Posts Tagged ‘allegro’

Posted by
Friday, April 20th, 2012 1:58 pm

I’m IN for my first official Ludum Dare – I did one miniLD earlier (with pre-made/stolen graphics and music). Now I need to do all graphics and stuff by myself – so not aiming very high this time.

Just installed Visual Studio (C++), and Allegro 5, and created empty project so that is my warm up and weapon of choise, along with Paint .NET for graphics and Bfxr for sound effects.

Now I need to sleep full (oh, 4 hours left -> short) night, and then to start! Exciting…





Posted by
Sunday, August 21st, 2011 4:47 am

Since yesterday I couldn’t submit the pictures and the progress of my game, but meanwhile I did a lot of progress in my game and even drew a cool caption for ludum dare:

Meanwhile the game has temporary graphics and levels:

By now you can move and push stuff around, and now I’m starting to work on story and graphics maybe sound later.

Good morning Ludum Dare!!!

Posted by
Friday, August 19th, 2011 10:59 pm

It’s 08:00 AM here and It’s time to start ludum dare 21!!!
Here’s some pictures of my workbench and my breakfast:

my workbench a healthy breakfast

And something I’ve made about the theme:

Good Luck Everyone!!

I’m in!!!

Posted by
Friday, August 19th, 2011 3:47 pm

Hello everyone!! Ludum Dare 21 starts soon and I wanted to say that “I’m in!!!”
This time I’m going to write my game in c++ using Microsoft Visual Studio 2010:

  • Graphics Engine / Game Engine / Libraries: Allegro 5
  • Sound: SFXR
  • Graphics: GIMP

I hope the this ludum dare will be a lots of fun and good games :)
See you after a good sleep, and Good Luck Everyone!!

PoV’s LD10 Custom Library

Posted by (twitter: @mikekasprzak)
Monday, December 10th, 2007 5:15 pm

Assuming I get around to entering, there’s a good chance I’ll be using this as my foundation, with Allegro.

My “Custom” Library

It’s a collection of header files and code, commonly found in my more recent prototypes. C++.

  • A vector math/matrix library, plus some other math tools. Partially documented! :)
  • A set of functions for drawing circles, lines, and rectangles with Allegro, transformed by a matrix.
  • A collection of string functions to compliment STL String. Mostly for filename manipulations (get the base name, directory only, etc).
  • Class building tools (including the “useful” part of Boost)
  • FileIO with Compression (LZMA, BZIP, ZLIB)

And that’s that.

LD4 preparation: Blobotron

Posted by
Tuesday, December 4th, 2007 10:15 am

For the LD4 in 2004, we did a series of preparation compos. They were much shorter as a real LD, and as theme had the remake of an agreed upon classic game. One of them was Robotron (the others were Sapce Invaders, Frogger and Spy Hunter). In the Robotron one you had 4.8 hours for the game. My entry turned out to be a much better game than the one I actually wrote with 10 times as much time for the real LD. Oh well.


The game is rather simple. One directional input (cursor keys) controls the movement of the pink blob, another one (ASDW) controls the gun. Just like in the original.


There’s 30 partially random levels, and quite a lot of different enemies with unique behaviors.


Some of them, like the crab and the spider, were added in a post-compo version. Those are really hard (but fun, this is one of the few of my games I play through occasionally), as is the final boss. The crabs circle you, and the spider tries to aim ahead when shooting – back then I was still good at calculus, apparently :) The final boss doesn’t shoot you directly, but takes a lot of hits and spawns random enemies.

LD 0.5? Entry: Dicey Ducks

Posted by
Sunday, December 2nd, 2007 4:03 pm

I don’t know what the theme for this Non-Compo was (I think there wasn’t one), but I made a yahtzee clone. Much more than a clone, though, it is far more complicated than Yahtzee, allowing you to score a bunch of different ways.

