Posts Tagged ‘screenshot’

C_NFINEMENT R__M, our little game thing!

Posted by (twitter: @tselmek)
Tuesday, April 25th, 2017 1:45 pm

Despite our team not being that inspired by the theme, we managed to make a little thing.

We hope you enjoy it ūüėÄ

>> Play it here <<

title screen

Small World Fighters Finished and Submitted

Posted by
Monday, April 24th, 2017 8:19 pm

Finished this year with about an hour to spare, which ended up being five minutes after getting the files ready and typing up the game page ūüėÄ

Screen 1

You can check out my game Small World Fighters over on ldjam.com or over on its itch.io page.

screen5

Had tons of fun making this years entry, but now I think it is time for sleep.

Day Two Progress

Posted by
Sunday, April 23rd, 2017 4:18 pm

Day two round up. I finally have most of the gameplay mechanics implemented, along with two game modes and some very simple ai bots. There are a couple extra features I’d like to add but I’m not sure if I’ll have time. Though before that I¬†need to work on the main menu and some sound effects.

ntProgressDayTwo

6 hour progress

Posted by
Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 10:23 am

Just past the 6 hour mark. I feel that I’ve made some good progress, with the game starting to take some shape of an actual game(maybe?).¬†Progress6h

Progress Update

Posted by
Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 7:25 am

Taking a quick break for food, I’ve made some progress with player movement and basic level layout(with placeholder graphics), next I just need to implement some game mechanics.

Progress1

Free the Frog Post Mortem

Posted by (twitter: @GaTechGrad)
Monday, January 30th, 2017 7:55 pm

My post mortem for Ludum Dare is a little late.¬† I got really sick in mid-December (right after LD was over) and was in bed for three weeks.¬† I’m happy that I was able to finally finish this post mortem tonight.

This article was originally posted on my website at http://levidsmith.com/free-the-frog/.

Free the Frog Post Mortem

Ludum Dare 37 was the twelfth time that I competed in the 48 hour game development competition. I wanted to create something with gameplay similar to the classic arcade game Frogger.

Free the Frog in Unity editor

The trick with this game was getting the movement controls right. I wanted to make it so that you could press the gamepad in a direction, and the frog would immediately move to the next “square”. Therefore, the movements were discrete, so I could not use my typical methods for doing continuous movement. The area where the player can move can be thought of as a big chess board. When a direction is pressed, the frog’s location (a row and column stored as integers) is updated. Then, the frog is pulled to that new location. I had to add a boolean variable to track if the frog is moving, so that no new input is accepted until he reaches his destination. This type of movement is great for a game like this, because the player can clearly see if they will avoid an obstacle, which eliminates any case for bad collision detection.

I wanted to have a lot of mechanics in this game, which have been lacking in my previous game jam games. I wanted each level to introduce something new. I got this idea from watching Super Mario Bros 3 videos a few days earlier, where each level had some new mechanic or concept added.

  • The first level just introduces the player to the game, so the player just has to maneuver around the board to reach the exit.
  • The second level introduces the guns, which is the first time that the player can actually lose a life. The guns only shoot one bullet at a time and can be easily dodged.
  • The next level reuses the gun that I created, but this time it shoots three bullets in a row. It’s a nice way to create a new obstacle with minimal development effort. Using Playmaker makes altering the standard gun relatively simple.
  • The next obstacle introduced is the spikes. I think the first spikes may be a little unfair, because they start hidden and pop up right as the player is moving through the game level. If the player looks closely, they can see the tip of the spike when it is down, but maybe there should be some other visual cue. I used a simple Blender cylinder and moved the vertices at one end together to create a cone. I used Playmaker to move the spike up and down, waiting for a few seconds after each position transition. The frog is killed when it collides with the collision box around the spike.

