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Results for LD31
Over 2600 Games submitted

Ludum Dare 32
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Posts Tagged ‘Ludum Dare’

Game bundle sale!

Posted by (twitter: @GameGrapeStudio)
Tuesday, December 30th, 2014 5:36 pm

High Flyer BackgroundGameGrape Studios Robotz Background

Hello and welcome to the  Holiday Sale! In this years sale you can get both High Flyer and Robotz for 80% OFF!

Regular Price: $10.00 USD

Sale Price: $1.99 USD

High Flyer is a game where you fly through many different levels while shooting down torrents and taking down anything that gets in your way!

Robotz is a game where you move around the map while taking down waves of robots and collecting coins and ammo! Survive as long as you can!

So what are you waiting for? Get High Flyer and/or Robotz today!

Both High Flyer and Robotz were Ludum Dare games.

Sale:  http://itch.io/s/1091/holiday-sale

High Flyer: http://gamegrape-studios.itch.io/high-flyer

Robotz: http://gamegrape-studios.itch.io/robotz

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

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GameGrape Studios (C)’2014. All rights reserved.

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Houston: Expedition diary Part 7 – Lab module concepts

Posted by
Monday, December 29th, 2014 11:51 am

The expedition diary of Jam Entry: Houston, We’ve Got A Problem.

Day 24:
New item is available – Lab module concepts:

1-st iteration. Too cute again=)



2-d iteration. The main question – how the Lab should looks like? What is an exterior attributes of such buildings? In real life labs usually is a pretty boring buildings =/
And we don’t want an extra hi-tech with some plasma balls floating over it.

Finally, we came to this concept of an MRI-like construction. The idea – scientists finds some samples, brings them to this module and put into central space.
Then the scanning and analysis starts.


And here are colored ones.

We invite you to our page at Steam Concepts!

Houston: Expedition diary Part 6 – Solar panel concepts

Posted by
Sunday, December 28th, 2014 11:58 am

The expedition diary of Jam Entry: Houston, We’ve Got A Problem.

Day 23:
New item is available – Solar panels concepts:

First iteration of sketch – too much cuteness, lack of tech.

Second iteration. The main idea – all modules arrives to planet inside a shell and during installation engineers unfolds it.

Third iteration. We draw inspiration for this in the “Game of Thrones” intro (those castles are so cool=).

And animation concept:

Visit our page at Steam Concepts!

Houston: Expedition diary Part 5 – Steam!

Posted by
Saturday, December 27th, 2014 11:27 am

The expedition diary of Jam Entry: Houston, We’ve Got A Problem.

Day 22:

We successfully landed at new ground.
Hello, Steam Concepts, we come in peace.

We invite you to the Houston page at Steam Concepts!
(talking about concepts… there are few more at steam page)

Sure, we are nervous a little bit about this move, but we hope it is a right thing and we have to try.

Houston: Expedition diary Part 4 – Gameplay Video

Posted by
Friday, December 26th, 2014 12:00 pm

The expedition diary of Jam Entry: Houston, We’ve Got A Problem.

New decrypted item is available now:
gameplay footage with comments about present and future of the game

(01:43 min)

Incoming transmission:
Wolfnip’s “Let’s play Houston, We’ve Got a Problem!”

(16:25 min)

Ythmevge’s Let’s play

(14:44 min)

TechValleyGameSpace’s Let’s play

(31:02 min! wow)

Thank you guys, it was a pleasure to watch how do you play!=)

Previous part of expedition diary:
Expedition diary part 3

Expedition FB group
Let us Tweet you some space news
YouTube

Houston: Expedition diary Part 3

Posted by
Thursday, December 25th, 2014 11:54 am

Merry Christmas, Ludum Dare!

This is the expedition diary of Houston.

Day 1 additional decryption:
GamesJam work process video materials attached:

Day 2 additional decryption:
The result of 27 hard hours was surprising – our game was awarded by Microsoft

The prize is – certificate for a package of promotion in windows store.
Scientific Note: the level of endorphins rose up sharply.

