Posts Tagged ‘LD36’

When an entry becomes much more

Friday, December 30th, 2016 9:26 am

Hi everyone!

Last summer I made my first Ludum Dare entry, it was in the #36 and the Compo section indeed. It was a great experience and I was amazed by all the feedback I got. And I didn’t want to waste it.

These months I’ve been dedicating some free time to adapt and improve the game and I’ve just proudly pubished it today for Google Play.

I’ll leave you the link to the game and some related stuff.

Game: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details…
Music: https://senseitorguet.bandcamp.com/track/high-above
Entry: http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-36/…
Twitter: https://twitter.com/DiegoCTorguet

Thanks for the support and happy holidays :)

People-Pets RELEASED!

Posted by (twitter: @MiguelRossoG)
Monday, December 12th, 2016 10:09 pm

peoplepets

peoplepets screenshot

Hey!

I’m writing this to let you all know People-Pets has been published!

We weren’t able to finish the game per se, but we have released what we got done.

Click here to go to the game’s page!

I’m going to sleep now. It’s 4AM in Madrid and I haven’t slept at all trying to get things to work.

See you all tomorrow, and have a nice day!

-Miguel

 

 

Update # 1: Game jam gone right?

Posted by (twitter: @chrysedev)
Saturday, December 10th, 2016 9:24 am

So we’re in (Wat?…)

We woke up late due to doing some work and talking about life from 9 PM to 6AM

since LD starts at 10AM in our timezone.

Officially starting by 6pm which is almost half a day gone.

Here’s how we started:

Chryse_Pizza

With 5 boxes of pizza! What a way to start the jam with some Dinner Jam.

With the hard part of the Jam done (the eating part…)

we’re down to the dirty and gritty bits, we’ve made progress with our game. Sure it’s only a mockup but hey, better than doing nothing while waiting for the other assets to be completed.

Chryse_Mainmenu

More updates on the game later / tomorrow.

Hope you enjoyed the eye candy (-referring to the pizza)

I’m In!

Posted by
Saturday, December 3rd, 2016 1:15 pm

So this is my first Ludum Dare that I’m officially going to be in for, though it’s the second one, since I signed up for an account here in the last Jam.

I don’t know what I’ll put up, but I hope it’s good!

 

Highlights I Played (LD 36)

Posted by (twitter: @BrianAMacIntosh)
Tuesday, September 20th, 2016 3:42 pm

Here are some games that I happened to come across this jam that I think are worth a play!

sOS

A clever and amusing “hacking” simulator.  Reasonably short, and features a number of fun custom puzzles.

sOS Screenshot

Stone Age Clicker

This is a terribly addicting rate-management sim with glorious pixel art.  If you’re anything like me you won’t stop playing it until you win, and maybe not even then (I played for 3 hours).

Stone Age Clicker screenshot

Contraband Crate

This is a clever and very satisfying quick-play highscore game where you have to pack wildly-shaped artifacts into boxes as quickly and efficiently as possible.  The gameplay is smooth and the art’s not bad, either.

Contraband Crate screenshot

The Last Blacksmith

A play-til-you-die game that looks good and is just a solid experience all around.  Moment-to-moment gameplay is just satisfying.

The Last Blacksmith screenshot

 

Of course, I also think you should play our game, I am the Destroyer, if you’re a fan of those humorous old-school point-and-click adventures.  But I’m biased.

I am the Destroyer screenshot

Retro YouTube Simulator: A Retrospective

Posted by
Sunday, September 11th, 2016 12:50 pm

LD36 was our second Ludm Dare Jam attempt in which we created Retro YouTube Simulator. In this post we look into the creation of Retro YouTube Simulator, and the response it has received so far.

Play Retro YouTube Simulator

Continued below the cut. (more…)

The Ancient’s Ones post mortem

Posted by (twitter: @jacqueslelezard)
Sunday, September 11th, 2016 11:33 am

So what happened for my first VR game?

