Ludum Dare 34
Coming December 11th-14th Weekend

Posts Tagged ‘final’

Better late than never

Posted by (twitter: @mbabuskov)
Wednesday, November 18th, 2015 8:00 am

My goal for this year’s October Challenge was to port Drone Invaders to iOS and earn $1 on the App Store.

Drone Invaders was built in 2013 October Challenge for Android. The game got a lot of attention and managed to earn about $90 since the release. Although there were 3500+ players, the main problem for monetization was that the game was free to play and I didn’t really build it to be a money milking machine like “popular” mobile games do. I wanted the game to be fun and challenging and payment to be completely optional. The result is $90 in two years, but nevermind.

Drone Invaders from Space

For iOS, I still didn’t want to change the way the game plays, but I decided to ditch the IAP idea completely and remove all the payments from the game. But how would I pass the October Challenge then? I decided to price the game itself. It’s $1.99 in the AppStore and I have already earned the dollar and the player ratings have been great as well:


All this in about a week since the release. The game has already earned half of what the F2P Android version has in two years.

It’s possible that this YouTube review (over 2700 views) made all those people come in:

I think my next mobile game will be iOS-first.


From Ludum Dare to Steam Greenlight!!

Posted by (twitter: @TriteGames)
Wednesday, October 7th, 2015 3:26 pm

Hello fellow gamedevs,

we started working on our game “Of Carrots And Blood” almost a year ago at LD31. Back then it was a nice little prototype and a couple of you liked the gameplay and art style. So we thought, why not put more time in it and work on a post jam version with more features. We did that and finished a little game, which has been played by a couple of youtubers, including these two cool Brazilians (video here) and PewDiePie (video here) and we got even more positive feedback from people…That made us realize that maybe there is more to this little idea. We just couldn’t stop working on it 😉

So now we are at a point, where the old free version of the game became the “Classic Edition” and our new version for “Of Carrots And Blood” is now on Steam Greenlight!! 😀

After one week we are currently at 44% to the Top 100 and we need your support!




Of Carrots And Blood is a twin-stick arena shooter combining bullet hell with cute bunnies, mutants and a lot of blood.

You can play alone and compete for the HIGHSCORE.

You can play together in the local CO-OP and beat the short but intense “story mode”.

You can grab a couple of friend and kill each other in 4 player DEATHMATCH (or in the two other 2 player pvp modes)

AND you can play the multiplayer modes ONLINE!!

So if you like some good old arcade action, where you need to be on your toes all the time or die a lot, you should check out our game:

Of Carrots And Blood on Steam Greenlight

VOTE for us, leave a COMMENT and SHARE it with your friends :)

Sly Slime – Revenge On All Players

Posted by
Saturday, August 29th, 2015 11:00 pm


The slime is the most common monster in JRPG. Millions of them were killed by players during the whole video game history. So it’s the time for REVENGE!!

After 72 hours of hard work, we made this game – Sly Slime. It’s visually beautiful, fine-tuned, also brutally hard and unforgiven. You are weak just like your kins, so try your best to survive this bullet hell, sneak and send these players to hell! Give them everything you got!

Please visit our game page here, and don’t hesitate to rate and comment!

Good Game, Good Luck, Have Fun!

Out West Post-Mortem

Posted by
Friday, August 28th, 2015 2:12 am

Well, it’s that time! This has been my first Ludum Dare, and it has been great so far. Thank you for all the support! Right, now onto the important stuff.

Out West Promo Photo

Play “Out West” here!


The Concept:

My goal with this first Ludum Dare was to make something small that could be developed, finished, and played without any major bugs. I had been experimenting with text adventures and pixel art, so I chose Twine as my tool, since it’s very easy to use, can be expanded upon, can incorporate art, and is contained completely in one HTML file that can be hosted anywhere and played by anyone.

Once this choice was made, I decided my secondary goal was to try and create a very tense and atmospheric mood with only text, art, and time, disproving the common notion that text adventures are perceived as boring slogs which appeal to a certain niche audience (myself among them). Granted, I cheated a little by including art, but as a picture is worth a thousand words, I felt it would enhance the gameplay immeasurably.


