Ludum Dare 35
The Theme is:
Shapeshift

Judging ends in
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PlayRate80Star

Thanks everyone for coming out! For the next 3 weeks, we’ll be Playing and Rating the games you created.
You NEED ratings to get a score at the end. Play and Rate games to help others find your game.
We’ll be announcing Ludum Dare 36’s August date alongside the results.

Posts Tagged ‘ratings’

What Ludum Dare Rating Categories Matter Most?

Posted by
Wednesday, April 13th, 2016 11:23 am

When we reach the end of a Ludum Dare event and evaluate each others’ games, we grade each game with a series of categories: Overall, Fun, Coolness, Graphics, Audio, Theme, Innovation, Humor, and Mood. When the results are announced, the top 100 games in each category are displayed, and of course it is every competitor’s dream to land in at least one of those top-100 lists.

The Overall category holds pride-of-place. Arguably, the winner of the Overall category is the winner of the event. It’s satisfying to do well in the other categories, but until you’re ranked #1 Overall, there is still room for growth in your Ludum Dare performance.

Which brings me to this question: Have you ever wondered which other categories make the biggest difference in how you rank overall? For example, do people who do well Overall also tend to do especially well in Graphics, or Theme, or Innovation? Coolness is a measure of how much you played other peoples’ games; does a great Coolness ranking help you achieve a good Overall ranking? If you want to succeed Overall, does it pay to focus on Fun, or Graphics, or Audio, or Mood?

If you’re anything like me, you’re just itching to know.

And now you can.

 

For the last several Ludum Dare events I’ve analyzed the relationships between category rankings by looking at the scores of the top 100 Compo entries. In each event I’ve analyzed the correlation between how games did in each of the nine categories. What I’ve found is that there are strong correlations, and they’re not necessarily what you would expect.

Take a look at this.

Correlations per Event

Correlations per Event

What you see here is a chart of how well each category did relative to the Overall category in each of the last eleven LD events. The blue line represents Fun, for example. This shows that more than any other category, Fun correlates strongly with Overall. If you do well in Fun, you tend to do well overall; if you do poorly in Fun, you tend to do poorly overall.

(more…)

LD34 Visualisation and Analysis

Posted by (twitter: @jezzamonn)
Saturday, January 23rd, 2016 7:01 am

TD;LR? Just look at the pretty pictures.

Hi all!

Before I begin, lets just remember Correlation != Causation

So, using the data that “” scraped from this Ludum Dare, I created some plots showing how each of the different categories correlate with the overall category. Here’s the lot of them (It’s a big image, so click to see it full size). Compo games are blue dots, and Jam games are red.

ld34 correlations

There’s a quite few interesting things there, but here’s a few little points.

As we’ve seen from previous analyses (Google told me that’s the plural of analysis) of Ludum Dares, the fun category has the highest correlation with the overall category, and humour correlates the least.

Another interesting thing is that the audio category is split for Jam and Compo games. You’re more likely to get a better overall score with the same audio score if you entered a Compo game, perhaps suggesting people are more forgiving for average audio in Compo games.

The ID plot may seem meaningless, except that IDs are given sequentially, and so it roughly shows what score people got in relation to how long they’ve been around Ludum Dare. It’s slightly skewed in favour of veterans, but not much, showing that newbies have just as good of a chance of making a great game.

 

But what I wanted to focus on is how the number of votes you got relates to the overall rating you get.

ld34 votes vs score

Now, this plot is a little hard to read because there’s so many people clustered up in the left, which hides the significance a little bit. You can see a slight upward trend as you get more votes, but it’s that clear. If you compare it to the plot of Votes Given vs Overall, you can understand it a bit better.

ld34 votes given vs score
Because there are so many people that cast/received between 20 and 50 votes, you would expect to see more extreme results in that area, just because there are more games. This is what we see with the Votes Given vs Overall plot — as the votes get larger there are less scores near the top and the bottom, mostly because there are less games there and it’s unlikely to get a really good or really bad rating. (That being said, there are some relationships here, but they’re not as significant as in the votes received plot)

In the Votes Received vs Overall plot, we have games that got high ratings with a large number of votes. This would be pretty unlikely if they were unrelated, just because less games got that many votes, indicating that there is a correlation.