Capture_d'écran_091116_053255_PM

What went right:

  • succeeded to “finish” the game both on PC and Google Cardboard, there was plenty bugs but the game was playable (unlike the two last ones)
  • worked hard on audio, I think the result is ok
  • the overall ambient seems to be immersive

What went wrong:

  • spent to much time on useless assets like 10 different type of rocks
  • some assets and effects weren’t Cardboard compatible, especially light effects
  • wanted to make too much in 48h (I planned too much junctions in my scenario but it was too much time consuming, the result is only a 3 endings scenario)
  • still no time to make textures and shaders (again)

Play the game (including updated version)

VR

VR

 

LD 36 – Tori Tori Panic! – Post Mortem

Monday, September 5th, 2016 2:19 pm

 

Post-mortem

====================

Gameplay Mechanics/Theme

—————

So we started out wanting to make a game about defeating titans and gaining their powers, kind of like Shadow of the Colossus meets Megaman. The player would start out as a human-sized warrior fighting ‘limb’ titans (Left hand – shield, right leg – stomp), and then gaining their limb-powers as they progressed, and eventually becoming a titan themselves.

HOWEVER, once we started thinking about it more, we realized we definitely did not have enough time to make this game. So we decided to make an easier-to-make game.

We decided to do shooting, starting first with ricoheting arrows off of walls to hit targets, with certain targets requiring multiple ricochets to be destroyed. After doing some searching online, I found a physics-based game series called ‘Ricochet Kills’ on addictinggames.com, where you play as a hitman using ricocheting bullets to kill your targets. It was pretty fun, so it gave me hope that our game would be fun in that aspect to.

We turned our game into a hunting game, where you have to kill hapless animals.

(disclaimer: none of these were drawn by our artist)

@liyiming-serif came up with the idea of detection radii that would trigger the animals to run away: outer one for player detection, inner one for arrows that land near the enemies. This effectively changed our game into a stealth game instead of an action-puzzle-platformer, which ended up working really really well.

 

Programming – @zkwen & @liyiming-serif

—————

Bow & Arrow Physics:

At first we had a drag-and-click control scheme like that from Bowman. It’s very intuitive, fast, and makes the player feel like they’re firing a bow. However, @monchang wanted to have a click-and-hold charging control scheme (the one we have now). I personally was against it because I really liked the Bowman control scheme, and this one was kind of sluggish because it required holding time. However, since our game turned into a stealth game, it actually worked kinda well, so that you have to aim your shots carefully, and only shoot down fast moving targets as a last resort.

We had a some trouble with arrow physics though, constantly adjusting gravity, mass, and velocity of the arrows. Our first arrows were really sluggish and didn’t feel very satisfying to shoot. But we increased the max velocity and decreased the mass. Also, our arrows didn’t bounce off of walls very much, only allowing 2-3 bounces max,

but by then we had established that bouncing arrows would not be our main gameplay mechanic.

 

Camera:

CAMERA CAMERA CAMERA. We had much trouble with this.

At first we had the classic moving camera centered on the player, but then we discovered this didn’t fit enough content on screen, so you couldn’t see what/where you were shooting. Then we added a character-screen offset, so that you weren’t always in the center, but that made it really annoying when you were inching towards a position, then had to turn around, as the camera would suddenly swing around.

We finally settled on a hybrid (camera does the swinging when you are aiming), so that the camera switching wasn’t as annoying during platforming, but as most of you pointed out, it was still pretty wonky and really needs to change.

 

Platforming:

The blocks were really slippery and it made it super hard to jump on platforms. @liyiming-serif and @zkwen would like <this to be a challenge factor at one challenge (tbd). To make it easier, we extend the platform or put a block at the end of the platform to keep the player on the platform.>

 

Art – @monchang

—————

Tools used:

  • GraphicsGale
  • Paint.net
  • Sai

 

First thoughts on art was to make something really bright and relaxing. When I considered using pixel art as a medium, I immediately wanted a beautiful seaside cliff as the background. The grass tiles used references from pokemon ruby’s end credit scene as the color palette. The sea was just a gradient from light blue to purple and in an effort to use parallax, I split up each wave as its own layer in order to create the illusion of a moving sea in game. Once I had the background figured out, I then restricted my color palette to the ones I had on screen (with some shades of brown for the trees). With the limited color palette to work with, it became easier to focus on contrast and making foreground elements pop. As a side effect, the entire scene stayed relatively uniformed and professional, which was great.

