Posts Tagged ‘analysis’

What Ludum Dare Rating Categories Matter Most?

Posted by
Wednesday, April 13th, 2016 11:23 am

When we reach the end of a Ludum Dare event and evaluate each others’ games, we grade each game with a series of categories: Overall, Fun, Coolness, Graphics, Audio, Theme, Innovation, Humor, and Mood. When the results are announced, the top 100 games in each category are displayed, and of course it is every competitor’s dream to land in at least one of those top-100 lists.

The Overall category holds pride-of-place. Arguably, the winner of the Overall category is the winner of the event. It’s satisfying to do well in the other categories, but until you’re ranked #1 Overall, there is still room for growth in your Ludum Dare performance.

Which brings me to this question: Have you ever wondered which other categories make the biggest difference in how you rank overall? For example, do people who do well Overall also tend to do especially well in Graphics, or Theme, or Innovation? Coolness is a measure of how much you played other peoples’ games; does a great Coolness ranking help you achieve a good Overall ranking? If you want to succeed Overall, does it pay to focus on Fun, or Graphics, or Audio, or Mood?

If you’re anything like me, you’re just itching to know.

And now you can.

 

For the last several Ludum Dare events I’ve analyzed the relationships between category rankings by looking at the scores of the top 100 Compo entries. In each event I’ve analyzed the correlation between how games did in each of the nine categories. What I’ve found is that there are strong correlations, and they’re not necessarily what you would expect.

Take a look at this.

Correlations per Event

Correlations per Event

What you see here is a chart of how well each category did relative to the Overall category in each of the last eleven LD events. The blue line represents Fun, for example. This shows that more than any other category, Fun correlates strongly with Overall. If you do well in Fun, you tend to do well overall; if you do poorly in Fun, you tend to do poorly overall.

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LD34 Visualisation and Analysis

Posted by (twitter: @jezzamonn)
Saturday, January 23rd, 2016 7:01 am

TD;LR? Just look at the pretty pictures.

Hi all!

Before I begin, lets just remember Correlation != Causation

So, using the data that “” scraped from this Ludum Dare, I created some plots showing how each of the different categories correlate with the overall category. Here’s the lot of them (It’s a big image, so click to see it full size). Compo games are blue dots, and Jam games are red.

ld34 correlations

There’s a quite few interesting things there, but here’s a few little points.

As we’ve seen from previous analyses (Google told me that’s the plural of analysis) of Ludum Dares, the fun category has the highest correlation with the overall category, and humour correlates the least.

Another interesting thing is that the audio category is split for Jam and Compo games. You’re more likely to get a better overall score with the same audio score if you entered a Compo game, perhaps suggesting people are more forgiving for average audio in Compo games.

The ID plot may seem meaningless, except that IDs are given sequentially, and so it roughly shows what score people got in relation to how long they’ve been around Ludum Dare. It’s slightly skewed in favour of veterans, but not much, showing that newbies have just as good of a chance of making a great game.

 

But what I wanted to focus on is how the number of votes you got relates to the overall rating you get.

ld34 votes vs score

Now, this plot is a little hard to read because there’s so many people clustered up in the left, which hides the significance a little bit. You can see a slight upward trend as you get more votes, but it’s that clear. If you compare it to the plot of Votes Given vs Overall, you can understand it a bit better.

ld34 votes given vs score
Because there are so many people that cast/received between 20 and 50 votes, you would expect to see more extreme results in that area, just because there are more games. This is what we see with the Votes Given vs Overall plot — as the votes get larger there are less scores near the top and the bottom, mostly because there are less games there and it’s unlikely to get a really good or really bad rating. (That being said, there are some relationships here, but they’re not as significant as in the votes received plot)

In the Votes Received vs Overall plot, we have games that got high ratings with a large number of votes. This would be pretty unlikely if they were unrelated, just because less games got that many votes, indicating that there is a correlation.

But please remember CORRELATION IS NOT CAUSATION!!! It’s totally wrong to say that this means that if you want to do better you should try to get more ratings, because more ratings = higher overall. Instead, we have to say: Ok, there’s a relationship, what theories can we come up with that might explain it.

When you think about it, it would make sense that games that are really good would tend to get more votes, because people share them more.

Even though the general trend is upward, we can also see that there are games that get a lot of votes in a way that’s unrelated to how good the game is, such as people who are hugely popular or do a lot of publicity.

 

Finally, an issue that often comes up is the concerns that games that didn’t get many votes could sneak a high score just by being lucky with the ratings they got. If you look at the plot, there aren’t that many games that didn’t do well that didn’t also get quite a few votes. There are a few, but as there are a lot of games that got a relatively small number of votes, there would also be a lot more if it was entirely up to chance.