    freethefrog_postmortem003

    Moving spikes surrounding a warp area

  • There is one beneficial power-up in the game. I think one of the flaws of the game is that there are too many negative obstacles at the beginning, and not enough things to benefit the player. The speed booster power-up decreases the amount of time that it takes to move to the next square. I put a long row of spikes, which makes it necessary to use the speed booster to pass. I used trail and error to determine how many spikes would be required in order to have to use the speed booster. Unfortunately, only one level uses the speed booster power-up, so I would have also liked to use the speed booster in another level.
  • Another object that the player can interact with is the warp object. I made it so that there are two varieties of warp points, one red and one blue. The red warps to the other red point, and the blue warps to the other blue point. On the first level with warps, I made it so that red warp is easily accessible and the blue warp is surrounded by spikes. If the player takes the blue warp, then the exit is easily reachable. If the player takes the red warp, then the exit is blocked by spikes. It seems to be good game design to reward the player later if they choose the more difficult path first.
  • The remaining levels don’t introduce any new obstacles or powerups, but I tried to make them unique by using different obstacles together to make a unique challenge to reach the exit. The seventh stage is probably the most difficult, where the player must move at the exact time to avoid the combination of gun bullets and spikes, which move at different rates. However, I had to ensure that there was a small period when the path was passable, to ensure that the level could be completed.

For the graphics, I used Blender as usual to model, texture map, and animate the frog. However, when the frog dies, I used the cell fracture plugin for Blender to make an animation of the frog falling apart into pieces. This effect is probably more suitable for non-organic objects, but I liked the effect so much that I had to include it in this game.

FreeTheFrogDeathAnim

As for the music, I used GarageBand on my Mac Book Pro again for composing the music. I didn’t do anything really out of the ordinary. I used the drummer track to lay down a unique beat. I made a couple of melodies, which I alternated and swapped instruments. Sometimes I would slightly modify and mix the melodies to keep the music interesting. The music for the game level is one minute and twenty eight seconds, which I think is the right length for it not to be too repetitive. I did a few quick searches for classic game level songs, and most songs seem to be around 90 seconds to two minutes before they loop.

As I did for my last Ludum Dare game, I used text files for storing the level layouts. Each character in the file represents either an object, obstacle, powerup, warp area, exit, or starting position. The text files are assigned to TextAsset objects in Unity, and then parsed in my game code using the Split and ToCharArray methods. The text files are stored in the Resources folder in the Unity project, which makes them accessible to the C# script. One issue was that I had to also encode the direction the guns were facing, because they could face either left or right. Having a gun facing right on the right side of the room would be pointless. Therefore, I used a capital letter if the gun is facing right and a lowercase letter if the gun is facing left. Ideally, the game would have a level editor, which would store the level data more efficiently. However, levels can be created and modified much more quickly by using a text editor, which is a big plus for a two day game jam.

Level parsing code and example level

Level parsing code and example level

There were some things that could have went more smoothly while developing the game. I forgot that when you call Destroy on an object, it doesn’t actually get destroyed until the next frame. So trying to do a while loop¬†to delete all children objects while the number of children is greater than zero will result in an infinite loop and crash Unity. You would think by now Unity would give the option to break out of an infinite loop without crashing and losing all of your work since your last save. There was actually a way to attach the process to the debugger in the IDE and set a breakpoint and mess around with the variables to get it unstuck, but that method is very convoluted and probably wastes more time than just restarting Unity and losing whatever progress you’ve made. There is an editor script that automatically saves when you press play button that goes in the Editor folder, so I should remember to always add that script when creating a new project.

Free the Frog

Powerup to increase move speed

I didn’t care much for the Ludum Dare 37 theme “One Room”, so I made the story explain that the frog is stuck in one room. When the frog reaches the quantum accelerator artifact, then he is warped to the same room in a different time and dimension, which is why the room changes every time. I actually based the story on the opener from the 90’s television show Quantum Leap. The idea of the room changing each time probably came from my years of playing Castlevania, where it’s the same castle in every game but configured differently for every game.

I have a few ideas on future additions to the game. The bland gray background should be replaced, and it would be nice to have water filling in the empty areas around the blocks. The individual squares could be replaced with lillypads that the frog can walk across. The game could also benefit from more levels. The models and texture maps for some of the obstacles, such as the guns and spikes, could be improved as well.

Thank you all for such a great Ludum Dare!