Animation wise I was focused on making the character and the projectiles fun to play around with. Taking on the teachings of Shigeru Miyamoto, the creator of Mario, I made sure to make every jump, shot, walk, and charge as fun as possible. It had to feel really good to just control the character even without the game play elements. And so I put in as much juice as I can animation wise and give the players satisfying feedback for every action.

During the entire process, I made sure to have the programmers implement each art asset as they were finished. I figured that a rolling basis was better than waiting till the end. This proved to be true because we left a lot of work to be finished at the end.

 

Audio – @fundamental.phantom

—————

Tools used:

  • Ableton Live
  • Audacity

The sounds were all made in a couple sittings, pretty quickly. The arrow sounds are a mix of Foley and synthesis. The bird sounds are us squawking and grunting, but heavily processed using downsampling and re-pitching/warping.

However, I didn’t send the sounds to the programmers right when I finished, so they ended up being put in super last minute, and we ran into some problems, most notably the music not looping (sorry, you guys had to listen to the first few measures forever D:, but for those of you who waited, you got to hear it!!).

I really had trouble deciding an aesthetic for the music. Bossa nova was the one that seemed most ‘natural’, but I felt it was over done (I’ve played too much bossa over the past couple years). I was split between chiptune-esque Rnb and a 12-string acoustic/chip mix inspired by Super Mario Sunshine. I tried both, but didn’t really like either one. Then I tried dabbling in more ambient/moody stuff with pads, kind of reminiscent of the Fez soundtrack by Disasterpiece.  Eventually I settled on some sort of swing-jazz/neo-soul chip thingy made in a few hours on the last day, but I’m still not satisfied with how it went.

I usually over-complicate things, especially the chord progressions. For this one I tried to tone it down, and go for something simpler, but that didn’t completely work. The A section is in 5/4, and B section is in 6/4. The B section was supposed to be the same time signature, but the rhythms I came up with ended up being in 6/4, so instead of changing the rhythms, I changed the time signature.

*******PS Koji Kondo and Disasterpiece are both AMAZING!!! you guys should check them out if you haven’t*******

 

Level Design – @zkwen & @liyiming-serif 

—————

We designed 8 levels for this game. To keep it easy for players to learn how to control the fairy, our game starts as a regular archery game. The first 3 challenges are tutorials. By the end of the third level, the player should have used arrow firing control and left/right moving control.

Then we make the future challenges much fun by adding the key platformer feature — jump. To hit the chicken that are protected by walls, the player needs to jump on platforms to gain a better position where their arrows can reach the chicken. We made Level 6 slippery bricks vs running chicken. The player can choose either carefully jump on the highest brick to gain long time window aiming at the chicken or aim and shoot chicken within an incredibly short time before the chicken notice the player and become panic then fly away. Giving the player alternative approaches to win the game and keeping difficulties balanced is challenging and fun.

After three rounds of jumping and shooting, we want to introduce a new feature to the player to keep them engaged! And this is a good timing to require the player to rely on ricochet to complete challenges 7 & 8 (given that in previous challenges they should have observed this feature when their arrows accidentally hit the grey wall).

It’s a pity that we didn’t design more challenges that blends all player control skills together due to the time limit. We would love to complete our level design some day in the near future.

level_1

Level 1: No hurdle in between the player and the chick

level_2

Level 2: Tall pile of bricks enforce the player to indirectly target at the chick

level_3

Level 3: The player can’t stand still or the chick will detect the player then flee.

level_4

Level 4: The player needs to jump on platforms to get around the wall.

level_5

Level 5: The player need to shoot when standing on the platform.

level_6

Level 6: Slippery bricks vs. Running chicken

level_7

Level 7: Create ricochet arrows.

level 8.2level_8

Level 8: Harder to estimate the ricochet angle because of the moving wall.

 

Overall

—————

In retrospect, we kind of spent a long time doing a lot of less-important stuff like making the ocean move, instead of fixing camera and platforming bugs.

Overall, it was a great first try, I was worried that we wouldn’t finish, let alone produce a fun game. But we learned a lot on the way about workflow, level design, physics, and stuff!

