Posts Tagged ‘mechanics’

Hart of the Forest – Post-jam Preview

Posted by (twitter: @stellardoordev)
Monday, May 9th, 2016 7:44 pm

LD35 might officially be over within the hour, but our 2nd Door Studio team is excited to carry on the project with our continued development of our game, Hart of the Forest.  From the beginning, we knew that our project was probably a bigger idea than the fast time limit of the Ludum Dare would allow, but the last three weeks have given us the chance to keep going, bringing our original jam submission to something that’s starting to feel much closer to the game we have in mind.  We’d love to share that with you now, to celebrate the end of the review period!

To jump right into the good part, please feel free to try our latest post-jam build at the link below:

Hart of the Forest – Post-Jam Preview Build (WebGL, early alpha test!)

Or, if you want to see the original, here’s our Original Ludum Dare Page

Controls:

  • W, A, S, D (or Arrow Keys): Move
  • Mouse Move: Rotate, move camera
  • 1, 2, 3: Shapeshift forms (Druid, Stag, Bear)
  • Z: Change Camera Angle (Overhead / Third-person)

Before diving in, here are a few screenshots, to help paint the picture:

The idea behind our game (and our implementation in the jam edition) started fairly small, and has grown into something we hope is much larger and more cohesive, in terms of both the gameplay and the story/experience.

For starters, we’ve moved away from the strictly top-down view, offering both an over-the-shoulder third person camera (with more traditional adventure/RPG game controls), and an overhead camera that will make it easier to see your surroundings (when, say, escorting villagers or the like).  This opened up a range of new visual dimensions to explore, including:

  • New terrain, with regions like hills and valleys, a river, a lake, and denser/sparser stretches of forest
  • Light and shadow effects both tree shadows, dynamic leaf shadows, and rolling cloud shadows
  • Water effects including the flowing river, waterfalls, and bridges
  • Pathways that wind through the forest, which will become the roads that both villagers and enemies follow

Put simply, this let the whole forest start to feel more like a real place, and, hopefully, someplace you could get to know by exploring it.  We picture a forest teeming with life, plants, animals, spirits and people, all good and bad alike.  (And therefore tasking you, as its protector, try to do the best you can to protect this place as things begin to play out.)

We’ve also been playing with a number of new features, many of which are implemented already (though not necessarily in this build, as we test), including:

New Abilities and Features

  • Spells, in the Druid form (including our first test spell, which locates lost villagers and sends out a glowing beacon trail, to help you find them)
  • Combat abilities as the Druid (you can test what will be our archery system by holding down left-click — pretend this is fully implemented)
  • Spirit Vision (a Good/Evil Detection system), in the Hart form (letting you detect good villagers from corrupted ones, and helping you spot enemies in the woods)
  • Combat abilities as the Bear (including charges, roars, and swipes)
  • A minimap (sadly omitted for now, as we decide how much this helps or hurts the feeling of immersion in the game)
  • Enemy abilities (including a particularly wicked Area of Effect spell by the new enemy spellcaster, which targets groups of your villagers as they follow you!)
  • Dynamic pathfinding, based on Unity’s NavMesh system, and a custom waypoint system, letting friends and enemies follow roads to their destinations.

We also have a range of new visual updates in the worlds, including an overhaul of our Druid hero (with all this new movement and action, it was time for him to get a bit younger and stronger…!), and some new enemies to face, including the new sort of “anti-Druid,” the “beast-man” berserker enemy.  See those two below:

The game certainly still has a long way to go, but we’ve been so glad to work on this while the reviews were still coming in for the rough prototype of the jam version, and we can’t thank you all enough for the kind words of encouragement!  They have kept us inspired, even through the frustration of posting an incomplete game at the end of the jam!

The concept, as we see it now, will be a kind of single-player open world game set in this one large, high-detailed forest map, where individual “levels” are comprised of objectives including (you guessed it) saving villagers, repelling enemies, and also new things such as saving or defeating good and evil forest spirits, collecting needed components throughout the forest, building up your sanctuary by bringing it new people and materials, and completing quests for the various inhabitants of the forest.

