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Ludum Dare 31
December 5th-8th, 2014

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Ludum Dare 31:
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Posts Tagged ‘random’

Progress, I guess

Posted by
Sunday, August 24th, 2014 12:40 am

ld30_planet_generation_1    ld30_planet_generation_2

 

A planet randomly generated using Perlin noise. Not sure where to go from here, but it’s some form of progress. At the moment it’s just a height map, so I might add in temperature and biomes or non-earth-like planets.

 

Trial: Behind the Scenes & Post Mortem

Posted by
Sunday, December 29th, 2013 10:22 pm

Ludum Dare Afterisk Trial

Hi Everyone, our take on the theme was an action/arcade game based on a randomly generated grid that was filled with colors and mines. The player could select one color to reveal at a time, thus showing the safe cells. This game came out much harder than we expected since there was little skilled involved. We ended up creating special abilities to balance it out: such as armor, reveal, jump, etc. Also, we tied each ability/color to a positive character traits: courage, perseverance, resilience, and forgiveness. Here’s a run down of the good and the bad:

What went right:

  • Polish. The game had logo, sound, artwork, and there were no bugs.
  • Although difficult, the game was generally fun.
  • The visual design was minimalistic, colorful, and most importantly, something we produced within our skill and time limitations.
  • We experimented with a new creative process and the result was not too shabby. We plan to keep refining our approach.
  • Easily published for Web, Windows, and OSX using Unity. We wanted the game available to as many people as possible.

What went wrong:

  • The game was really challenging because we didn’t have enough gameplay elements to empower the player. We could have identified this sooner and planned accordingly.
  • It was more based on luck than skill. It didn’t feel like you can improve skill and overcome the challenge.
  • We aimed for 5 minute game session, it averaged 30-45 seconds.
  • The introduction story was conceptualized after the core mechanics. It was trying to provide purpose via a “spiritual elements” concept, which was too abstract for such a literal game.
  • There was no tutorial or instructions. We just tossed the player into deep waters without teaching them how to swim.

Even though our creation is essentially a “glorified minesweeper variant’, we are very happy with the game. We are continuing to work on it and making it the best it can be.

Trial Gameplay

Full Article with Behind the Scenes

Play our Ludum Dare submission: Trial!

Wooooah!

Posted by (twitter: @https://twitter.com/OmiyaGames)
Friday, May 3rd, 2013 5:00 pm

My Post-Mortem is a featured blog post on Gamasutra!  Wohoo!

In other news, I’ve added more links to the post to give credit to all the commenters I took quotes from.  And to fix a few typos.

Guns Rule finished!

Posted by
Sunday, May 20th, 2012 5:44 pm

It’s done!! You can now blast away at monsters with an infinite number of randomly generated guns to your heart’s content. (The guns can do some pretty interesting things, if I say so myself).

Can you beat my highscore?

     Guns Rule      

 

 

Rediculosis Post-Mortem

Posted by
Monday, April 23rd, 2012 1:30 am

My first Ludum Dare was neither a success or a failure. I managed to “finish” the game enough to submit it in time, but it lacks so many of the things I drew up at the beginning of day one.

Things I learned:

– Plan how to use your time, just as you plan the game. I ended up cutting like crazy in the last two hours just to submit something that felt somewhat finished.

– Start with a pre-made engine. I spent hours in the beginning setting up my core classes that I could’ve really used at the end.

or

– Use pre-made art. I was more focussed on the code, but I still spent SOME time drawing that could’ve easily been replaced with some (far better) open license stuff.

– Decide before the theme is announced roughly what TYPE of game you want to make and think about it. I had planned out the whole game in the first hour, but I hadn’t really considered how long the code would take for the game from scratch. With more thought beforehand I could’ve planned out the code better and hit the ground running.

Title screen thrown together in the final moments of the compo

Random Art Evolver

Posted by
Friday, September 10th, 2010 6:50 pm

Here is a little program I’ve been playing around with (inspired by the theme Evolution, which didn’t make it again):

Random Art Evolver

This program generates random images based on a code (which is shown at the bottom) and mutates them. When you click on one of the images, you’ll see it in full size at the right and all images will start to evolve from that point on. If none of those get any better, you can restart the same code by clicking on the large image.

Once you have found an image you want to use for something, you could capture the screen and save it somewhere as a bitmap, but the idea is to simply save the code and use a function to generate the image at any time.

The library is for haXe, it generates a BitmapData from a given String. It shouldn’t be too hard to port it to as3 as well.

Enjoy!

Doomed Forest

Posted by
Saturday, April 18th, 2009 8:27 am

I spent the morning not doing anything, most of the afternoon playing UT2004 and Red Alert 3, but then maybe 2.5h ago I figured I should actually try doing anything. So I started out drawing some graphics (mostly vegetation sprites). Then I coded a little to get a random forest sort of thing.

And it’s doomed, you know. You are going to convert this cute little forest into a dark waste. At least, that’s the idea. We’ll see.

sfxr sdl – sound effects for *ALL* =)

Posted by (twitter: @kamjau)
Saturday, December 15th, 2007 5:25 pm

I ported DrPetter’s excellent sfxr (info) to SDL, so it can now be compiled and run natively in Linux!

Download: sfxr-sdl.tar.gz

Just type ‘make’ to compile. You need SDL and GTK 2.

sfxr – sound effects for all!