The Bad:

  • The game is very short. I needed to keep myself in check; my games are prone to feature creep (which is one reason I participated in this jam) and tend to balloon into iii development nightmares which can’t realistically be handled by one person. Even so, I nearly didn’t make the deadline. There are three possible choices early on, and then another three later: These immediately necessitate nine different endings, plus different factors which dictate other variables that require separate endings, plus these all tie into the main ending, which must take into account everything that’s happened in the journey. Due to the exponential complexity being created, I had to cut off many ideas I wanted to incorporate and focus on making satisfying endings for what I had. That isn’t a bad thing in and of itself, but it forced the game to become minuscule, which is a bit more of a problem with text adventures, there being a finite amount of content with a definite end, as opposed to Pacman.
  • There was no time to add in any complex game mechanics. I know: Game mechanics, in a text adventure? Surely you jest! In all seriousness though, I wanted to add in even more interactivity through JavaScript enhancements. Unfortunately, there was no time to properly code anything myself or learn someone’s mod. I worked with what I had, and from the feedback it appears that effort’s been appreciated; But I would have liked to do something like roaming AI characters in the town, with random conversations as possibilities.
  • Almost no animation in the art. Again, this was time related. I didn’t want huge cutscenes, just little touches of animation that would enhance the world, like having the landscape bob up and down as if you were galloping on a horse, or animating flames, weapons, movement, villagers, that sort of thing. Repeating gifs, mostly.
  • The game is very linear. This is partially due to writing and the nature of Twine; the story requires a certain progression, and the creation of atmosphere and mood also require a certain amount of control. That being said, there perhaps could be a free-roam period before the start of this particular sequence which allows you to explore the world a little, or some other stuff which could expand the illusion of choice and open world gameplay.
  • The art. Some have commented how they enjoyed the pixel art, and I’m very happy they do – I’m almost a complete novice at it. In general, I’m quite happy with what I was able to achieve with a fire under my butt and limited art skills. I would like to get a bit better at pixel art and go back and polish up some of the imagery to facilitate better immersion in the world.


The Good:

  • The art. Again, I’m a pixel art beginner, and I’m frankly amazed that I was able to finish up all of it in time, and that it’s all decent. Nothing looks horribly out of place, and I’m actually a little proud of the final image that’s revealed at the very end. Gives me hope of improvement in the future.
  • The writing. This wasn’t my opinion all the way through; as I was writing the adventure I was horribly aware that, since it’s a text adventure, everything relies on the writing, and if I messed it up or it simply wasn’t good, the whole thing would collapse with almost nothing to salvage. That said, the feedback that I’ve received about the writing has been positive, with several mentions of it being very well written. I breath a sign of relief. Moving on.
  • I finished it. As with many game development beginners, I fall into the trap of being overly ambitious, even with text adventures. I am glad I put down my foot and had a very strict goal in mind. Though I had to work until the deadline because the art took more time that I anticipated, I still managed to incorporate all the stuff I had planned for this tiny little thing.
  • People seem to enjoy it! I’ll be honest, this was a nerve-wracking experience for me (especially ticking the little “Anonymous Feedback” box). I have never done a game jam before, and had no idea what would be said about something I made. I wasn’t expecting anything, but just the fact that someone enjoyed the experience the way I attempted to craft it is a wonderful feeling. Thank you all again for your feedback. It’s appreciated. And thanks to everyone who’s games I’ve played: They’re all wonderful, fascinating and strange! Well done!



I think I’ll work on this some more, give it a bit more of an edge. I’ll have to be careful: I don’t want to bloat the experience or dilute the atmosphere. We’ll see where it goes. Five minutes of story is vastly different from a three act structure. Either way, this has been an eye opening experience. If you play Out West, I hope you enjoy it. Good luck to everyone!

The Empty: My first time at Ludum Dare

Posted by
Tuesday, August 25th, 2015 11:11 am

After struggling with several bugs, constant black outs during development and a flu, I managed to make it to the compo!

I made this game using solely MagicaVoxel, a free voxel editor that is open source and super kickass!