Posted by (twitter: @TheFish523)
Monday, January 2nd, 2017 3:10 pm

I gotta say this Ludum has been one of the best so far for me. (Even though it’s only my second one) Alot of people played my game compared to my last game (Seriously like 6 times as many people). I’ve learned alot from this jam. And I appreciate the mountain of feedback you guys have given me. ¬†I’ve had 3 YouTubers play my game and even some streamers.

Two things really stood out.

1: How motivated you can get when there’s 3 hours left in the jam (Seriously I got more content in those 3 hours than I did the first day).

2: The community.

What do I mean by community? Well, what do ya think? The out-pour of feedback, and the downloads and ratings adding up everyday, I even got a guy on twitter who said I inspired him to participate in the next jam! it’s just a fantastic feeling.

Overall, I think 2017 is gonna be a great year for game development. You all ignited a fire of passion inside me, and Intend to use it. Again, thank you all so much, and I hope to see you in the next JAM!

 

Cheers,

FisherG.

 

Cute

 

PS: IF you want to play my game, you can find it here

HourGlass Collector. When simple things are not so “simple”.

Posted by
Saturday, December 24th, 2016 12:39 pm

First of all, I want to thank everyone for the provided feedback. We appreciate that!
It was an awesome jam and we had a lot of fun. So I decided to tell you our story.

A story of HourGlass Collector

HourGlass Collector

Team

  • Skorpyo. Team Lead, Programmer, Project Manager.
  • Fourcy. Game Designer, Level Designer, Artist.
  • Xcentric Noizz. Composer.

Theme

¬† ¬† “One Room”. This theme was unexpected. But it turned to be a very interesting one. It wasn’t a hard one for us. The idea immediately popped up in my head. Our game designer polished it and we started our project.

Game Design

    Fourcy started to make game design. First thing he made was a list of game elements. They were used as game objects. With this list I could make a set of placeholders to test mechanics, controls and other stuff. I started coding while Fourcy was working further on game design.

elements

     Next step Рgame mechanics. Our game has a lot of different game mechanics. Fourcy came up with around 15 of them. Not all of them made it to the end. Some were changed, rebalanced or trashed. I will not show you the full list cause this will ruin your game experience =) At this point Fourcy started to work on art.

Art

    All sprites were made by Fourcy. He used Sai as graphics editor.

char animation standingarch door spawnerspikesbutton map

 Level Design

¬† ¬† Fourcy spent a lot of time polishing this “level”. It had to contain lots of “game layers”. This was the result of “brainstorming”.

leveldis

    There are 3 spawn points on the map. A button works as a trigger and spawns hourglasses. Active spawn changes in a clockwise direction. (This is a hint for one of the levels)

Coding

    This game was made in Unity3D (C#). After recieving list of game elements I started to work. I made a list of placeholders and started to implement base logic. Here we began to move and jump. What a platformer without jumping?

¬† ¬† ¬†Spikes added (yellow box). First real danger. By¬†“danger” I mean DANGER. See these corpses?

¬† ¬† Working with placeholders saved a lot of time. I’d made almost every game mechanic before we had sprites ready. But with sprites it looks better.

Music

    Our game is almost ready. We need one more thing Рa good soundtrack. This is where our composer starts to shine. Provided with gameplay and pictures he made an OST that changed the game. It was no longer a boring platformer but a funny game that attracts you from the start and keeps you till the end. If you like the OST and want to listen more, search for Xcentric Noizz.

Testing

¬† ¬† We asked everyone we could to try our game. We knew it was hard so we made the game¬†a lot easier. We can’t make it even easier because it will become boring. We did our best to balance the difficulty curve. But there’s always room to improve. And thank you for the feedback and gameplay videos. This helped us to find the problem.

Thanks for reading!

Click here to play HourGlass Collector

Post LD

Posted by
Friday, December 23rd, 2016 5:55 pm

Finally finished the post ld version, of my entry.¬†Now it’s how it should be :)
And here it is goo.gl/WHdKo7 !

screenshot

screenshot

Postmortem Time!