Here’s our LD36 wallpaper:

 

*PPS – Tori Tori Panic! is an homage to Doki Doki Panic, which is the what the American version of Super Marios Bros 2 is a reskin of (that’s why it’s so out of place compared to the other games). Also, ‘tori’ means ‘bird’ in Japanese.

T.C. Robson from The Daily Fandom takes on the battery-saving struggles of Shatter Point Studios’ #LD36 entry, “Wheel Warrior,” in today’s gameplay video!

Check out the game for yourself and leave feedback by clicking here, and check out Shatter Point Studios’ other Ludum Dare games by visiting their profile! Also, visit The Daily Fandom on our website or YouTube channel!

Glutenburg – Abridged Post-Mortem

Posted by (twitter: @echoflutedev)
Sunday, September 4th, 2016 6:52 pm

Hi!

I’m just posting a shorter version of my entry’s post-mortem, since I just typed up a longer version of it on my dev blog, here.

I didn’t really expect to finish my entry for this 36th jam, even with my poor planning, but I suprisingly did, unfortunately with many features cut out.

Because I had to cut out a lot of features, the gameplay was not very good, as pointed out by other people here who played it.

As far as a story for the game went, I didn’t put too much time into it, since the gameplay and graphics will strongly overshadow it. It was kept to a very minimum.

I was most proud of the game’s graphics, since it fared better than the other parts of the game. I also had the most fun creating the sprites and stuff.

As a first LD jam entry, I felt that it wasn’t bad at all, despite the lackluster gameplay. If this is a game that you guys would like to be developed further, post LD, it’d be great to hear your thoughts. If you haven’t played Glutenburg yet, check out my entry here.

Till next jam.

-E

Burning Light – Post Mortem

Posted by (twitter: @SirGFM)
Friday, September 2nd, 2016 5:48 am

It’s time to look back on how the making of ‘Burning Light’ went. I’ve compiled an annotated timelapse with most of the development:

Quick note: even though I took part of the compo, since it started Friday, 10 P.M, I actually divided my time into three logical days.

As usual, it took me all of the “first” day to come up with an idea. Before giving up and going to sleep, I decided to post my progress here. As I properly described my ideas, I had a new one that was of my liking.

As soon as the “second” day started, I quickly decided on the overall look of the game. Once again, I’ve used the DB32 palette, which has been my default palette for some time. Because of that, I feel like this game looks a lot like my previous entries, specially with LD32’s Kitten.

DB32 palette

Although I decided on doing a quick prototype, I actually failed pretty badly at that… Because of a dumb bug (and because I wouldn’t give up on mathematical correctness over simply finishing something) that took me around 6 hours to fix, I wasn’t done with the prototype until the end of the first 24 hours. By that time, I had no other choice but to go with the idea…

burning_light_001

Luckily, whenever I to took a break, I would either play the guitar or draw something. So even though I was running quite late, I also had already done most of the graphics. But I had no actual gameplay… And I didn’t have time to add sounds/music…

burning_light_002_x2

I woke up early on the last day and start to draw the UI and the player. From that, building that initial mock into a game was somewhat easy… until the final few hours.

When I started to create the level, I began to notice lots of corner cases. I tried to avoid them and come up with a neat level design, but I couldn’t do it. Eventually, I simply gave up a created a simple and short level.

30 minutes before the deadline, I had finished something (questionably) playable, so I began to package everything. I must say that my workflow for building is really effective. I quickly built a fully packaged game (with all required libs) for both Linux and Windows.

Overall, even though my game was way simpler (and buggier) than It could had been, I’m quite happy with the results. I may do a quick post-compo version, since I’d like to enhance my library’s collision detection… We’ll see…

Now (well, when I get back from work XD), I’ll go back to playing and commenting on games! o/

Revenge of Tutankhamun, a Ludum Dare #36 post mortem

Posted by
Friday, September 2nd, 2016 4:50 am

Here is a post mortem written by Edu ‘@sodap_’ Alonso, the artist half that worked on our Ludum Dare 36 entry, Revenge of Tutankhamun. He writes about the overall experience teaming up for this Ludum Dare, and the right and wrong things learned on the experience. And if you haven’t tried or game yet, well, do it now and provide feedback if you can!