This doesn’t mean it’s perfect, just not all that bad.

That’s all for now! Thanks again to Liam for the useful data!

Analysing data: My past 4 #LDJAMs

Posted by (twitter: @tuism)
Tuesday, September 15th, 2015 11:11 am

Thanks for the awesome jam good LD friends! 😀 Thanks for voting and the cool chats and feedback and votes!

 

Had a wonderful #LDJAM this time around, I felt much better about this one than my previous one, both during and after the jam. And that definitely showed in the score :)

pokeLD

So now that I’ve done four LDs (sorry #30, I couldn’t get to you), I can put some kind of data together and see if I can make sense of my performance. And to be honest, it’s baffling.

TuismLDANALYSIS

 

LD32 vs LD33

First, comparing this one to the previous shows a definite improvement, and that I’m really happy about. The previous one was really quite uninspired and rushed, and I’m glad that my approach to this one (not pre-determining what to make before the jam) has yielded far more creative and interesting results.

LD 31 vs LD33

In comparison to my best LD so far, I couldn’t beat it. But hey, that’s really not a major issue. But that feels like an anomaly to me… my LD31 was a purely multiplayer game which meant it was impossible to test, with no Audio to speak of so it scored 0 there, and it was a platformer which was like 80% of other games. Why did it do so well?? Was it genuinely a great game, and I really should work on that one further, or was it an anomaly? WHICH IS IT?? D:

Theme?

PokEscape placing 437th on theme makes me feel kinda sad, because the very first line of the description said “You are the (Poke)Monster!”, which I thought was a great fit for the theme. Which meant that 90% of people who rated the game either missed that line or never read it, or didn’t agree with it. Sigh.

Comment count

I went through my games and roughly counted up how many comments I had on each game, and this last one was a lot higher than the rest by about 50%, which is possibly significant. Was it because this game referenced Pokemon? Or was it due to other factors? I really would like to know how many ratings my past games has. Don’t know where to find that. Sigh.

Adios LD!

It’s been a rad Ludum Dare as usual 😀 After this analysis I think I’ve decided that data analysis is not useful without a sample size of a billion :) So just keep jamming and having fun, making cool shit is the best you can do! Until next time amigos!

 

My Ludum Dare Progress

Posted by (twitter: @TomboFry)
Thursday, May 22nd, 2014 6:20 am

Since I started taking part in Ludum Dare last April, I’ve had loads of fun. What surprises me more is that I do fairly well in each competition as well. Everyone loves graphs, so I made a graph with all the results from each compo I’ve taken part in. The first thing I notice is the “theme” and “innovation” categories. Either I’m obviously not that good at interpreting the theme, or people don’t understand my interpretation of it 😉

Yeah, I know, all my games so far have been 2D platformers… I’ve started learning Unity, so hopefully that will change. There are so many more things you can do with a 3rd dimension! With that being said, it blows my mind to think that I’ve always come in the top 5-10% of games overall.

tombofry-LD29-graph

I know the ratings are over, but if you want to play my Ludum Dare game, feel free to click here!:

Flesh Hunter

MIN(Ball) – By the Numbers

Posted by
Wednesday, May 1st, 2013 5:21 pm

Besides being the premiere minimalistic puzzle platformer featuring a spherical protagonist and submitted by a user whose name begins with “c” and ends in “ahman,” my game MIN(Ball) has a per level high score system.

Looking at my server access logs, I realized the game makes a database access at the end of every level.  A little filtering later, BOOM!  A plot of showing how far players get in the game.  In case anyone likes data, or funny looking plots, I thought I’d share the results:

1May2013

Funnel1May2013

I’ll try to update this picture daily.

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Ghost Town post-mortem is up

Posted by (twitter: @elibrody)
Saturday, December 24th, 2011 10:36 am

I made a post-mortem for my game, “Ghost Town”.

You can click this link with your pointing device to see it!!

“You are me now” ante-mortem

Posted by (twitter: @elibrody)
Thursday, April 29th, 2010 1:50 pm

Post-mortem, being something we may analyze after its untimely passing, strikes me as being the wrong approach. I would like to present a short living analysis; an ante-mortem, if you will.

yippppp yip yip yip yip yip yip

yippppp yip yip yip yip yip yip

Building You are me now was wonderful, mostly because it had closure, but I do not consider it complete. The central idea, using the Islands metaphor as a physical mechanic, falls short of my initial thoughts when considering the theme when it was announced. While walking around Tel Aviv’s Neve Tsedek neighborhood, I chanced upon some graffiti that seemed to fit the idea of making islands stop being islands. (Continued…)

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