Jam Entry: Houston, We’ve Got a Problem

Previous parts of expedition diary:
Expedition diary part 2
Expedition diary part 1
Information bulletin for new astronauts

Expedition FB group
Let us Tweet you some space news
YouTube

Bionic Bliss Dev Diary

Posted by (twitter: @ben.rausch)
Wednesday, December 24th, 2014 7:22 am

I’ve long been wanting to get this up and I’m very happy to finally present to you the diary of the making of our team’s entry Bionic Bliss!

Friday 8 Dec

After a frantic day at work, I make my way through to Free Lives HQ; the awesome new dev house that the Broforce creators have just moved into. They’ve graciously invited members of the Make Games SA community to invade the house during Ludum Dare 31. By the time I arrive, the house is already packed with friendly faces from the MGSA’s Cape Town contingent, plus a few devs who’ve gone so far as traversing the 2000 kilometers down from Johannesburg to be there. I find and high-five Richard, the man I’ll land up making a cyber-punk customer-support game with over the next three days.

00 richardBy now, the theme for LD is only going to be announced in 8 hours (4AM on Saturday morning, South Africa time). Richard and I take this as an opportunity to talk about the sort of game we might like to make once the jam starts. The obvious way to do this seems to be with beer, in a jacuzzi, overlooking the distant lights of Cape Town city.

01 jacuzi boyz

In between a bunch of silly ideas involving a hot-tub-hot-air-balloon, we set up a loose collection of attributes we’d our LD entry to have. We want to do something small; a simple idea that we can quickly complete within the first 48 hours and then polish for the last 24. We want to do something with a significant written aspect. If the concept allows, we’d like to fit in some recorded dialogue. We’re hardly out to win anything, but if our game should do well in any of the jam’s categories, we want to focus on humour.

I have a gig to play. I jump out the jacuzzi, dry myself, get dressed, grab my keytar, high-five my partner adieu and hit the road.

Saturday 9 Dec

I only make it back to Free Lives by mid-day on Saturday. By the time I arrive the house is already buzzing with the energy of 20 or so devs excitedly laying the foundations of their jams.

I discover the theme Entire Game on One Screen, which (as one of my favourite options) makes me pretty happy. Now 8 hours behind (so that our 72 hour game will in fact be made in 64), Richard and I head out into the garden with a pad of paper and an adorable pup in tow. In the next 45 minutes or so, the concept of Bionic Bliss will be born.

To try get the ball rolling, we start by listing some game genres that we’d might like to work within (or smash apart). Dating sim? Single button 4 player co-op? Service game? The ideas that come out of this last option get us so excited that we don’t bother putting forward any more suggestions. Our idea is perfectly in line with the simple rules we set up in the hot-tub the night before. What’s more, the concept has us in stitches, perfectly satisfying the absurd sense of humour Richard and I share.

02 laying-it-down 03 bionic bliss is born 04 whats-up-dog

Our take on the theme will be that the player will experience the game from the point of view of a customer-support chat-center employee, looking at their desktop. You’ll receive a series of complaints from people; it’s up to you whether you chose to help them, or mess with them to get through your boring day at work. Each caller will have a profile pic and mood bar that’s affected by your responses. We’ll have some other supporting details worked into the UI. We’ll set the game in a cyberpunk future. You’ll deal with robotic implant recipients. We’ll have multiple endings based on how you treat people. The endings will play out in the “real world”, beyond the space of the screen. There will be blood.

Some more crazy ideas are thrown around. Your boss will check in on you from via the chat window. He’ll be a dick. You can surf the net. It will be entirely made of cats. Ultimately we choose to narrow the scope of the game down only to the customer interactions and head back into the house with a simple, clear idea of the game we’re about to make.

05 yeah

I fire up Photoshop and start working on designing what our player’s desktop will look like. The result is pretty close to the original sketch we laid out in the garden. Characters are done with pixel art. Text is similarly chunky. I finish things off with some scan-lines and distortion for classic cyberpunk, lo-fi, sci-fi goodness.