Enjoy!

 

REVENGE OF TUTANKHAMUN, A LUDUM DARE #36 POST MORTEM

Revenge of Tutankhamun is an arcade-puzzle game inspired by Chu-Chu Rocket. It was created in an event hosted in Zaragoza, Spain for Ludum Dare 36. The theme for this Ludum Dare was ‘Ancient Technology’, which inspired us to make a game about traps in ancient tombs and we ended up making something similar to Sega’s Chu-Chu Rocket, a classic for the Dreamcast and GBA.

 

In this game the player takes the role of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun, who needs to design the layout of the chambers in his pyramid in order to keep his treasure safe from any looters. These explorers will always walk forward and turn in a predetermined way unless given directions by a magic arrow placed by the player. The magic arrows wear out each time an explorer steps onto them so the player needs to keep replacing them until all explorers are dead.

 

The team was formed by a programmer, Rodrigo Díaz (@r2d2rigo on Twitter) and myself, Edu Alonso (@sodap_ on Twitter) as an artist. This was our first game working as a team.

 

Gameboss Jam Zaragoza

Both of us are members of a small online community of Spanish-speaking indie devs called Indiecalipo in Telegram, where we figured out we should make a real-life gathering for LD36 because it would be cool to meet each other, have fun, and make games. Juan Castillo (@Acrimiens on Twitter), from Zaragoza-based indie developer Mechanical Boss went ahead and started organizing the event.

 

The event turned out way better than we had pictured initially, as the jam was hosted in a community center for art and technology called Etopia where all the participants could stay for the whole weekend. We had a blast partying and doing gamedev battles on Friday before the theme was announced and then most of us went to bed to come up with an idea in the morning and start working. It was an amazing experience and it’s safe to assume we all are looking forward to repeat as soon as we can, maybe in another place so Juan can concentrate on the fun and the game making while others take the hosting part off his shoulders.

 

Development process

To be fair, the theme ‘Ancient technology’ wasn’t really unexpected, as it had lots of votes in the preliminary rounds, and we had talked about possible directions to take in the jam if that turned out to be the actual theme, for example something like a Ghost ‘n’ Goblins with a caveman having to start a fire and make a spear. However in the morning we deemed that idea too unoriginal and played out so with the help from CremaGames’ Guillermo Andrades (@xyaw on Twitter), Rodrigo and I came up with a new one, a game about traps in a pyramid inspired by Chu-Chu Rocket.

 

From there, we started working. Rodrigo started implementing the mechanics and used Tiled Map Editor to create the levels, and I started doing some art. I intended to make a concept and then make everything in a pixel art style but people liked the concept so in the end I just made a higher res version of the assets that were present in the concept art. We didn’t have any problems, it was pretty much smooth sailing for the whole process, which was a pleasant surprise for us.

 

On Sunday we realized we had some problems with UI/UX, it was really hard to control the game and we tried to solve that with UI but in the end that didn’t really help. Sunday night I stayed up until late as I searched for some free to use music and sounds. We still had some time left on Monday so on the train back home Rodrigo made a handful of new levels with a bigger challenge, made a build of the game and uploaded it.

 

What went well

  • Both of us have a fair amount of experience at our roles so we didn’t run into unexpected problems or blocks during development.
  • Making a new take on Chu-chu Rocket was a good idea. It is a great game that needs a more modern version with better presentation and new content.
  • We don’t have any serious game-breaking bugs that we know of (please do try and prove us wrong and report any issues you may encounter!).
  • The art turned out pretty decent for game made in under 72 hours.
  • No nervous breakdowns by any of the members of the team.
  • We finished the game without too much stress.

 

What didn’t go that well

  • We gave too little thought to the game and level design. The gameplay is a bit broken, it’s a weird mix of puzzle and twitch action that isn’t fully working.
  • Only Rodrigo worked on level design, I wasn’t of much help in that aspect and I think the lack of feedback on my part hindered the final result.
  • We probably worked too much while thinking too little.
  • I lost a lot of time on a concept art mockup and in the end I had to change the art style because of it.
  • We based the game on Chu-Chu Rocket but we didn’t look at any videos or played the game. We played by ear and made some design mistakes that would have been solved by checking our references.