But please remember CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION!!! It’s totally wrong to say that this means that if you want to do better you should try to get more ratings, because more ratings = higher overall. Instead, we have to say: Ok, there’s a relationship, what theories can we come up with that might explain it.

When you think about it, it would make sense that games that are really good would tend to get more votes, because people share them more.

Even though the general trend is upward, we can also see that there are games that get a lot of votes in a way that’s unrelated to how good the game is, such as people who are hugely popular or do a lot of publicity.

 

Finally, an issue that often comes up is the concerns that games that didn’t get many votes could sneak a high score just by being lucky with the ratings they got. If you look at the plot, there aren’t that many games that didn’t do well that didn’t also get quite a few votes. There are a few, but as there are a lot of games that got a relatively small number of votes, there would also be a lot more if it was entirely up to chance.

This doesn’t mean it’s perfect, just not all that bad.

That’s all for now! Thanks again to Liam for the useful data!

Laundry Day’s Voting Results

Posted by (twitter: @OmiyaGames)
Tuesday, December 30th, 2014 4:33 pm

So Ludum Dare 31 voting period finally comes to a close. How did Laundry Day do? Pretty darn well, actually:

ratingsRevised

First off, I might as well leak this “secret:” yes, the game is a satire of freemium and social games. It was designed like that from the beginning, from the mundane, boring activity of putting clothes into a dryer, to the comically juicy process of collecting coins and trinkets from the lint trap. This isn’t the first time we’ve posted a satire to Ludum Dare — Not a Clone was also a satire — but seeing that this time around, the game was deliberately uninteresting, this developer had very low expectations.

Not so, it turns out. A lot of people, both within and outside of Ludum Dare have found the game to be oddly addicting. Many commented how hilariously boring the game was, and still managed to find something fun about it. And a few people even managed to figure out what the game was satirizing about.

comments

(That last comment is there because the user clearly figured out our nefarious plan to create a sequel. See, dreamlogician? I told you the volcano was an awfully obvious place to have an evil office!)

Anyways, I’ve got to give my thanks to all of you who played and voted for our game. We had a lot of fun this time, and hope to make more games in the future!

P.S. Our favorite comment may have to be this golden gem from Newgrounds:

commentsNewgrounds

Ratings categories

Posted by (twitter: @csanyk)
Tuesday, December 30th, 2014 12:16 pm

For the longest time, we’ve had the following categories:

  1. Overall
  2. Innovation
  3. Fun
  4. Theme
  5. Graphics
  6. Audio
  7. Humor
  8. Mood

For LD31, I noticed that if we wanted to remove our game submission from a rating category, we had the option to disable it.  I didn’t see the point, myself, but I suppose if your game really wasn’t trying for one of the categories, there’s no harm in recusing yourself.

I would like to see another category added for future LD events:  Controls.  I think controls are a critical element to game design, since they are what makes a game interactive, and thus, a game.  Not having its own category is an oversight that should have been corrected a long time ago.

<3 this post if you would like to see a Controls rating category added to voting!

Ludum Dare Results Comparison

Posted by (twitter: @gamepopper)
Tuesday, December 30th, 2014 6:29 am

So the results are in! So awesome to see the final scores and see what games got in overall, and see where everyone else’s results are on the rankings. Since this is my third successful Ludum Dare, I thought I’d try a little comparing to see how much I did better (or worse) at this point. Then for future Ludum Dare entries I can then add in those results and probably build a chart to see my progress.

The Results

Ludum Dare 27 (Ten Seconds) – 10 Second Paper Flight

Ludum Dare 29 (Beneath the Surface) – Under Maintenance

Ludum Dare 31 (Entire Game on One Screen) – Glow Drop

My Comments

So while the ranking don’t appear to have changed, the average score for most categories has improved. The only category to have gone down considerably over the three LDs was Humor, although in fairness since my game wasn’t intended to have humour so I could’ve omitted the category. I’m also one of the people that got 100% coolness which is an awesome surprise, it means I’m (technically) listed on the results page. At the moment I’m balancing University work and turning Glow Drop into an Android and Windows Phone release as Glow Drop DX. So hopefully you might see more from me in the future?

