Ludum Dare 35
Coming April 15th-18th Weekend

Ludum Dare 34 Results

Posts Tagged ‘final’

Runners RELEASE

Posted by (twitter: @Twitter.com/RyanMan56)
Thursday, February 11th, 2016 7:05 pm

After a few months of work I’ve finally released Runners on the Google Play Store, it is my first finished game that I’m actually proud of! It is an endless runner style game with unlockable characters and online leaderboards.

Available now on android: Runners

Extreme Cactus Dodging

Extreme Cactus Dodging

It is my first attempt at including online capability such as leaderboards and I’m really pleased with how it turned out!

If you want to give me any feedback or have a chat about anything game-dev related or otherwise, you can contact me at: [email protected]

Final Results and Post Compo!

Posted by (twitter: @PowerSparkGames)
Monday, January 4th, 2016 9:46 pm

Thanks again to all who played Edo Arena! Now I’ll include my results in this post!

Thumbnail

Edo Arena

Results

Edo Arena’s results

Reflecting on last Ludum Dare, I got better scores in Fun, Overall, and Humor. I’m proud of making a fun game for compo! I hope to break top 100 next time around, so close! Audio is definitely the weakest point, but it was my first attempt at music so I’m not surprised. Thanks to everyone who rated!


Post Compo: The post compo version of Edo Arena is now available, please take a look if you like! I hope it fixes what was wrong with the original.

There's dual weapons now

There’s dual weapons now

I hope you like your results! Thanks for reading and I hope you’ve all had an awesome Ludum Dare 34! ☺

Swarm Hunter Post-Mortem

Posted by
Thursday, December 17th, 2015 5:15 pm

How was the world’s first First-person zebra-beetle air-combat simulator made? Sate your thirst for knowledge with words from the source, after the moving pictures.

 

 BIG GIF

The Wait

This time around I had no prior project ideas or learning goals. Going in cold.

Out here the jam starts way past bed-time, so when the theme(s) were announced I hit the sack right away and let my subconscious deal with the thinking.

The Idea

I scribbled down a plan first thing in the morning.

It contains some doodles of a segmented flower and futuristic looking bees with the following words:

LD34 Ideas, Growing:
Movement – 6dof
Goal – Defend

The shortest design document I’ve ever done and that’s what I went with.

The Jam

With lessons learned from the past jams I enforced a very rigid sleep-work rhythm: 16h work, 8h sleep, 16h work (the first 8 hours had already passed). As such I ended up working a total of 30 hours with the last 2 hours spent on eating, showering and short breaks.

Working itself went swimmingly. The programming tasks weren’t too difficult and I even managed to use a third-party open-source plugin for the bee movement which saved me more than few hours of coding and debugging.

The Panic

It wouldn’t be a jam without at least one little hiccup. This time around it was audio.

With 6 hours to spare I felt more than comfortable with my chances to finish in time. After recording and listening to the buzzing sounds I made it became obvious that while mimicking what a human might think a bee sounds like is easy, the real deal that is not. Looping and trying the sound in the simulation proper revealed another problem, it’s super annoying to listen to for more than 10 seconds when uttered by swarms of bees.

In the end I managed to fix it by applying a few Audacity effects to make it less monotonous and lower in tone. It’s not perfect by any means, but I consider the outcome an Xmas miracle. The other sounds worked right out the gate, which must be part of the same miracle.

The End

Overall I haven’t had this successful a Ludum Dare Jam since LD26.

I’m not going to do an extensive Post-Jam version this time, but I do intend to give it a bit more graphical polish and a tutorial of sorts in due time.

 

Play it here!

And, please, read the description for controls, there’s no in-game help at the moment.

The remainders…

Posted by (twitter: @Rodaja_es)
Tuesday, December 15th, 2015 10:41 am

Well, there’s that. We survived another Ludum Dare and it’s time to play and vote all of the other entries, so let me tell you a little about our game and how the jam went for us:

remainders 34

[THE THEME(S)]

It took us more than half a day to come up with a game to make, the tie in themes didn’t make it easy to narrow down which way to go. We eventually settled for just the theme “Two button controls”, as it made us think of faster games.


 

[GAME IDEA]

Once that was settled we thought of making a game about avoiding stuff coming at you. We remembered our childhood game StarGoose, and decided to somehow pay it tribute.

The main thing we took was the levels being a continuous loop. So you have to take gems, but if you miss them, they’re not gone forever, you just have to survive another loop to get another try.

The limit of two buttons meant you would only avoid things, and not shoot them, so we thought pressing both could be a bit of a desperate move to avoid some things. That’s where the jump comes from.


 

[WHAT WENT WELL]

We’ve been improving our low/flat poly aesthetics and can proudly claim our game is really pretty.