 

What we learned

  • A good team of experienced and talented people goes a long way for a successful and stress-free game jam.
  • We need to think and talk more about game design when making games.
  • Chu-Chu Rocket is an amazing game that needs a remake.
  • Concept art should be done fast and with the final style of the game in mind.
  • Check out your references, don’t rely on your memories.
  • Real-life events are a blast.

 

The takeaway

After the great experience in Zaragoza, we are looking forward to working on more projects together and also to attend more real-life events. You should always team up with someon who shares a similar mindset and level of expertise as yourself, that will make things go much smoother. However, you need to strike the perfect balance between thinking and doing.

From https://whitepotstudios.com/blog/ludum-dare-36-why-am-i-in-the-past-who-cares-shoot-the-romans/

I did try & paste the full post here, but unfortunately it was too media heavy and my embedded twitch stream clips were not working. If you’d like to read more, you can do so here.

Yes – you read that correctly. We finished our Ludum Dare #36 game and the end result was “Why Am I In The Past? Who Cares! Shoot The Romans.“, affectionately known as #WAIITPWCSTR for short (videos included further below).

download button

Ancient vs. Technology comes to a head in “Why am I in the past? Who cares! Shoot the Romans” (or WAIITPWCSTR for short).

You’re in the past for some reason. How long can you survive against hordes of aggressive ancient Romans?

Pick up your gun and blast your way through history in this endless wave survival first person shooter.

23

Check out the Ludum Dare link and let us know what you think. The premise is, pretty much, as it is in the title!

We had an absolute blast making this, it really confirmed we had made the right decision in setting up Whitepot Studios, and more importantly, gave us a bit of validation that we actually can throw something together in 72 hours and have it be playable and downloadable.

We made the 2D menu graphics/logo/HUD assets made from scratch, and the sounds & 3D assets were free online – most available in Unity Assets Store or FreeSound, although some texturing was done to them.

Something which we hadn’t done before, which was a bit baptism-of-fire-esque was send the link to some Twitch streamers to see them play it live once we had submitted to the Ludum Dare website. It was really nervewracking, and felt like presenting a university project all over again, except this time to anonymous strangers on the internet with little way to immediately interact with them the second something goes wrong.

Anyway, 10/10 would do again. Yes, there were bugs, and yes, people found exploits – which was great! It meant people were playing it long enough to come across these issues and report them back to us.

So, after begging all our friends to try it out, at my time of writing this, we have 50 downloads! 50! Just kidding, we don’t have 50 friends (haha), but we do have 50 downloads according to itch.io, which we discovered is a really nice way to host downloadable game files and get analytics also.

What’s Next?

We are definitely doing a post-compo patch, taking into account the feedback we have received and comments we received on the Ludum Dare entry itself.

One great thing about Ludum Dare is the feedback system, which encourages you to leave feedback on other games so people leave feedback on yours. It doesn’t feel like a chore at all if you genuinely enjoy playing the games, giving constructive feedback, and getting new inspiration.

Version Control

Thursday, September 1st, 2016 7:51 am

Did you know that it is possible to use git without server? Even if you have a small team:

LD36 Git Log

(1:00-5:00 am commits are the best)

At first you need to create a shared folder and execute git init there. This will be your remote repository.

Than each team member creates a separate folder and simply git clone this shared path as it was a github/bitbucket link. And voila — your team is all set. You can create personal branches or work in a single master.

 

And how do other teams organize code/assets version control during LD?

UBUQ: Guitar Hero meets RPG

Posted by
Thursday, September 1st, 2016 7:31 am

Take a look to the game from The Barberians Game Studio:

http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-36/?action=preview&uid=112058

portada shot6 shot5 shot4

BRAVE to the Core!

Thursday, September 1st, 2016 2:51 am

Hello everyone!

We (@Galbix & @Jorjenz13) finally finished a game on time for Ludum Dare! (only after four failed attempts…)

ezgif-155215786

In BRAVE to the Core! you have to guide the infamous explorer Braba across the depths of the Earth in search of long forgotten ancient treasures… and make a fortune out of the them!

You can play it HERE!

(more…)

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