Dicey Ducks

As you can see, there are 2 colors of normal ducks, and a King Duck. So you can score in the Same column if your dice involved are the same color, the Diff column if any different ones are involved, and in the King column if the King is involved. The High column is one you can use if you ever get another column twice, but your second time is a better score than the first. It makes some sense when you play it. And to stop a die from being thrown on subsequent rolls, you put the ducks to sleep (as you can see in the picture).

This was my first actual 3D game! Well, my most finished 3D game (even though it’s not finished). Those dice are pure 3D, hand coded from scratch. Take that! Their rolling is real, not just a visual representation of a random number generator – they get a random spin on all axes when thrown, and wherever they stop when they land is what they are on. The code to interpret their facing into a number was the tricky part.

Too bad for you, you can’t play it – there is no downloadable version at this time.

LD6 entry: Photon

Posted by
Friday, November 30th, 2007 8:57 am

Photon was my entry to LD6. The theme was “Light and darkness”. I still remember all the time I fiddled with shadow calculations. In my game, each light source does exact shadow calculations with all the level geometry – and in order to still have it all run with < 1% CPU, this was quite some work. Now, there’s nothing special about this except, I wanted to do things in the most simple way possible, this being an LD. And I had to admit utter defeat when I later saw bluescrn’s entry. Instead of spending half of the 48 hours on it like me, he went for a dead simple approach – with the only difference that his was not 100% accurate. Which would have made no visual difference in my game whatsoever. In fact his shadow method would have worked a lot better in my game in just about every respect :)

I still managed to do quite well. Here’s some screenshots from back then:


The title screen.


The goal of the game is to send all the photons coming from the lamp to the prism, but the problem is, you only can see the areas of the map which are lit up by the moving photons.


To control the photons, you can place mirrors – to light up more areas of a level, and once you have found the prism, send them all to it.

Seems the original submission is still up: original zip at original site

Random Dungeon Exploration

Posted by
Thursday, November 29th, 2007 11:29 am

Random Dungeon Exploration is the result of trying to push the Random theme as far as possible. It got random levels, random enemies, random quests (well, a little bit random!), random items, random player names, and random events. I guess it could have been even more random, but time was a limiting factor.

As for the actual gameplay, it’s fairly simple step based dungeon crawling. And a ‘town’ screen where you can shop and select dungeons. It felt pretty solid, but there were a lot of balancing issues that you’d notice once you reached some higher levels.


The game was well received, placing second in the ‘Fun’ and ‘Production’ categories, and also getting the ‘Best In Show’ UBER prize.

You can get the slightly improved post compo version, or the compo version. Both are for Windows and OpenGL.

The Destruction of the Viruses

Posted by
Wednesday, November 28th, 2007 10:58 am

The Destruction of the Viruses was a fairly ambitious (but not very innovative) game written for the Infection theme. The player had to clean out the insides of a computer by killing all the viruses that resided there. The viruses could clone themselves, so it wasn’t always that easy.

It played like a top-down shooter, with FPS controls, and used OpenGL to draw a level that could be rotated around the player.


There were many good intentions, and much love for the number 5 (there being 5 levels, 5 enemy types, and 5 weapon types), yet the game failed badly. The biggest mistake was a bug which made some parts of the game framerate dependent, leaving it extremely hard if you had a low framerate (it played as intended at about 180 FPS). It’s hard to say how it would have fared without the bug, but as it were, it placed about 23th.

You can get the compo version, or its source, if you want to, but I really must urge you not to! Better to get the ‘made working dist’ released a few days after the deadline. Both of them are for Windows and OpenGL.

I have an even better version around somewhere, that I haven’t packaged and released yet. I’ll do that soon, and then I’ll include it here.


Posted by
Tuesday, November 27th, 2007 12:52 pm

Swarm was my entry to LD8. The theme of was, well… “swarm”. I know, I know, I’m no good with coming up with names for my entries. Anyway, for this game, I coded an entire 3D engine (octree based) from scratch. So, I spent most of the 48 hours debugging octree code, and crammed in some gameplay towards the end. Since I never spend more time on gameplay – it still should be as fun to play as most of my games :)


This is an in-development screenshot, showing some octree debugging going on.


