimes drop gems when they are defeated.  I used the Blender gem generator to make the gem meshes, which turned out a lot better than I expected.  The way the light reflects off of the edges looks almost too perfect.  There are two classes of gems which add 1 (green) or 5 (blue) gems to your total.  The gem dropped is based on the strength of the enemy defeated.  Unfortunately, I didn’t have time to implement a shop or things to buy with your gems, so it is purely there as a score value.  The gems dropping when an enemy is defeated, along with the health drops, also give more of a purpose to killing the enemies.

What could be made better?

There is really no elegant way to do a 2.5D Zelda clone.  If you do a completely overhead view, then you are only seeing the top of the player’s head.  If you do an angled view, then there are issues with things popping in that should be outside the player’s field of view.  There have been many articles written about this, with one solution being an overhead view with all of the items rotated at an angle.  I decided to use the angled camera, and I just use a camera fade when the character enters another room.  With the angled camera, to keep the realism, all of the rooms would need to be instantiated in the player’s field of vision, which would not be very efficient.  Also, it would be presenting the player with more information than they need to see.  The player should only be focused on the current room.  One possible solution may be to create very tall walls around the room, to keep them from seeing outside of the current room, which would keep the realism.  Another option would be some sort of fog around the room, which would prevent the other rooms from being visible.

I defined all of the rooms in text files, which are assigned as text assets.  Walls are 1’s, doors are 2’s, enemies are lowercase letters, and item upgrades are uppercase letters.  Using text files makes creating the levels fairly simple in a text editor.  The file contents are parsed using the string Split function and the resulting strings are looped over and read as character arrays.  Ideally, these text files should use a better format such as XML, but that would increase the size of the level files and the bulkiness of using an XML parser would probably not be beneficial for load times.  Alternatively, the level definitions could be turned into bit strings, since each cell can only have a limited number of values.  However, it would make it much less manageable, since it wouldn’t be editable in a text editor.  The bit string level definition approach would be good for an online version of the game, if the level data was variable and had to be passed between client systems.

Since the character model was created in Blender and the staff swing animation was created with Unity Mecanim, the arm and staff don’t always line up properly during the swing animation.  I could try to resolve this by recreating the character model swing in Mecanim as well, so that the arm properly aligns with the staff.  Trying to animate removable components on a character model has been a problem that I’ve had that I’ve never found a good way to solve.

There really aren’t any Easter eggs in the game, but there were some subtle influences from other media.  On the Game Over screen, the maniacal laugh was a reference to the game over screen from Zelda II: The Adventure of Link.  On the game completed screen, I tried doing my best Val Kilmer Iceman impersonation of his Top Gun “You are still dangerous” line.  Some of the room layouts were obviously influenced by the dungeon designs in the original Legend of Zelda for the 8-bit Nintendo Entertainment System.

Overall, I was satisfied with the game that I developed for the Ludum Dare 36 competition.  Since I have a solid core engine and gameplay, I plan to develop this game further and release the game on various platforms.

Ludum Dare entry

Play at Itch.io

Timelapse: CaveMen (the story of my failed compo)

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016 5:02 pm

Even when I didn’t completed my game by a long shot, I still had fun and did a bit of cool stuff.
So here is a (probably super fast) timelapse video of me working on stuff.

Super Egyptian UFO Cat Pyramid Overlord 2000 BC – Timelapse Video!

Posted by (twitter: @rjhelms)
Monday, August 29th, 2016 5:17 pm

Well, that’s another Ludum Dare weekend down. For those of you who did the compo – congratulations! And to our friends in the jam, godspeed in these last few hours. I’ve spent some time today playing a handful of games, and as always I’m amazed at the creativity and dedication of this community.

Myself, I had a great time, and made a game that I’m really proud of. This was my 6th Ludum Dare, and the 2nd time that I’ve finished in time for a compo entry. As usual, I’ve put together a timelapse of the weekend:

Check out Super Egyptian UFO Cat Pyramid Overlord 2000 BC here!

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