My game (link to Ludum Dare profile) for this theme is a clone of basic cat and the mouse game. Everything was done by me. You can find out about the story by activating certain beacons when collapsing on them.

HighresScreenshot00000 HighresScreenshot00001 HighresScreenshot00002 HighresScreenshot00003

I’ll be adding a HTML 5 version soon enough. Everything was done in Unreal Engine 4. I wanted to make the game to look like a raycast game from the Doom era. Hope you like it!

Movement: WASD+mouse
Attack: Left Click.

How to run:

First be sure to have UE4 pre-requisites installed. You can find them in:

<Folder Name>\TheEmpty\Engine\Extras\Redist\en-us

Then go ahead and run the game by running the .exe on the root folder.



Source (Project)

Another great Ludum Dare, Submitted!

Posted by (twitter: @PandaDima)
Sunday, August 23rd, 2015 10:04 pm

So my game is called Plothole.
It should’ve been an adventure/mystery game about a detective who investigates some of the recent murders that might be a a job of one serial killer. SPOILER: in the end the detective would uncover that his 2nd (schizophrenic) self is in fact that serial killer.

In reality Plothole is an unfinished game with only core functionality and not much content at all. (Art is really hard and slow for me)



After thoughts:

Amazing Ludum Dare! Even though I once again haven’t finished a game, I totally loved (almost, that missing boolean not bug costed me 2 hours of work) each second of it! I learned a lot about Unity’s new UI system, discovered new game genre I might like and wanted to do and finish! I had great time overall, nice to get distracted from some unpleasantness that happens around. I hope everybody had amazing time too, here’s to another great Ludum Dare, and for many more!

I always shared my LD brainstorming results after LD, so here goes: Although I usually did it in Google Drive, I try to move away from Cloud Storage, coz I am paranoid.


  • To Mr. Mike Kasprzak, for Ludum Dare itself and still maintaining it, and even making a new version!
  • To Unity Engine Team, for amazing Game Engine.
  • To… Microsoft, for Visual Studio and C#
  • To All the Open Source developers, for everything! Much love <3
  • To Ludum Dare’ers, for amazing community! 😀
  • To Zhoot, AtomicVikings, yuraSniper, Leo, Skай, Zet and Thok, Jorge and my family, for being there.
  • To Caffeine, for keeping me alive. XOXO

Cookie Monster Got Nothing On Me. Finally Finished!

Posted by (twitter: @kidando)
Sunday, August 23rd, 2015 9:03 pm

Runner 2015-08-24 04-34-51-525 Runner 2015-08-24 04-35-02-225 Runner 2015-08-24 04-35-07-904 Runner 2015-08-24 04-35-17-971 Runner 2015-08-24 04-36-19-514

Barely made it. 1 minute more and I would died from anxiety :D.

The game is finally here.

Give it try and please rate.

My first entry to ludum dare; Monster Twins!

Posted by (twitter: @@Crazu1)
Sunday, August 23rd, 2015 4:26 pm


This is a puzzle platformer with it own kinky twist. One of the twins defies physics and hangs around ceiling like it’s nobody’s problem. :) It was fun to make. I wish I had started making it earlier so it would be much longer. But anyway you take what you get. 😉

Monster Twins

Done…..Monster Of All Trades

Posted by
Sunday, August 23rd, 2015 4:12 pm

Compo Entry finished, kept it simple (2 kids and a Game Jam do not make light work) but it as my own work (if without sound) Its a 1 player card game where you play through a story deck of cards and use your own deck to overcome different encounters using the 3 tools at any monsters disposal, being scary, being spooky or being cuddly. Didn’t get to blog much about the progress so added some art below.  In the end weren’t we all monsters……


Frankenstein’s Monsters, Inc. Released

Posted by (twitter: @AtkinsSJ)
Sunday, August 23rd, 2015 3:49 pm

Frankenstein’s Monsters, Inc. is done. Huzzah!! Give it a go at (Playable as HTML5 in browser, or as a Java download.)

Had a small panic last-minute when I had to rewrite some things for the HTML5 build to work, but it’s all sorted now.