Thanks for Ludum Dare!

Existential Post-mortem

Posted by (twitter: @Zazanxors)
Tuesday, December 30th, 2014 12:20 am

LD31_submission-preview
So this was my third Ludum Dare, and I have to say I had a blast. Making Existential has been a load of fun. I learned a bunch and ate a lot of pizza in the process.

I’m not going to summarize each day in this postmortem however, as I’ve already done that in both of my progress posts for the respective days.

Ratings

ratings

I’m happy with this overall. Originally I expected higher ratings, but in hindsight I understand why I got what I did (except for Audio – I’m getting way too high a score for that) – I had taken a project that was a little bit big for Ludum Dare and this resulted in me having to focus almost entirely on gameplay only. Almost no polish was able to be done, and as a result my ratings suffer. Besides that, I wasn’t able to make the theme have that large of an effect on the player, and so it was difficult to notice.

What went good

  • Unity 4.6 UI system. I love it so much.
  • Eating, getting sleep, etc
  • Gameplay. Seeing as I focused mostly on this, I think I actually did it pretty decently.
  • SharpDevelop. Magicolo suggested it as an alternative to MonoDevelop and it’s a huuuge improvement.

What went bad

  • Graphics. Since I focused on gameplay so much, I didn’t have much time to improve them.
  • Audio. Same reason as above – no time.
  • Project Scope. It wasn’t terrible, and I was able to do it, but as I’ve said it’s because of this I wasn’t able to polish the game.

So what now?

I’m planning on finishing up the game, hopefully by the end of the week. I plan for it to be my first ‘real’ project as a game developer, and am planning to release it for free on itch.io, GameJolt and Kongregate. I also plan to in the process improve the scripts I’ve made for making platformers.

Anyways, that’s all. Have a good day, and see you next Ludum Dare (oh hey that rhymed).

I’m in (+Chronolapse problems and entry ratings)

Posted by (twitter: @Zazanxors)
Thursday, December 4th, 2014 4:31 pm

Woah Ludum Dare great fun videogames stream development tools tools workflow timelapse snowman potato etc etc.

Let’s get to the point.

I’ll probably be joining the compo, and will switch to the jam if I need more time. Tools:

  • C# – Language. Obviously superior.
  • Unity3D – Game Engine. Due to the awesome folks over at Unity giving away ~1,000 free codes for a month of Pro, this just gets even better.
  • MonoDevelop – IDE. Unity’s one weakness. I can’t afford the Visual Studio plugin, so I’m stuck with this.
  • Paint.NET – 2D Graphics. Besides the fact that it’s awesome and free, I have the most experience with this.
  • BFXR & Freesound – SFX.
  • BeepBox – Music.
  • Open Broadcasting Software – Streaming [Twitch]

As for a timelapse, I’ll be using Chronolapse, assuming it works. It keeps telling me it doesn’t have write permission, even though I’ve given full permissions to everything for the target folder, and ran Chronolapse as administrator. If anyone has a solution, please comment!

Hoping to do better than last time. Ratings weren’t good, and I procrastinated posting them, so here:

Someone told me my music was good. I still don't believe they were right.

Someone told me my music was good. I still don’t believe they were right.

Learned a ton about Unity platformers though, which led me to fix the super annoying “I’m stuck on this tile wtf” bug and optimize collisions at the same time. It even got me to start a Github project to make Unity assets intended for creating platformer games, which I’ll be using if I create a platformer this time around.

Anyways,  theme dare post wordpress vote potatosalad hope ludum snowman and good luck!

Villager – #339th overall

Posted by (twitter: @Zazanxors)
Tuesday, May 20th, 2014 3:28 pm

Not much to say here, other than the fact that I’m proud of the outcome. I’m currently working more on the post-compo version of Villager, as I’ve gotten a ton of useful feedback off it’s release. Thanks to everyone who played the game!