06 early UI

Richard gets to work in Unity, building a set of tools that I’ll be able to use in putting together the customer interactions. Primarily, we need to set up something that can input lines of dialogue from our customers and from there link up to multiple response options from the player. Past that, each response needs to lead to new customer dialogue as well as have an effect on the mood bar and possibly activate specific endings.

07 unity dialogue

Next Richard jumps onto working in the UI I designed, integrating this with our dialogue-tree tools. I jump onto laying out and writing our first chat; an absurd interaction with a 300 year old man and his malfunctioning junk. I do this in illustrator, complete with scribbly arrows connecting things up and colour-coded numbers indicating effect on mood. Responses options are generally helpful, bored or mean. I work in a path were you can be a dick up to a point, then help the poor guy out. Given his age, there’s also the possibility of leading the old man around in circles, getting him to keep repeating his problem as you toy with him. I read Richard what I wrote. We laugh.

08 dialogue tree

I get going with the rest of the interactions, but I can feel my wits dulling as time ticks by. We call it a day at somewhere around 3 AM. I pack up and head home. Richard lands up coding till the sun rises.

Sunday 10 Dec

I get back to Free Lives at 2PM. Richard has recently jumped out of bed and proudly shows me that, since we parted, he worked in the text of our first dialogue and we now have some sort of playable experience. A good place to be in, given that we’re just short of halfway through the 72 hours we have.

Jason (the third part of Team Lazerbeam) makes it through as well. He gets to work making the game’s music with his iPad, as he hangs out in a deck chair next to the pool.

09 jaysong poolside 2 10 jaysong poolside

I settle back into crafting dialogue. Since I left I’ve had an epiphany; there should be a character who (rather than looking for help) wants you to joke around with them. She’ll be a cyberpunk babe, bored and looking for someone to amuse her. If you do well, she’ll ask you out on a date.

Writing the dialogue for the girl that will become Kiki Kilobyte is a turning point in the game’s development. Creating this dialogue tree, the game goes from a silly extended joke to something much more. Somehow, through Kiki’s responses to options where the player is a helpful , this game becomes a reflection on society turning us into robots. Not physical machines, but machines in mind and spirit. Model employees that do and say as they’re told while faceless corperations strips away our humanity, mind-numbing day by mind-numbing day.

Progress UI

I’m pretty absurdly excited about the game by this point. Music is sounding awesome, we’re making great progress on Richard’s side and Kiki (beyond brining forward some heart-felt thematic weight) has also thrown things in a new direction. There’s now the idea that the “right” response may not be right at all. We also now have two potential endings, one where you get yourself killed and one where you get taken out on a date. We factor in a potential third ending; your terminal is hacked by someone you made fun of. If the player doesn’t qualify for either of these three, we write two more endings in, one where you’re commended for being helpful or one where you loose your job. I’m not sure which of these would be better in this strange dystopian future.

We now have an outline of the 6 characters the player will engage with; the ancient senior citizen, the grammar-nazi, the distressed-mom, the cyber-babe, the juvenile brat and the aggressive “tech-neck”. I bounce between fleshing these character out in writing and working on a logo for our company. Jason has neatly dubbed your employer “Bionic Bitz”.

Bionic Bitz logo

This in turn finally gives us a name for our game. It will be ironically called “Bionic Bliss”.

As Richard and I power on, we see our friends one by one each break away from their own exciting games and head home or too bed. In the end Team Lazerbeam are the last men standing. By the time I call it a day, I’m almost done with the last dialogue tree; the surprising tricky grammer-nazi. The two of us leave from our workstations to quickly draw up a list of what’s left to be finished before the end of the jam, which is now less than 24 hours away.

16 master list

I find myself bursting with joy, taking the long walk down the Free Lives driveway as a watch see the first rays of light breaking through the trees above me.

photo(7)

Monday 11 Dec

I work from home for the first bit of the day. I’ve started working on the pixel art for our customer portraits, something I’ve eagerly looked forward to. Jason’s busy on sound effects, and sends me along to Free Lives armed with a flashdrive with most all of our audio on it.