Posted by
Thursday, December 13th, 2007 6:13 pm

Been tinkering with this over the last couple of days.

EDIT: Official sfxr homepage – http://www.drpetter.se/project_sfxr.html

As the audio geek I am, I find it a bit unfortunate that most LD48 entries are usually silent. I figure it’s probably due to the authors not having a quick ‘n’ easy application at hand for making sound effects and therefore neglecting that aspect of the game in favor of code and, usually, graphics. Even simple sound effects can add a huge amount of immersion and fun to a game, though.

What I present here is, if you will, an MS Paint for sound effects… or something along those lines. It’s meant to make it dead easy for anyone to whip up a few simple sound effects and save them as .WAV files for playback using most game/media libraries like SDL or pygame.

Basic usage involves clicking the left-most buttons to automatically generate random sounds loosely targeted at certain categories. For more advanced users it’s possible to spend some additional time to manually create fairly varied and interesting sound effects.

The interface is based entirely around sliders for controlling sound parameters, along with a few buttons. Even if you don’t want to spend time learning about all the sliders you can still have some fun just hammering away at them and listening to the various sounds that come out.

Hopefully this will mean that there’s no longer any valid excuse for anyone to get N/A in sound!

Download: sfxr.zip (win32, 48 kB) – Latest update: 2007-12-15 (see screenshot)

EDIT: Apparently it sort of works in wine 0.9.50, though with some stability issues. Fortunately though, the good Gerry JJ/mjau managed to port it properly. Here’s a copy of his post:

I ported DrPetter’s excellent sfxr (info) to SDL, so it can now be compiled and run natively in Linux!

Download: sfxr-sdl.tar.gz

Just type ‘make’ to compile. You need SDL and GTK 2.

Source code is obviously included in the portable archive, and anyone is free to use or modify it for anything they please. There’s no need to credit me, although it would be nice if you did. I would also appreciate a little email note if you do create something cool based on my code.

If I get around to making a little update I’ll include source code in the win32 archive as well.

sfxr.gif

The Hat Swarm Attack on Dance Islands

Posted by
Sunday, December 2nd, 2007 6:20 am

The Hat Swarm Attack on Dance Islands is a game made within 14h for the LD8 Swarms compo. However, it was never really entered into the compo, because I felt it wasn’t quite enough, but also couldn’t figure out how to make something more of it. In the end, I abandoned it, and instead used it as a base for Ultra Fleet, which I did enter. This might not have been the best of decisions, but no matter.

You navigated your hat swarm around islands to destroy dancers that tried to defend the islands, while at the same time trying to avoid the deadly dances that was danced at you.

hatattackshot.jpg

The Hat Swarm Attack on Dance Islands prime features was an intro, an island generator (that I later used as a base for rather prettier islands), the famous Hoids algorithm that simulates hats in groups flocking behaviour (later adopted for the fleets in Ultra Fleet), stick figures, and a lot of dancing. Strangely, it was also my very first LD game (together with Ultra Fleet) that didn’t use tiles.

There’s no dedicated distribution for The Hat Swarm Attack on Dance Islands, but you can get it as the bonus in the Ultra Fleet compo version. It’s for Windows, but if you’re a bit clever, you can probably compile it for Linux. It requires OpenGL with 512×512 sized textures support.

Random Dungeon Exploration

Posted by
Thursday, November 29th, 2007 11:29 am

Random Dungeon Exploration is the result of trying to push the Random theme as far as possible. It got random levels, random enemies, random quests (well, a little bit random!), random items, random player names, and random events. I guess it could have been even more random, but time was a limiting factor.

As for the actual gameplay, it’s fairly simple step based dungeon crawling. And a ‘town’ screen where you can shop and select dungeons. It felt pretty solid, but there were a lot of balancing issues that you’d notice once you reached some higher levels.

shot9.png

The game was well received, placing second in the ‘Fun’ and ‘Production’ categories, and also getting the ‘Best In Show’ UBER prize.

You can get the slightly improved post compo version, or the compo version. Both are for Windows and OpenGL.

Sokobomb

Posted by (twitter: @drZool)
Monday, November 26th, 2007 1:23 pm

We cheated! We were two ppl working on SokoBomb me (drZool) and dr Elak. Yes, but we told so up front when we begun. Anyways the compo game is a randomly generated sokoban adventure… minus adventure. And the postcompo game is a puzzle/action adventure, without randomly generated rooms. But with whitty npc’s and melting icecubes :)

Splash

The original entry with random levels are here

The post compo beta/demo of the game with hand made levels can be found here including a video of the gameplay. We did enter Swedish Game Awards with it, but did not place.

Here are screens from compo entry:

sokobomb_snap2.jpg

First random generated level. Note to self: improve difficulty.

sokobomb_snap3.jpg

Dr Zoolak in a mean mood. Random-generated level.

sokobomb_snap4.jpg

A visit to cubicle hell, random style.

Here comes post compo screens:

sokobomb_snap5.jpg

Soko showcasing the latest in weapon sprite fashion.

sokobomb_snap6.jpg

Refraction in action.

sokobomb_snap7.jpg

Who farted?

sokobomb_snap8.jpg

Better put your shades on, those are real hardshadows.

sokobomb_snap9.jpg

No smoke without fire. Creeping features abound!

sokobomb_snap10.jpg

Pathfinding up and running, so are the conveyor belts.


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