As an early visual decision, the player and all “good” stuff is triangular, to imply speed and intrusion, while the enemies and environment would be squared (settled and heavy). And this type of geometrical simplification seems to go really well with the style and allowed us to create a lot of different props that go well and their part in the game makes visual sense.

We had a collaboration for the sound and music from @parejomusic. He’s a great professional and made some great stuff. We’re specially happy with the music. Instead of it just being one track, it is separated into different layers, which activate according to the game state. It’s pretty cool.

This is also our first game featuring some introductory in-game story text, and I’m really happy about the way it came out.


 

[WHAT WENT WRONG]

As I mentioned, we had a lot of trouble coming up with a game idea at the start of the jam, so a lot of time went into that, and it shows on how the level design was barely tested at all.

The jump mechanic seemed a better idea before the enemies and life system where in, and we missed measuring the heights of some of the baddies, so there’s a lot of things you should be able to jump that you can’t, and the game fails to show you which are which.

We went a little overboard with the lights, blurs and particle effects, so there were performance issues on some computers (we did a lighter build without many of these, so you can at least play the game, even if it doesn’t look that good).

We failed to do some small silly things, like making the little square mines be on the floor instead of clipping through it, but who doesn’t have this type of thing in a jam game?

remainders 34


 

[OVERALL]

Even if it’s not a local multiplayer game, we’re definitely happy with how the game turned out. Sure there are things to fix, but it is the game we wanted to make and really hope you enjoy it. You can play it here.

Xtreme Crop Duster Simulator ’82

Posted by (twitter: @rjhelms)
Monday, December 14th, 2015 2:51 pm

Well, it’s done. I was working right up to the minute of the compo deadline, submitted on time, and then spent a bit of time puttering with a Linux port, fixed one stupid bug that survived, and played a few games – then slept for over 12 hours. But I did it – after 3 times overshooting my timeline, my Ludum Dare 34 game made it in for the compo.

Presenting:

Xtreme Crop Duster Simulator ’82

title

One pleasant surprise I’ll mention now, though I’ll save the rest for a post-mortem in a day or two: since I just used Input.GetAxis, I had controller support the whole time, but didn’t notice until late on Sunday, so none of the in game text makes reference to it. The game is way more fun with a gamepad or joystick, if you have one handy.

And, finally, the obligatory timelapse of the weekend:

Done: NO HOBO

Posted by
Sunday, December 13th, 2015 7:50 pm

Finished my first compo game 😉

Screenshot 2015-12-14 00.04.44

> Play here <

It is done

Posted by (twitter: @darochamarek)
Sunday, December 13th, 2015 4:00 pm

2015-12-13_20-49-46

My first Ludum Dare jam completed.

It has all the core features and plays somewhat decently (I hope :)). Check it out now!

SPACE BRIX extereme

I had a great time this weekend and I look forward to next Ludum Dare!

Finished – Ian Archer is now live! Please Play and Rate

Posted by (twitter: @kidando)
Sunday, December 13th, 2015 2:28 pm

Runner 2015-12-13 21-59-19-542

Thank goodness!

I’m done. It took a while, the concept was simple, but all is well.

I am dying to try out other games.

Please play and rate this game – Link to game

Good luck to the rest of you guys!

I made it!

Posted by
Sunday, December 13th, 2015 9:58 am

I’m proud of myself. I finished game during 48 hours. Themes were really hard to fusion but i think i did it right. I wish all of you complete ld34 too.

scr3

 

Sunny Side Up – FINAL

Posted by (twitter: @jarnik)
Sunday, December 13th, 2015 9:42 am

Here’s what I created tomorrow in under 4 hours:

Sunny Side Up

I’ve always been using Haxe, this time I’ve decided to try Unity, though I tend to avoid closed source. It’s been fast and effective.

Better late than never

Posted by (twitter: @mbabuskov)
Wednesday, November 18th, 2015 8:00 am

My goal for this year’s October Challenge was to port Drone Invaders to iOS and earn $1 on the App Store.

Drone Invaders was built in 2013 October Challenge for Android. The game got a lot of attention and managed to earn about $90 since the release. Although there were 3500+ players, the main problem for monetization was that the game was free to play and I didn’t really build it to be a money milking machine like “popular” mobile games do. I wanted the game to be fun and challenging and payment to be completely optional. The result is $90 in two years, but nevermind.

Drone Invaders from Space

For iOS, I still didn’t want to change the way the game plays, but I decided to ditch the IAP idea completely and remove all the payments from the game. But how would I pass the October Challenge then? I decided to price the game itself. It’s $1.99 in the AppStore and I have already earned the dollar and the player ratings have been great as well:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/drone-invaders/id1047158768

Sales

All this in about a week since the release. The game has already earned half of what the F2P Android version has in two years.

It’s possible that this YouTube review (over 2700 views) made all those people come in: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI4jNWXvJzY

I think my next mobile game will be iOS-first.