Posted by
Friday, December 23rd, 2016 1:40 pm

title

Postmortem

DONE

Here is the (likely incredibly dull) story of how I made my Compo entry, One Room Hotel. As a bonus I also did some stuff with the CSS of the post, hopefully that works out when it gets to the front page.

theme announcement

When I heard the theme, I was not happy. I felt like I had no ideas for the theme, and that it was far too limiting.

Then I realized I had voted for it¬†ūüėõ

My brainstorming process is simple: come up with ideas for the given theme, then come up with themes related to the given theme, then brainstorm based on those. I find doing this is very helpful, as it forces you to look at the theme in different ways, rather than mentally getting stuck on a few ideas. I ended up writing down the idea I was going to use in the section headed “One Room at A Time.”

The idea, as written, was very unclear:

Action Hotel Management Rhythm Game

I  worked up the design of my game based on this, and it went through a few iterations.

  • In the first iteration, you controlled a room in a two story hotel, and needed to pick people up as they walked through to bring them to another side. The idea didn’t really make much sense, so I scrapped it.
  • The second idea was not related to the theme very much at all (it was closer to the “One Room at A Time” the original concept was written under.) You needed to place and remove rooms to optimize your hotel. I realized this did not fit the theme, and would not be very fun, and scrapped it.
  • The third iteration was the one I kept, where you need to carry people around in order to get them where they want to go quickly.

The inspiration for the game actually came from Hot Wheels Drive Through Dilemma, a time management flash game I played a long time ago. I was also thinking about the game SimTower, an inspiration which a couple of people seem to have picked up on.

After I had my full idea, it was time to start work.


starting work

One issue that has been common to every Ludum Dare I’ve competed in is a lack of initial confidence in my idea. I always second-guess myself and this compo was no exception.

I especially felt that the sprites I was drawing would not work. I nearly scrapped the idea right there, but my bad experience a year ago with wasting time on a second idea when working on Disphere led me to stick with my original plan.

One Room Hotel Early Development The basic mechanisms in place.  At this point I was still thinking about changing game ideas.

This uncertainty continued throughout the night, and into the next day.

I finished the day with a post showing people entering the hotel.

One Room Hotel With Guests The game started to have some form, but I was still unhappy with it.

the first day

When I woke up to start work the first full day, I saw that this was the most “hearted” post I had ever made, with 17 hearts. This is what finally convinced me that this was the idea to work on. If people were responding this well to such a basic illustration of the mechanics, I must have been on to something.

Getting the people to look good was a struggle, and took the better part of an hour and a half. For a while I was worried that I would need to pursue a different graphical style, but I ended up managing it.

When I finished the amenities, the game really started to come together. It started to fell like a real game, and I felt it was time to share what the gameplay was really like. I came up with a simple backstory for the game, and made a post. In a couple hours, this post had 27 hearts.

One Room Hotel With Three Amenities The most hearted image I have ever posted.

This post is by far the best received progress update I have ever had, and helped motivate me as I began to add more fleshed-out gameplay.

The next major change to the game was the addition of the day-night cycle. I needed a way to make it clear when a round was going to end and to create a feeling of progression during a stage, and this was the perfect way to do so.

Unfortunately, this somehow managed to be the most time consuming process of the entire project. I struggled with calculating how to blend colors, and with the scripts for doing so in GameMaker¬†Studio. I eventually resorted to trial and error for getting the sky’s brightness right, and used an overlay rather than blending the color.

The ordeal was worth it, though, as it made the world feel more alive and gave the game a much better progression. The progression still wasn’t perfect, however, so I started to brainstorm ways around this.

One Room Hotel Timelapse The day night cycle took far too long to implement, but it was worth it.

After the day night cycle, there were still a few issues with the progression of the game. People came and went at any time of day, and rounds had nothing substantial separating them. I fixed this through two changes:

The first was a three part structure to days.

  • In the morning, people enter the hotel, and the player is calm.
  • In the afternoon, the hotel is full and hectic, making the player stressed.
  • At night, people leave the hotel, releasing the stress from the afternoon.