Full ratings:

Did best in Mood (#230) and worst in Graphics (#673)

LD Needs Optional Rating Categories

Posted by (twitter: @Jishenaz)
Thursday, January 9th, 2014 11:31 am

I was looking at the ratings for my game.

jisLd28Results

 

Don’t get me wrong; I’m not disappointed with these numbers at all, considering how simple my game is. However, I’m surprised by a few of these numbers, especially Humor.

Given I am 776th place in Humor, that makes my game “more humorous” than over half of the entries in Ludum Dare 28 (assuming over 2000+ entries). But my game has no humor in it at all; it was not an intended focus.

So one of my questions is: how did my game rate so high in Humor when it didn’t have any? My other question is: would it be possible in the future for Ludum Dare to have certain categories, like Humor, be optional? Like for example, I want to be able to disable Humor for any game I make that doesn’t have any humor in it. Same with audio, etc.

2nd LD = Bronze in Audio! Thanks!

Posted by (twitter: @JarcasStudios)
Friday, September 20th, 2013 1:19 pm

ratings

Just wanted to say thanks to everyone who took the time to play and rate my game!

My previous entry (LD26) was a decent game but was rated very poorly in audio because I ran out of time and didn’t get around to adding any at all. I actually managed to score a 1.31 in Audio that time. I guess there were actually some reviewers out there who felt that silence was worth more than a 1. heh.

Anyway, I knew I wanted to make sure that I didn’t have a repeat of my audio performance this time for LD27. I wanted to make something where the audio was central to the experience of the game. So, I got all crazy and ended up deciding to make a music game with some original music that I’d record over the weekend.

I knew I’d do better in Audio this time around… but I still didn’t have a full complement of sounds – no UI sounds or anything – just 30 seconds of original music. I definitely didn’t expect to get 3rd place in Audio across all Jam entries, and I’m not entirely sure that I deserve it, but I appreciate it all the same!

Anyway, this has been a great 2nd Ludum Dare for me. I’m very happy with how everything turned out and am looking forward to the next one!

Hackfield final rating

Posted by (twitter: @KatamoriENG)
Wednesday, September 18th, 2013 2:31 pm

Here we are! LD27 has ended. It was a great first-time event for me, so congratulations everyone, and thanks for rating, commenting either below my game of below my post – and of course, thanks for entertaining me on twitter while working!

However, I’m a bit disappointed with my final result. I know, I know, it’s fairly good for  a first-timer, but I thought Hackfield was better.

#227 Mood – 3.23

Okay, well…I have to admit that this is a kinda great result! Even though I expected at least 3.5, this is nice! I was almost sure that I’m gonna be the best in this category. I did what I could to do it the possible best, so that’s why I expected at least 3.5.

#343 Innovation – 3.27

It’s easy to understand. I mean, Hackfield in gameplay aspects is not more than a simple 2D “find-the exit” game, with some extra features. All those extras come to Mood.

#459 Theme – 3.28

In fact, this is the highest point rating in the list. Obviously, since the theme was involved in the game – but nothing special. I mean, there might be quite a lot of games that changes only the playground after 10 secs.

#466 Humor – 2.40

For what?! Why don’t you select “N/A” in cases where you can’t rate an aspect of a game?! Move on.

#569 Overall – 3.04

Well THIS was almost shocking! Maybe the fact that Hackfield works only on fullscreen and 1280×1024 resolution made this score so low. It’s still kinda low, though. Being better than 1600 games overall is not that hard, as we are thinking about the amount of mediocre/low-quality entried. By this, I want to say that most of unique and well-made game have got a better rating than Hackfield, and it makes me similar to some not-as-well-made games. And it makes me a sad panda…

#626 Graphics – 2.77

Well, yeah. I didn’t work much on it. Also, tiles are confusing. So it’s kinda fair, even though graphics was literally downvoted.

#666 Audio – 2.33

Siniter placement! Also, lowest score. What would you give for five 8bit-esque sound effect that were added in the final 30 minutes?

#879 Fun – 2.52

Okay, and it was the actually heartbraking rate. Last placed aspect of Hackfield is fun?! Does it mean that for most people (out of 51 at least) found it boring, or at least not fun…the nightmare of the developer. But I deserved it partially, since some aspects of the game is truly hard. Especially security level 6 that even I couldn’t complete yet!