That’s how the game looks like. Shoot down all the pink, eyed balls to encounter the uber-cool-final-boss-with-superior-AI. (I got feedback suggesting that at least one person actually played long enough to encounter the boss – so I consider the gameplay aspect successful.)

Here’s a mirror of the original submission: Swarm

The Destruction of the Sheep

Posted by
Tuesday, November 27th, 2007 11:30 am

Having learnt some great lessons from my previous LD48 entry, Save The Hut, I decided to not include as much boringness, confusion and frustration in my next game. Together with the theme Construction/Destruction, and a cosmetic theme of Sheep, it all became so obvious: I was to make a game where you construct traps to destruct sheep. And lo and behold! there was The Destruction of the Sheep.


I decided to use pretty much the same tech as for Save The Hut, but used it better to get some fancier stuff, like sub tile precision movements, rotated sprites, pseudo 3D particle gibs, and paintable background.

The game was supposed to be a puzzle game, but in the end only a few levels were puzzly, the rest was just mindless, but entertaining, sheep destruction with lots of gore. All in all, it worked out very well, making me a winner in ‘fun’ and ‘complete’ categories, and third in ‘gameplay (innovation?)’ and ‘overall’.

There’s an improved version available, adding some fixes, and a 2x time speed-up button (but there remains at least two bugs and a lot of spelling errors). You can get this version of The Destruction of the Sheep as a .zip archive or as an installer. They’re for Windows.

The original compo version is also available, both for DOS and for Windows (the Windows .exe was kindly provided by Hamumu during the compo). There’s also the source.


Posted by
Monday, November 26th, 2007 12:35 pm

Hydra was my entry to LD7. The theme was “growth”. It’s a top-down shooter, where you play a growing hydra.


At the start, the hydra is merely a small worm – and even a single knight who has set out to kill you is a dangerous foe.


Some levels later and after eating lots of knights, the Hydra has reached quite some size. But, there’s now also more knights, and they also got bigger and stronger.


The final form when you win the game – I doubt anyone ever has encountered this without using cheat codes.

Download: original LD7 submission (no idea if it still works on modern systems)


Posted by
Monday, November 26th, 2007 11:54 am

Insanity was my entry to LD4. The topic was “infection”. My idea was somewhat far-fetched and only in the story – the home town of Ian the janitor is befallen by an infection of insanity – so he has to beat up all the scientists at his workplace to find the cause of the infection and a cure.


Since I messed up the base engine (tried to somehow stuff the 3D into 2D), I wasn’t able to finish. There’s just one level with place holder graphics, but the level can’t be won and so the story never reaches its conclusion.

Gnome Guard

Posted by
Monday, November 26th, 2007 11:22 am

Gnome Guard was my entry to LD1 – theme guardian. In the game, you are confronted with a horde of small gnome children, and have to safely guard them home after school.

Gnome Guard

The title screen

Gnome Guard

The gnomes will run towards the green pillar, and avoid the red pillar.

Gnome Guard

But only if they feel like it.

The original download is mirrored here – no idea if the game itself still works: download link

Save The Hut

Posted by
Monday, November 26th, 2007 11:16 am

Save The Hut was my very first entry into the world of ‘make a game in a low amount of hours’ compos. It was all about The Hut, and how to Save it from the hut-hungry alien invaders. The player had to make sure The Hut survived for a certain amount of time. To achieve this, stuff could be built, but there was a limit set by the amount of credits available. It played as a mix of RTS and puzzle.


Featuring 10 levels, 8 bit palette graphics awesomeness, developed for DOS using Allegro and DJGPP, it placed about 14th. Its shortcomings seemed to be that people had trouble figuring it out, had real trouble passing level 3 (The Holy Cactuses, which was pretty hard), had trouble running DOS games, and also found ‘hold out for X seconds’ extremely annoying (because it sucks to fail at ‘2 seconds left’ and have to replay the level).

You can download a newer, slightly improved version (for Windows) of Save The Hut as a .zip archive, or as an installer. Or, you could get the old compo version (for DOS).

[cache: storing page]