This change in the intensity of the day over time is critical to the feeling of the game. The stress I wanted would have tired the player if it was constant, or even if it was random. Because it happened at a specific time during the day, it created anticipation and gave the player a chance to prepare. This wasn’t perfect, however, as the RNG could throw incredibly difficult situations at the player. This is an issue with all of my games, and it is the main complaint people have with One Room Hotel in particular.

The next feature I added to improve the flow was hotel construction. The time between rounds felt rushed, and I needed another step in order to ease the transition to the next stage.

I thought about what I could add that would fit with the progression of the game, and I realized that adding a screen where you must construct your tower would accomplish three things:

  • Break up the time in between stages
  • Give a sense of progression as the tower grows higher
  • Add a layer (or maybe the illusion of a layer) of strategy

The building screen accomplished all of these things in my mind, and I personally think the blueprint aesthetic during construction looks really cool.

Construction of the One Room Hotel Construction helped the rhythm of the game, helping to better delineate stages.

After construction was finished, I squashed bugs and implemented small features for a while before going to sleep, with a near feature complete game ready for polishing on the second full day.

the second day

PANIC PANIC PANIC PANIC

At the start of the second day, I had around 20-30 items on my to-do list, which was just a little bit nerve wracking. I legitimately thought I wouldn’t finish, but I pushed through and just started working despite this worry. Worries like that have hurt my performance in previous events, and I was NOT going to let that happen again.

After all of the panicking, I decided that the most important thing to get done was the user interface. I’ve neglected this somewhat in the past and it has hurt the quality of my games. I spent a few hours on the interface, and tried a few different styles before I settled on what I used in game (and in the styling of this post.)

One Room Hotel UI and Reviews I chose a UI matching the color palette of the hotel.

I also worked on the in-game UI, and got that looking good with a color changing satisfaction meter and an icon for your money (score.)

I wish I had taken the time to make a separate icon for satisfaction, but I was forced to focus on others things.

One Room Hotel User Interface The basic in-game interface: the satisfaction meter and score.

Something I added that not many people seem to have noticed is the randomly generated hotel and newspaper names. There are thousands of potential hotel names, each generated from an adjective, a noun, and then a type of establishment (Inn, resort, hotel, ETC.)

  • remote smile resort
  • summer arc retreat
  • summer cliff hotel
  • spring shark resort
  • enchanting gulf retreat
  • winter pond tower
  • regal delight hotel
  • enchanting tornado resort
  • winter mountain resort
  • pleasant delight tower
  • globetrotter mountain resort
  • regal park tower
  • pleasant arc tower

The newspaper names were a little simpler. They also consisted of three parts, but the first was simply a choice between have “The ” or “” at the start of the name. The next part was a noun, and the third was a type of publication.

  • The Remote Week
  • The Silver Herald
  • Hotel Times
  • Fascinating Week
  • Inn Enquirer
  • Terracotta Times
  • Hotel Journal
  • The Pleasant Week
  • Royal Tribune
  • Summer Chronicle
  • Happy Gazette

I love adding details like this to the game, whether or not anyone notices ūüėõ

Since near the beginning I had ideas for the music of the game. I wanted some medium tempo jazz for the menus, and a really fast tune for in-game. I only had time to implement the menu music, unfortunately. I was disappointed at first, but when I changed the music to play in-game I realized it worked pretty well.

The music was originally intended to be for the menus only.

I made the music using Mixcraft 6 (NOT recommended, very buggy) and midi instruments, along with a (musical) keyboard. To come up with the tune I hummed along with the game when I was testing and recorded it. Once I sang something that I liked I just needed to figure out the notes to actually play it.

I would highly recommend this method to anyone who doesn’t typically write music, as it really saves time and does a lot for quality if you don’t know how to write music. It’s a lot easier to improvise melodies when singing then to mess around with a keyboard until something sounds good.

final hours

For me, the final hours of any event are some of the most important. This is where I add a final layer of polish, and elevate the game to the next level of quality. Strangely, what I feel is the most important single change I made on the final day was making the sun better:

One Room Hotel New and Old Sun The old sun is on the left.