 

From Ludum Dare to Steam Greenlight!!

Posted by (twitter: @TriteGames)
Wednesday, October 7th, 2015 3:26 pm

Hello fellow gamedevs,

we started working on our game “Of Carrots And Blood” almost a year ago at LD31. Back then it was a nice little prototype and a couple of you liked the gameplay and art style. So we thought, why not put more time in it and work on a post jam version with more features. We did that and finished a little game, which has been played by a couple of youtubers, including these two cool Brazilians (video here) and PewDiePie (video here) and we got even more positive feedback from people…That made us realize that maybe there is more to this little idea. We just couldn’t stop working on it 😉

So now we are at a point, where the old free version of the game became the “Classic Edition” and our new version for “Of Carrots And Blood” is now on Steam Greenlight!! 😀

After one week we are currently at 44% to the Top 100 and we need your support!

 

SUPPORT US ON STEAM GREENLIGHT!!

 

Of Carrots And Blood is a twin-stick arena shooter combining bullet hell with cute bunnies, mutants and a lot of blood.

You can play alone and compete for the HIGHSCORE.

You can play together in the local CO-OP and beat the short but intense “story mode”.

You can grab a couple of friend and kill each other in 4 player DEATHMATCH (or in the two other 2 player pvp modes)

AND you can play the multiplayer modes ONLINE!!

So if you like some good old arcade action, where you need to be on your toes all the time or die a lot, you should check out our game:

Of Carrots And Blood on Steam Greenlight

VOTE for us, leave a COMMENT and SHARE it with your friends :)

Sly Slime – Revenge On All Players

Posted by
Saturday, August 29th, 2015 11:00 pm

 

The slime is the most common monster in JRPG. Millions of them were killed by players during the whole video game history. So it’s the time for REVENGE!!

After 72 hours of hard work, we made this game – Sly Slime. It’s visually beautiful, fine-tuned, also brutally hard and unforgiven. You are weak just like your kins, so try your best to survive this bullet hell, sneak and send these players to hell! Give them everything you got!

Please visit our game page here, and don’t hesitate to rate and comment!

http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-33/?action=preview&uid=55414

Good Game, Good Luck, Have Fun!

Out West Post-Mortem

Posted by
Friday, August 28th, 2015 2:12 am

Well, it’s that time! This has been my first Ludum Dare, and it has been great so far. Thank you for all the support! Right, now onto the important stuff.

Out West Promo Photo

Play “Out West” here!

 

The Concept:

My goal with this first Ludum Dare was to make something small that could be developed, finished, and played without any major bugs. I had been experimenting with text adventures and pixel art, so I chose Twine as my tool, since it’s very easy to use, can be expanded upon, can incorporate art, and is contained completely in one HTML file that can be hosted anywhere and played by anyone.

Once this choice was made, I decided my secondary goal was to try and create a very tense and atmospheric mood with only text, art, and time, disproving the common notion that text adventures are perceived as boring slogs which appeal to a certain niche audience (myself among them). Granted, I cheated a little by including art, but as a picture is worth a thousand words, I felt it would enhance the gameplay immeasurably.

 

The Bad:

  • The game is very short. I needed to keep myself in check; my games are prone to feature creep (which is one reason I participated in this jam) and tend to balloon into iii development nightmares which can’t realistically be handled by one person. Even so, I nearly didn’t make the deadline. There are three possible choices early on, and then another three later: These immediately necessitate nine different endings, plus different factors which dictate other variables that require separate endings, plus these all tie into the main ending, which must take into account everything that’s happened in the journey. Due to the exponential complexity being created, I had to cut off many ideas I wanted to incorporate and focus on making satisfying endings for what I had. That isn’t a bad thing in and of itself, but it forced the game to become minuscule, which is a bit more of a problem with text adventures, there being a finite amount of content with a definite end, as opposed to Pacman.
  • There was no time to add in any complex game mechanics. I know: Game mechanics, in a text adventure? Surely you jest! In all seriousness though, I wanted to add in even more interactivity through JavaScript enhancements. Unfortunately, there was no time to properly code anything myself or learn someone’s mod. I worked with what I had, and from the feedback it appears that effort’s been appreciated; But I would have liked to do something like roaming AI characters in the town, with random conversations as possibilities.
  • Almost no animation in the art. Again, this was time related. I didn’t want huge cutscenes, just little touches of animation that would enhance the world, like having the landscape bob up and down as if you were galloping on a horse, or animating flames, weapons, movement, villagers, that sort of thing. Repeating gifs, mostly.
  • The game is very linear. This is partially due to writing and the nature of Twine; the story requires a certain progression, and the creation of atmosphere and mood also require a certain amount of control. That being said, there perhaps could be a free-roam period before the start of this particular sequence which allows you to explore the world a little, or some other stuff which could expand the illusion of choice and open world gameplay.
  • The art. Some have commented how they enjoyed the pixel art, and I’m very happy they do – I’m almost a complete novice at it. In general, I’m quite happy with what I was able to achieve with a fire under my butt and limited art skills. I would like to get a bit better at pixel art and go back and polish up some of the imagery to facilitate better immersion in the world.