Richard shows me the first build featuring the system booting up and coming to life. It’s looking awesome. I jump onto finishing the last dialogue tree. From there I script the voiceover we’ll need for the terminals interactions with the player as well as the dialogue for our two off-screen endings. I send these along to Jason, who (with the help of our friends Kyle, Limpho & Anja) records these scripts and starts creating a little soundscape for each.

All writing finally in the bag, I fully settle into the portraits. I’m glad I’ve left these for the end. This is not only because it means I can’t afford to spend too long on them (which I knew was a danger) but also because, having written heaps of dialogue for each of them, I can draw on some pretty well established personalities when figuring out how each of our customers should look.

20-characters

10PM: everyone has a face. I’d have liked to do some shading, but we’re happy with everyone and I need to jump into Unity to start working in these profiles along with connecting up the dialogue trees. I push these over to Richard while he’s furiously racing to incorporate audio and work in all the endings. My last contributions on an art front are an off-screen (for before your terminal is switched on) and a blood splatter to get on said screen if you rub the tech-neck up the wrong way.11 beer and mice

 

1AM: we have (in some form) got our game done. It’s relatively solid, but so very rough around the edges. Endings are half-baked, bits of audio are missing, mood impacts are unclear and we can’t get full screen working. Richard powers through these issues. I spend the last few hours bouncing between preparing our submission and play testing. Because of the multitude of options, this is rather a tall order and I have to play through the game over and over again. I make notes of issues; which of them call for me to head back to Unity and which of them Richard will need to magically fix alongside the mountain of things already on his to do list.

4AM: I send through a submission with a mostly finished (though patchy) Bionic Bliss. After that we realize there’s an hour set aside for submissions, so we spend this time putting a few finishing touches on this bizarre little baby we’ve brought into the world.

5AM: our submission is done and the two of us are feeling on top of The World! Somehow, in 64 hours, Richard and I have made a functional game, that’s relatively polished, funny, weird and amusing. Bionic Bliss exists and it’s something that we’re both really proud of. We head out into the garden, dogs in hand, and take a set of portraits to capture the moment.

17 woooo

I find myself driving home just before 8AM, the morning light falling across my face as all around me people are racing off to yet another day at work. For me, I’ll be crawling into bed, so happy it hurts, looking back on 3 of the best days of my life.


You can play Bionic Bliss here!

The ugly gif !!!

Sunday, December 21st, 2014 8:39 am

Another late stuff : an ugly gif, badly compressed, of infamous DEATHMETALSLUG jam entry !

I know everyone loves ugly gameplay small animations, so here it comes, in case you didn’t tried the game or hadn’t a chance to see what it looked like until now. You see? there is blood, and destruction, and tiny guys killing each others. Sounds fun no ? Come on, I know this gif horror makes you horny, give it a try now :)

I hope the next ugly gameplay animation will be made under a less ugly game version.

THE UGLY GIF

THE UGLY GIF

HA and if you is ever convinced by this incredible unholy mediatic strike :

1 If you are not under windows, sorry it won’t work :( you  rather watch this gif until you eyes bleed than try to struggle with gamejolt URL version : it is just a java launcher of the executable, sorry for those who had the guts to avoid MS.

2 Even if you’re in love with MS you better download the game rather than have trouble with java. Quickplay works… if java version is exactly the same gamejolt expects (I think 7.51. ; 8 .xx will not work, nor under 7.51). Itch or gamejolt’s executable works 100%. (just tell me if it sucks)

3 No really leave java aside. I’ll be very long to load even if you’re ok with versions… Why did i put a shitty java version in url ? because i could, and i am someone annoying. If you persist,have a black screen but no java error, it’s loading.Nothing will happen until everything is loaded.This sucks.

4 Thanks to those who already gave good comments, and enjoyed it, this is heart reviving :)

CHEERS!

Ludum Dare 31 Favourites So Far!

Posted by (twitter: @gamepopper)
Sunday, December 21st, 2014 7:31 am

So after rating 100 games for Ludum Dare, I thought I’d talk a bit about a few of my favourites from the compo/jam. They may not be the best out of the competition, but these were the ones that I find have an aspect of good entries that each of these succeed at.