The yellow of the sun brings the game’s visual style together, and I think it turned out really well. I don’t know why, but that’s when I really felt like I had made something good. Maybe that’s weird but that’s how I work.

reception

One Room Hotel is the best received game I have ever made. I’m really happy with it, and I’m ecstatic reading people’s reviews.

A few people have called it one of the best games of the event. I never thought I would get to this point in my game development, and I am so happy that people feel this way about my game.

I’m incredibly excited to see how the game places, and I hope to finally break into the top 50 for fun, and maybe even for overall.

post compo plans

I may release a post jam version of the game, fixing some of the issues with it, and it may be coming to Android. I’m not sure at this point, but it is a possibility. I’m more likely to focus on a long-term project I’m going to be working on for FFSJam,¬†a manic shooter.

Thank you so much for reading!

play now

 

Le Rest’ouf !

Posted by
Monday, December 12th, 2016 6:35 pm

menu
WE MADE IT!!
Even if we did it through Skype (8700 km between us) and the fact as we didn’t know each other before this 72 hours… What a challenge!

Le Rest’ouf” is a crazy restaurant simulator where you serve fancy cuisine to impatient customers by throwing plates at them. Click and drag plates to throw them, Headphones are REALLY recommended !

‚Üí You can try the game here
‚Üí And check the Original Sound Track on Youtube !

Last update to HellBlocks!

Posted by
Monday, December 12th, 2016 5:31 pm

The last update of hellblocks was just made public!

Thanks everyone!

125089-shot0-1481482947.png-eq-900-500

125089-shot0-1481571402.png-eq-900-500125089-shot1-1481571402.png-eq-900-500

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I ported WebGL version of my game!

Posted by (twitter: @geekdima)
Monday, December 12th, 2016 1:54 pm

Hey! So finally I found out why my WebGL build crashed, not enough memory! I gave it half a gig, hopefully it’s not too much for people with low-end specs.

WebGL!

WebGL!

You can play it on the game page, or GameJolt.

Now let’s get back to playing games!

New update on HellBlocks

Posted by
Monday, December 12th, 2016 10:56 am

All of your requests have been fixed! This includes the following :
1) Instadeaths are fixed!
2) Full controller support.
3) Added an indication to the blocks that are about to be destroyed.
4) Fixed gem counter.
5) Changed the pitch of the jump sound that made it sound like a glitch
6) Added gem counter in game.
7) Made more precise collision calculated for the player.
8) More gem drops (yay!)
9) Changed (a bit) the box spawning algorithm.

Thanks for playing!

125089-shot2-1481482947.png-eq-900-500125089-shot1-1481482947.png-eq-900-500

Progress Update 2

Posted by (twitter: @clockworkpat)
Monday, December 12th, 2016 2:22 am

Steady progress! Our main todos left are: finish up level design/gameplay, fix all issues playtesters had, figure out music.

Good luck jammers, and congrats to everyone who submitted already! :)

progress2

Not finished

Posted by
Sunday, December 11th, 2016 9:07 pm

wolfpallew1

So, I was spending most of my time trying to rewrite a raycaster wolfenstein engine from scratch, something I have done before in the past but always end up with horrible bugs and long time till I get it right. The alternative root would be to write some OpenGL code and make a simple room but I was afraid of the modelling it will require or maybe I could make it with procedural contect but not sure how it would look. While the raycaster root would mean blocky walls and a single¬†would be too bland, but the idea was different. The concept would be to have all these hundreds of doors (in the screenshot it looks like garage door almost, proceduraly generated cause I don’t have time to write code to load images now) and Only One Room behind the doors would be the correct. Yep, kinda twisted the theme. I was thinking of making some funny enemies or pictures behind the wrong walls and ridiculous sounds (I haven’t done any of them), so it would get annoying the more you open. I wasn’t sure how to go from there gameplay-wise, hoping to finish and plan from there, maybe have a limited time till you open the right door and a monster to chase you around the corridors or the wrong doors triggering bad effects in your movement (like drunk movement or freeze for 5 seconds, etc).

I am not even sure if I’ll have motivation to wake up tomorrow and finish this for the Jam instead. So, I’ll just post a screenshot for now..

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