The end result is a hybrid game that we think will be a new and interesting mix of familiar ideas, and one that we’re really looking forward to playing, ourselves.

We would love to hear your feedback, and to offer you the glimpse of the work we’ve put in so far over these last three weeks, in the form of our current nightly build — link below:

Hart of the Forest – Post-Jam Preview Build (WebGL, early alpha test!)

Or, for these last few minutes, see our Original Ludum Dare Page, if you want to leave a last-minute review!  (Thanks!)

Thank you all, hugely, again for the feedback and support, and keep the suggestions coming!  It’s been an honor, everyone — and we hope to see you all in the future!

“Space potato” – The Game!

Posted by
Monday, April 20th, 2015 11:04 am

Introduction:

Hey everyone!

So yesterday I finished my game for the LD #32 Compo! Everything was done in a little less then 42 hours (37 hours)! This was my first ludum dare but definitely not my last! I really enjoyed participating and I’ll definitely keep competing! Anyways, enough of the small talk! Let’s get to the game!

What’s it about?

Join our hero in protecting the faith of the Earth from evil (derpy looking) space squids! Use one of the four randomly dropped potato weapons to protect the Earth and yourself. How long will you last against hordes and hordes of space squid? Let’s find out!

Controls:

A, D – movment
Space – jump
F – use special ability
Esc – exit to tittle screen
Mouse click – navigate the menu

Mechanics in detail:

Well, first off, I think we should start from the 4 different potato types in the game.

Each potato effect lasts for 10 seconds!

A new potato is spawned immediately after ones effect runs out!

 


Bullet potato


Cool Down:
 0.5 seconds (You can fire 20 of them per 1 pick up);

Best use: Fending off single enemies before they come close to the core. Best used during start of the game. Falls off during late game.

Mechanic: Each bullet insta-kills the first enemy it touches. Be careful though because it’s range is fairly short.


Healing potato

 

Cool Down:  2.5 seconds (You can spawn up to 4 heals).

Best use: The healing potato is used to heal the core (in game “The Faith of Humanity”) or the player.

Mechanic: Use the healing potato when needed. It spawns the heals at a fair distance from the player and nothing is stopping you from storing them somewhere further away from the core so they can be used when needed, though you could only heal yourself if stored away( It is recommend to save them on the 2nd or 3rd floor because otherwise they will get pushed back to the core by the enemy). If the heal touches the core, it will heal the core for 150 HP. Otherwise, the player can also use it to heal himself for the same amount of HP.


Chillato (Chilli Potato)

 

Cool Down: 10 seconds (You can only fire it once).

Best use: The Chillato is best used when there is a lot of enemies around, so make sure to make it count since you can only do it once!

Mechanic: The Chillato is a little bit more challenging to use, because you can only use it once. Once you use it, an effect as if you were using fire appears and burns all of the enemies you are facing with quite a bit of range (so it is best to sneak up behind huge hordes of enemies while they are attacking the core and destroy the enemies on both sides of the core). The Chillato only destroys the enemies on the side you are facing, so be careful where you aim it! The heat from the fire will stay for a few more seconds and kill any enemies that enter the radius of it’s fire for a few seconds after it’s activation.

A pic explaining the mechanics behind it: 


AOE Potato (Area of effect)

Cool Down: 4.5 seconds (You can fire it twice).

Best use: The AOE Potato is best used when there are enemies on both sides of the player. It’s range is not so large, so try to use it carefully!

Mechanic: The AOE Potato creates a radius around the player killing everything in the radius after a 2 second delay. The radius isn’t really big, so you have to make sure to get as much as enemies as possible with it, because it is not a fast attack.

A pic explaining the mechanics behind it: 


 

 

Enemy, core and player interaction:

There could be quite a bit of confusion on how the enemies interact with the player and the core, so it’s time I clear that our for everyone!

This pic should explain pretty well on how the enemy damage system works!

A pic explaining the mechanics behind it: 

This means that if in time of need and if you have health to spare, you can push out the enemies away from the core to buy some time to potentially get a heal or an AOE attack.