To everyone still working: You can do it! 😀

Postmortem: ChromaGun

Posted by (twitter: @lochmannapps)
Friday, July 24th, 2015 7:48 am

ChromaGun preview

ChromaGun was our entry to Ludum Dare #32. The concept’s inception came late at night after a few (ahem) beers. The theme was “an unconventional weapon”, and we decided to go with color. The player’s objective is to paint walls and enemies with the “ChromaGun”. Enemies are attracted to walls of the same color and float towards them. This core mechanic, paired with elements such as button-triggered doors, deadly electrified tiles and particle grids which only allow bullets to pass through, created some seriously entertaining gameplay, even in the early stages of development.

Get it on the AppStore


Hey guys,

although we haven’t been able to participate in Ludum Dare this time we still would like to show you our last game, which would have been quite fitting for this theme…you are a bunny defending a giant carrot and killing mutants with, well, CARROTS! 😀 We have been working on our last LD31 Jam entry “Of Carrots And Blood” and we have released it on for free for Windows and Mac and it is also coming out on Desura soon. We have added powerups, different enemy types, a global highscore for the single player and we have also added a local 2 player Co-op mode (which is the most fun) with a big boss fight surprise in the end! So please check it out :)


Download OF CARROTS AND BLOOD on here!

Of Carrots And Blood



OCAB screenshot #01

OCAB Kissing bunnies


And for those of you who already know the Jam version, it would be really cool, if you could compare the two versions and tell us here in the comments, if we applied your feedback for the better or worse 😉 More feedback much appreciated!


Download OF CARROTS AND BLOOD on here!

Of Carrots And Blood


Thanks, have fun playing :)

Chris and Sebastian

Pre-Ending Post Plus Plugs in hope of Payoff

Posted by (twitter: @@chromebookbob)
Sunday, May 10th, 2015 10:59 am


Sorry for the alliteration!

My text adventure has had some great feedback but I would still love for more people to play it:

Click Here!


Also, a few of my text games (You can play them right now here!), including this one are going to be part of‘s new freeware section when that comes out, so that’s cool.

Anyway, thanks for everything, and PLAY MY GAME PLEASE!!


Music from our Ludum game – Does It Shoot?

Posted by
Friday, May 8th, 2015 7:03 am

Ludum game page – Does It Shoot?

Baby’s First Post-Mortem: Score Attack!

Posted by
Sunday, May 3rd, 2015 5:03 pm

Score Attack! Post-Mortem

Main Screen

Hello all, I go by Boateye on the internet, but you can call me boateye, since we’re instant best friends!

This was my very first Ludum Dare, but second Game Jam (I did the most recent miniLD #58). And I learned quite a bit. As such, I’ll hold up game dev tradition and make my first ever Post-Mortem!

What went well:

  • Making my own pixel art for the game was surprisingly fun!
  • I was able to effectively reuse some of the sounds that I made for my Mini LD#58 entry,  Combat Pong, which saved me a bunch of time.
  • The game was actually fun to playtest! This is a first for the games I have made.
  • This slightly ore abstract theme was much better and easier to implement than my original idea
  • The shooting and flying feels really good.  One of the main details that I ike to focus on is “Game Feel”, and I think that this is my best effort so far.
  • The central mechanic of using different amounts of your own score to kill enemies was fun for people like me who want to get maximum value from every action in a game. Trump, and Lous Scott-Vaargas would be proud :)
  • The upgrades were fun to implement.
  • The enemies spawning and moving in the background of the title, ending and upgrade screen were an accident, but it ended up looking nicer than what I had planned. I love moments like these during game development!
  • is a really great website for hosting games online. I encourage anyone who has not tried them yet to host their next project on there.
  • Feedback is very positive!


What went less than well

  • There was a bug where the enemies weren’t awarding the right amount of points to the player
  • The Smart bomb wasn’t working at the time of release. It was now adding the accurate amount of score based on enemies killed. That is now mostly fixed.
  • I wasn’t able to implement mini-health bars for the regular enemies that require multiple hits to help the player find the most effecient way of killing enemies.
  • I was not able to implement good tutorial levels to teach the player the main schtick of the game, outside of the game’s text description which no one reads :p
  • Art is unremarkable, but functional.
  • There aren’t as many levels as I would like. The game is very short.


