Posts Tagged ‘good’

Good bye Ludumdare

Posted by
Monday, July 20th, 2015 12:08 pm

Its me de bad guy Sk3letor from #ludumdare channel, many might not know me well but today 6:43:17 I got banned by NeiloGD with words:

* You were kicked by NeiloGD (You will never learn, and it’s been brought to my attention that you’ve been told time and time again. Please find a community that will tolerate your crap.)

Seems I didint learn NOT to have opinion about diffrent things, so this is a lesson for rest of you guys:

– Dont ever NEVER disagree about anything or you get picked/bullied by other users.

– You are always WRONG, they are right.

– Your best weapon: Idle.

So this is the good bye, have nice rest of life.

-Sk3letor-

 

ps.

After ban I feeled draw one last time art about “fair” man who guards the #ludumdare:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/73169970/NeiloGDdeButthurt.png

This post might be get removed by butthurted admin but no worry.. de art never cannot been removed.

 

 

What is a villain?

Posted by
Saturday, December 15th, 2012 6:26 am

Had to out and do stuff instead of programing…  But that gave me time to think and plan my game. Due of my rather philosophical nature I started to think about what being a villain actually is. I really wanted to find an odd view to the subject so I could make something least partially unique.

Evil is something that we, people, don’t like to be done to us or others. It’s usually something that causes harm or loss of power and freedom. When a person is described as evil, we usually mean that he does not really care what others think and freely does these evil things, such as steals, kills, destroys and so on.

Villain is, in my opinion, somebody that can be described as evil, harmful to others. They usually do things that we consider bad to reach personal goals, witch are also usually “rather evil” (destroying the world, global domination, money…).

So, typical villain has an evil goal  (personal gain, satisfaction) and evil actions (generally ignoring will and rights of others).

And we can say that typical hero will have good goals (“common good”) and good actions (treats others as equals).

Both of earlier definitions are inaccurate, however. Usually heroes have to do “bad” things, such as killing, to reach their noble goal. And our villains might also be just misunderstood. Robin Hood was clearly a hero (or least shown as a hero), but why today’s pirates stealing for their families to eat aren’t?

Do actions make your goals evil? Do goals make your actions evil? Is a person with noble goal doing evil things to reach that goal a villain? Or is a good doing person with bad intentions evil?

These are the questions in my head right now. I will try to make a game with somehow odd way to view villains. I just hope I can start it soon, ‘cos time is running out…

So, to make sure that my main character is a villain, are evil actions or evil motives enough, or should he/she have both to be a true villain?

 

My thoughts on why the Kongregate move is a good one

Posted by (twitter: @Bloodyaugust)
Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012 9:22 am

Read it here for nice formatting and style.

 

Let me say this at the outset: I am in favor of the Kongregate move. Now let me clarify some points:

  1. Kongregate is not offering monies based on how well you do in the Ludum Dare ratings. Instead, they use the popularity rating system of their own site. This means that those who do not choose to submit to Kongregate are not in any way forced to participate. If you are for whatever reason steadily opposed to the idea of being involved with Kongregate, go nuts. Block all the entries hosted there. Really show ’em who’s boss.
  2. Kongregate is not paying the hosts of the competition for the opportunity to conduct this separate competition. They are choosing to spend their money in a way they feel will be beneficial, to who or for what reason is outside my knowledge and the scope of this writing. They are not “paying off” McFunkypants or Kasperzak to take the jewels of our fine competition. They are simply offering another opportunity.
  3. Kongregate is well within their rights to do what they are doing. They have in no way broken any law, written, assumed, or otherwise. What they do with their money and site is their business. If they want to have an incentive for great coders to host their game on Kongregate, good for them.
  4. This does not go against the spirit of the competition. The idea of this competition is to make games, and have fun while doing so. It is beyond me how someone could feel that money somehow removes the fun-factor. Money is used to motivate fun in *every* competitive sport! If you ask an average athlete why they play their game, they’ll tell you it’s because they love what they do. Same goes for us game developers.
  5. A chance to win a prize will indeed increase the popularity of the competition, but not necessarily the quality or focus of the games. Fun games get played. Crappy games get tossed. If your game is a fantastic one (and web-based), it will probably win both competitions. If it sucks, you’re not going to do well in either.
  6. This is great for publicity of the competition. Duh.
  7. This provides another way for coders to gauge the quality of their game. More feedback in the form of their rating and comments system is just another way to improve our processes.
  8. Making money for an indie dev is a good thingSome people take issue with involving money in the competition. WHY?! If a person who is new to the competition x-posts to Kong, and realizes they can make money off of their talents, the industry and their lives are bettered. Of course, this creates more competition, so there will obviously be resistance to this idea.

So why are we fighting this? Why not embrace the next stage of this wonderful competition? Lets all accept that this is happening, and figure out how to best utilize it for our industry, and the fun it involves.

tl,dr: Make games. Have fun. Good luck this weekend!

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