Summarize:

I’m a bit disappointed, but making Hackfield was definitely a great experience (even when I was close to heart attack beacuse of the combination of immortal bugs and stress) and I can see why I deserved such ratings. Can’t wait for December, to create another game for LD#28!

See ya,

Katamori

PS.: I think I should really start to work on Hackfield: The NetField Update…

Final ratings

Posted by (twitter: @CuberToy)
Tuesday, September 17th, 2013 10:44 am

So here is my ratings

CuberToy RatingsI’m very pleased with it, I knew what was my weakness so I’m not surprised. Last (and first) time I entered an LD, the 23rd, I was 26th on Graphics, and even if I really think to have done a better job this time, the competition was really stronger. So congratulation everyone ! I’m ready to do the next one and try do be better.

Never played it ? Here it is : http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-27/?action=preview&uid=10985

Only 1.5 Days Left to Rate Games…. Play These Games!

Posted by (twitter: @ericdpitts)
Saturday, May 12th, 2012 8:49 am

The title says it all!  Here are some more of the many amazing games I’ve had the privilege of playing thanks to Ludum Dare.  Go and show them some love, we’ve only got until tomorrow night at 9!

 

Necro Gaia – lazybraingames

A really fun take on tower defense with a great visual style and sound design.  This game only has 7 ratings at the time of writing, it needs some love!  You won’t regret it.

 

Space Cabin – trylle

The first thing that struck me about this game is its great visual style.  It’s such a pretty game.  As for the game play, it is a visual adventure game that relies heavily on classic text-based adventure game mechanics.  I love this combination, it makes for a very fun and fresh feeling game.

 

Shrunkit – MagnesiumNinja

A really fun puzzle-platformer with an interesting mechanic.  The puzzles are well thought out and the shrinking/growing mechanic is fun to play with.  With some more polish, work, and lengthening, this would be a game I’d want to buy.  You should definitely go give it a play.

 

ascii world – dwrensha

ascii world is definitely an interesting game.  I don’t want to spoil the discovery element of this game; I think that’s what makes it so interesting.  Give it a go, it’s pretty short and you can play it in your browser.

 

Curse of Grimwood – digital_sorceress

A neat little action-rpg that feels extremely polished for the given timeframe.  Definitely worth a go.

 

Quantum Entanglementicefallgames

Quantum Entanglement is a really well designed puzzle game.  The puzzles feel well thought out and the mechanics at play are interesting and fun to mess around with.

 

 

That’s all for now!  Please continue to spread the love around the community and rate more games everyone!  And as others have said, it’s always nice to leave a comment saying what you liked/didn’t like about the game and offer some constructive criticism when you rate a game.  It’s how we all can help each other to grow as game developers, and I think it’s what makes the Ludum Dare community so special.

5 Awesome Ludum Dare Entries!

Posted by (twitter: @ericdpitts)
Tuesday, May 8th, 2012 6:08 pm

Now that I’ve reached the 75 ratings milestone, I thought I’d bring to light just a few of the great entries I’ve come across in my journey for the gold!  These will likely be lesser known entries with fewer ratings, so go give them some love!

 

Get The FROG Off My World!! – by CitrusPunchSamurai

Get The FROG Off My World

This game made me smile.  It’s a really simple game, but it’s presented very well.  Also, the catchy tune will get stuck in your head for quite some time after playing it!

 

Bottlecolonies – by tcstyle

Bottlecolonies

A little strategy/puzzle game with a really great, distinct visual style.  Awesome presentation.

 

Tiny Planet – by CherryNukaCola

The music in this game combined with the euphoric explosions as you send stars off  into the galaxy was very relaxing.   Really nice, simple art style to this one as well.

 

Darkness Creeping – by AD-Edge

The intro to this game pulled me in, and the creepy atmosphere and interesting little creature-controlling mechanic kept me playing.  It’s a 3D first person puzzler of sorts.  Very impressive for 48 hours.