 

The Good:

  • The art. Again, I’m a pixel art beginner, and I’m frankly amazed that I was able to finish up all of it in time, and that it’s all decent. Nothing looks horribly out of place, and I’m actually a little proud of the final image that’s revealed at the very end. Gives me hope of improvement in the future.
  • The writing. This wasn’t my opinion all the way through; as I was writing the adventure I was horribly aware that, since it’s a text adventure, everything relies on the writing, and if I messed it up or it simply wasn’t good, the whole thing would collapse with almost nothing to salvage. That said, the feedback that I’ve received about the writing has been positive, with several mentions of it being very well written. I breath a sign of relief. Moving on.
  • I finished it. As with many game development beginners, I fall into the trap of being overly ambitious, even with text adventures. I am glad I put down my foot and had a very strict goal in mind. Though I had to work until the deadline because the art took more time that I anticipated, I still managed to incorporate all the stuff I had planned for this tiny little thing.
  • People seem to enjoy it! I’ll be honest, this was a nerve-wracking experience for me (especially ticking the little “Anonymous Feedback” box). I have never done a game jam before, and had no idea what would be said about something I made. I wasn’t expecting anything, but just the fact that someone enjoyed the experience the way I attempted to craft it is a wonderful feeling. Thank you all again for your feedback. It’s appreciated. And thanks to everyone who’s games I’ve played: They’re all wonderful, fascinating and strange! Well done!

 

Conclusion:

I think I’ll work on this some more, give it a bit more of an edge. I’ll have to be careful: I don’t want to bloat the experience or dilute the atmosphere. We’ll see where it goes. Five minutes of story is vastly different from a three act structure. Either way, this has been an eye opening experience. If you play Out West, I hope you enjoy it. Good luck to everyone!

The Empty: My first time at Ludum Dare

Posted by
Tuesday, August 25th, 2015 11:11 am

After struggling with several bugs, constant black outs during development and a flu, I managed to make it to the compo!

I made this game using solely MagicaVoxel, a free voxel editor that is open source and super kickass!

My game (link to Ludum Dare profile) for this theme is a clone of basic cat and the mouse game. Everything was done by me. You can find out about the story by activating certain beacons when collapsing on them.

HighresScreenshot00000 HighresScreenshot00001 HighresScreenshot00002 HighresScreenshot00003

I’ll be adding a HTML 5 version soon enough. Everything was done in Unreal Engine 4. I wanted to make the game to look like a raycast game from the Doom era. Hope you like it!

Controls:
Movement: WASD+mouse
Attack: Left Click.

How to run:

First be sure to have UE4 pre-requisites installed. You can find them in:

<Folder Name>\TheEmpty\Engine\Extras\Redist\en-us

Then go ahead and run the game by running the .exe on the root folder.

Links:

Windows

Source (Project)

Another great Ludum Dare, Submitted!

Posted by (twitter: @PandaDima)
Sunday, August 23rd, 2015 10:04 pm

So my game is called Plothole.
It should’ve been an adventure/mystery game about a detective who investigates some of the recent murders that might be a a job of one serial killer. SPOILER: in the end the detective would uncover that his 2nd (schizophrenic) self is in fact that serial killer.

In reality Plothole is an unfinished game with only core functionality and not much content at all. (Art is really hard and slow for me)

Plothole

Plothole

After thoughts:

Amazing Ludum Dare! Even though I once again haven’t finished a game, I totally loved (almost, that missing boolean not bug costed me 2 hours of work) each second of it! I learned a lot about Unity’s new UI system, discovered new game genre I might like and wanted to do and finish! I had great time overall, nice to get distracted from some unpleasantness that happens around. I hope everybody had amazing time too, here’s to another great Ludum Dare, and for many more!

I always shared my LD brainstorming results after LD, so here goes: http://codebite.xyz/ld33/ideas/ Although I usually did it in Google Drive, I try to move away from Cloud Storage, coz I am paranoid.

Thanks:

  • To Mr. Mike Kasprzak, for Ludum Dare itself and still maintaining it, and even making a new version!
  • To Unity Engine Team, for amazing Game Engine.
  • To… Microsoft, for Visual Studio and C#
  • To All the Open Source developers, for everything! Much love <3
  • To Ludum Dare’ers, for amazing community! 😀
  • To Zhoot, AtomicVikings, yuraSniper, Leo, Skай, Zet and Thok, Jorge and my family, for being there.
  • To Caffeine, for keeping me alive. XOXO

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