Overall, I feel that Score Attack was a success for my first proper LD game. More things went well than wrong, and even the things that went wrong were easily fixable post-jam. I’m really proud of Score attack, and I encourage you to check it out if you like Shmups!


Play and rate Score Attack!


Posted by (twitter: @chikun_dev)
Sunday, April 26th, 2015 11:23 pm



‘You Can Shave The Baby’ is a minigame experience that harks to the time-honoured Warioware minigames with a special dash of bizarre tasks that require the user to suspend their disbelief – and their sanity. The inspiration of the game draws from a series of weird and wonderful in-jokes Josef and I developed, incorporating elements from previous games we have made (all of which are available on our website).
If you haven’t played it yet – check it out! Find it here, or on our site at




‘I want to make a weird game’. So we made one. Originally going down the avenue of wanting a hybrid horror-adventure in the vein of Yume Nikki, the project immediately turned into something else at the start of the jam.
The basic coding for the minigame format was fairly simple and self-contained once it was complete. In the vein of making minigames via Warioware: DIY the logic behind the games was easy: it needed,

(1) a timer, countdown and increasing speed,
(2) a win and lose state,
(3) different modes of user input that triggered success in minigames, and
(4) a life and score system to add progress.

After that, development was smooth sailing and the major focus of the programming was to tailor elements (2) and (3) to the unique specifications of each minigame.



As Josef was doing this it was up to me to ascertain the creative direction we wanted to take to give the minigames their personality, whilst retaining the challenge of the game. We made up a list of potential minigames, incorporating a basic description, and the win/loss states of each minigame.

Despite the bizarre nature of the game, many of the concepts revolved around non-sequitur comments, running jokes or references to previous games:

  • Aphrodite in the ‘disguise’ minigame was a character in Turtle Simulator.
  • ‘Don’t Spook The Bird’ is based on a photo of a sulphur-crested cockatoo I took at a nature reserve and features in
  • I wrote a short story called ‘Pizza Pants’ at six in the morning at the Global Game Jam in Sydney. It stands as the only written example of pizza fetishism in literature.




All in all the game came together relatively efficiently, unlike the tension of previous Dares. My only concern during development was that we would not create enough minigames to sustain the interest of players – using the base 30 minigames in a level of WarioWare, I think there was always room to expand.
We came up with few actual challenges during development, but one large roadblock manifested in the last few hours of the Jam – a major storm hit the coast of NSW, Australia, and caused power outages that ended up lasting for a week from that very night. Fortunately, when the power went out on the morning of the last day, most of the work was complete – it was only a matter of uploading the game via phone and praying for electricity.




So what did we learn from making the game? How could we improve the baby game?
(1) Develop more varied and innovative game mechanics
Due to time constraints, many of the minigames revolved around either using the arrow keys on the keyboard to steer the direction of an object, or hovering or clicking the cursor to highlight a change in a graphic. Making tattoos, shaving babies, and putting on makeup all rely on the same fundamental mechanic. With more time to develop ideas we could have certainly provided the player with a more engaging and challenging experience.

(2) Actually related to the theme
A common criticism of our game was that it had nothing to do with the theme. This is completely correct – Josef asked me, “Ryan, how does this relate to the theme?” I replied to the effect of who cares. At the end I think I implemented some tenuous intro theme about coming across a hacking weapon in the form of a floppy disk, but the plot was certainly a last minute ass-pull. We made the game for the abstract minigames, and that’s about it.

(3) More animation and graphics for seamless game experience
Though the simplicity of the minigames in WarioWare are simple, there’s a lot going on in the animation department. With more time we could have implemented fades and transitions between the opening cinematics, provided more animations to gague success and failure, and actually provided an ending to give an end goal and thus closure to players after the novelty of the minigames wears off.





Regardless, it’s clear from the feedback we got that people feel ‘You Can Shave The Baby’ was unique in style and memorable. That’s all we could ever ask for.


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