 

Interstellar Moai Ranger – by Shifty

This is a super-fun on-rails shooter in the same vein as games such as Space Harrier.  Very nice art style, music, and sound effects.

 

These are just a few of the great games I’ve gotten to play as a result of this amazing community.  Great job everyone!

Getting More Ratings

Posted by (twitter: @BlackBulletIV)
Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012 12:23 am

I’ve made a blog post on my website giving a few short tips on maximising your rating opportunity. For your convenience, I’ve reposted it hear, but you can find the original here: http://nova-fusion.com/2012/05/02/getting-more-ratings-in-ludum-dare/


I thought I’d share a few quick tips on getting more ratings, which I’ve picked up in my experience with Ludum Dare. Please note, I’m not putting this down as fact or anything, but merely expressing my own opinion.

Rating Games

Yeah, this one’s kind of obvious by now I’d say. Your “coolness level” increases by one per game you rate, and the cooler you are, the higher chance you have of getting rated. Games are picked for people to rate both by how high the author’s coolness is, and how low the number of ratings are.

Platforms

Making your game web-based should get you more ratings; users of all operating systems will be able to play it, and web games are far more convenient for the rater. The rater doesn’t have to wait for a download, or far worse, install various things in order to run the game.

If making a web game isn’t a good option, then make the game cross-platform. There’s a considerable percentage of people out there using Mac and Linux based machines who would greatly appreciate it.

Finally, never just hand the rater the source code and tell them to run/compile it. That’s just bad. Also, try to avoid requiring libraries/frameworks to be installed prior to running the game, especially ones that aren’t all that common.

Commenting

While rating games, try to leave constructive comments behind for the author. Not only is this helpful, but it can potentially lead others to your game. This is because people can click on your name in the comment you posted and be taken straight to your game page. It’s a nice side effect to being cool.

Conlusion

And that’s it. Hopefully it was somewhat useful. In summary:

  • Rate other’s games
  • Make your game for the web
  • Leave comments while rating games
  • Be cool :)

Late night Love!

Posted by (twitter: @caranha)
Friday, April 27th, 2012 11:32 am

Weekend! Time to play a lot of games :-) Besides the normal 10, I also played some extra games from people that commented in my game or posts, and there are some very very neat games I want to talk about in this post!

BTW, I have been trying to rate always 5 high coolness games, and 5 low ratings games — but it is coming to a point that most of the games with 0 comments are incomplete games/tech models. Maybe I will drop the “lowest rates” games altogether from my next run…

Anyway, to the games:

Wild West World
— Today I played a bunch of games that interpreted “tiny world” as a circular playing area – this is a dizzy dizzy platform shooter where you are a sheriff that needs to clean town. Beware not to shoot civilians! The game can use a bit more polish, but it is quite a lot of fun.


The good ship Higgs Boson
— heh, if you don’t pay too close attention to the name, this is an awesome puzzle game. You control a default platforming hero, but you also control the gravity that he is into. So during the game you can make any of the four directions to be “down”. There is a lot of untapped potential in this idea.


Curse of Grimwood
— An action adventure game that is really really pretty. The bad path finding of your companions may make you mad from time to time (Damn, guys, try to get one at a time through that gap!), but the game is still quite fun.

Boxed — This game is quite unfinished, but it uses a mechanic that is unique enough to warrant mention — you play inside two boxes, and you can transfer from one box-area to the other. In each box area, the other box exists – and depending on what you do to the box, that box area is modified when you get there. Some amazing puzzles can come out of this.


1 Seed
— In this game you have to terraform the entire star system, by bringing seeds from lush planets to barren ones. Trees grow procedurally, gravitational physics are in place, and the game in general has a large, innovative score.

D.A.H. — Yay! Another “Kill everything and don’t think much about it” kind of game. You are a dinosaur in a planet, tasked to destroy cities and eat people. Each person you eat, you get bigger and bigger, until you are bigger than the planet itself. Very very fun.

Spaceship Planet Merge — another innovative game, your goal is to make your planet collide with other planets in the same star system. The game is still quite simple and easy, but this idea has a lot of promise in it. Also, the music is good and the sprites are cute.

Have a nice weekend everyone, I hope you like these games!

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