Tightrope Theatre

This is the entry done by brilliant flash game developer Jussi Simpanen, aka AdventureIslands. He always does games for jams big and small and his entries usually bring a quirky design and incredible polish to them, and this one is no exception. In Tightrope Theatre you must travel from A to B, all while riding a unicycle avoiding fire, spikes and the ground below. The entire game is 24 levels long, and feels very complete for a game done in two days, although you kind of wish there was more. Knowing that Jussi tends to add new stuff to his entries every now and then, maybe there will be more to this entry.

Jumping ‘n Jumping

This is an example of how you should achieve a innovative gameplay in 48 hours, you use one mechanic with a unique spin and give it as much potential as you can. In this case, the mechanic of the game is jumping, and the unique spin is that your jumps are limited, but will increase depending on how you play. Eduardo uses the mechanic in a room where you have to jump to survive and you get this gem.

Screen Mover

Most game jams have a theme, and as a developer you are free to interpret that theme to whatever for your game: you can use a literal route (in LD31, that would mean literally running the entire game on one screen), the metaphorical route or the technical route. With Screen Mover, Sh1rogane decided to go beyond literal and technical with the theme to produce something that may look like a simple platform prototype, until you quickly realise you have to move the game window to progress. The only issue with this idea is that keyboard input it locked while the window moves, but the post jam version does fix this.

The Hyperbeam

Sometimes you don’t have to make a game that’s fun to make it a good entry, you can tell a story, show off some great music or in this case, make some really beautiful graphics. The puzzle game elements are clever, but this game is really good at showing off bloom and neon. It just makes it look wonderful, and the music is really soothing as well. As you may tell from my entry, I love neon glow, and this game does a great job at showing it off.

Swotch

If all else fails, just make a game that is fun to play, and make it addictive for an added bonus. This game’s style reminds me a lot of Terry Cavanagh’s Super Hexagon, and since the developer is planning an Android/iOS release, I recommend him get Chipzel to do music for the game.

Don’t forget to play my entry Glow Drop if you haven’t already.

Moar Streaming! Let’s get to my goal!!

Posted by
Saturday, December 20th, 2014 7:28 pm

PlayandrateAlmost there. Almost there. Come watch me on Twitch!

My goal is to a) run out of games on my list or b) get to 100 Coolness — whichever comes first!

If you still want your game played and rated and given some amazing-tastic, in-depth feedback, there is still a chance!

TC_DL_MWThere’s also still a chance to play and rate the original prototype of “A Fine White Line”!

Play exchange: We want to Play&Rate your game

Posted by
Wednesday, December 17th, 2014 11:49 am

So far we played and rated just 241 games, we want more (MOAR)=)
Please, tell us about your game and we will play and rate it =)

And, of course, we are very excited of getting feedback about our game.
We invite you to play Houston game too:
Jam Entry: Houston, We’ve Got a Problem

Top score for now is: 15 365 scientific data (LegacyCrono)
2-d place: 11 630 (Bogden400)
3-d place: 11 395 (edve98)
4-d place: 11 145 (Mike Mezhenin)
5-d place: 10 610 (sapermysz)

What will be your score?

Oh, and if you like our game – we will be happy to see you in our FB group.

guys

Play exchange: We want to Play&Rate your game

Posted by
Wednesday, December 17th, 2014 1:07 am

So far we played and rated just 234 games, we want more (MOAR)=)
Please, tell us about your game and we will play and rate it =)
(joppiesaus, Warboys, Warpgames, TeamQuadratic – I’ll play your games today, when finally get an access to the windows computer)

And, of course, we are very excited of getting feedback about our game.
We invite you to play Houston game too:
Jam Entry: Houston, We’ve Got a Problem

Top score for now is: 15 365 scientific data (LegacyCrono)
2-d place: 11 630 (Bogden400)
3-d place: 11 395 (edve98)
4-d place: 11 145 (Mike Mezhenin)
5-d place: 10 610 (sapermysz)

What will be your score?

Oh, and if you like our game – we will be happy to see you in our FB group.

guys

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