 

Easy, isn’t it?:

And that’s it! That is pretty much all you need to know to become a real space potato pro! The objective of the game is to protect the Earth or survive as long as possible!

 

Downloads:

You can find the game on the ludum dare page here: http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-32/?action=preview&uid=50640

Or the direct links here:

Windows: https://www.mediafire.com/?xl7k5iiip7ubi7f
Linux: https://www.mediafire.com/?s86teprekrf9su2
OS/X: https://www.mediafire.com/?qqamqdomoqmfx1l

(if you get a weird virus warning, ignore it, I got it as well O_O)

 

Programs used:

Unity3D
Photoshop
MsPaint
http://www.bfxr.net/
FL Studio

Have fun gaming!:

Well, that’s it for me. You know everything there is to know to master this game and understand how it works! Creating it was a blast, and I don’t plan on stopping! Any and all feedback is very highly appreciated because I plan to continue the game after ludum dare is finished.

~AinoraZ

Theme vs Mechanic

Posted by
Saturday, December 6th, 2014 2:21 am

Some discussions really bring out the devils advocate,

 

If the entire game must exist within one screen, mechanically, you cannot introduce new elements, they must all exist within the screen.. enemies, pop ups, title screen, ALL must exist in one screen right?

If its a theme.. well, I can pack alot of game(slaughetered animals) into my (specially designed) suitcase before I get screened as I cross the border..

Or, if we’re playing on a japanese dividing screen… it could be a whole map and I’m just looking at part of the ‘screen’

but I digress… mechanically.. surely all elements must be visible from the start?

First Screenshot

Posted by (twitter: @caranha)
Saturday, April 26th, 2014 7:06 am

After a bunch of problems, I finally managed to get the very basic mechanics of my game down. Here is a screenshot:

First Screenshot

There is still a lot to do before this can become a game, but I’m happy that I’m finally getting into my rhythm. I’m not completely sure if my control scheme is good, so I need to put out a prototype as soon as possible.

Back to coding!

You only get one direction!

Posted by (twitter: @mmacielm)
Friday, December 13th, 2013 11:13 pm

After making the character (currently a box) go left and right, up and down, It’s pretty much estabilished that the core of my game will be choosing which axis you want to use. Do you want to explore left/right? So you can’t explore elsewhere, and so on. If there’s time I’ll probably add the possibility of going up, but it’s a bit tricky since I’m using a top camera. We’ll see.

I still don’t have a visual theme to go with the mechanics. Probably space, so I can use a simple hipster-y blue/purple background and boring gray walls.

Now it’s 4 a.m. ): Getting some sleep before my brain shuts down.

LD#23: End of the First Night

Posted by (twitter: @@UprightPath)
Friday, April 20th, 2012 11:02 pm

Bah! I’m probably biting off more than I can chew with my current plans!

Basically, building on my earlier post about the Ideas, Souls and Worlds I started to implement some stuff. Starting with the worlds of course!

 

So, I’m using the personal library that I posted before the start of the Compo to make a ‘hex map’ world for the souls/ideas to inhabit. Typically a single Idea and the Souls who believe it inhabit a single world. They go about their business, thinking thoughts about their Idea, developing it and making it theirs. However, since they’re in space and there’s never just one idea there are several different worlds. Each world moves through space (I haven’t decided how it’ll work yet!) and they can end up colliding.

When a world collides, the souls that believe the idea go to war. When one side, or the other, is destroyed (By annihilating the source of their idea) the war ends. After a war is over, portions of the world can be destroyed by exerting belief in the idea. This is the mechanic by which the player controls the size of their world, by breaking off chunks of their world and letting them float through space. It’s the algorithm that manages the breaking up of worlds that I’m having the fun with.

Currently, my plan is that I’ll do a contiguous search from certain points, move all contiguous tiles to another map basically the same size, then shift all of the non-empty tiles to the as far left as I can, then as far up as I can (As close to X=0 and Y=0). It’s sort of working, but there’s some small part of it that’s messing up and driving me crazy!

 

So I’m thinking of scraping this for now and just implementing the code that controls Soul movement on the map and the like (When I wake up tomorrow that is!)

 

Night LDers!

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