Posts Tagged ‘adventure’

Generation Ship Post Mortem

Posted by
Thursday, August 28th, 2014 9:40 pm

IMG_25082014_111805Our game

 

Our game started as one idea and changed many times through development. After some not-so-good entries on former LDs we strongly decided to use Unity this time. We’ve started to learn it some time before this LD especially for this one purpose. And everything worked out well, I suppose. Somehow this Ludum Dare wasn’t nearly as stressfull as former ones, even though we were struggling with ideas elaboration a lot.

We’ve started with an idea to make a puzzle game about a giant abandoned fleet of starships, endlessly slow moving to there god-knows-what destination and one man, who tries to reach one special ship by managing different ships on his way. Core of the gameplay back than was all about docking ships together, connecting them and their tiny ecosystems in order to change this little worlds. It was a not-so-straight development of out theme, Connected Worlds. I thought it was one smooth idea, but then we discussed it and understood that it was pretty much too simple, it seemed more complex than it really was. So we ended up with a game about only one ship and all the living things aboard it.

First time using Unity for such a complex thing terrified us, especially after our former entries, which ended up pretty undone and later on abandoned. So we tried to make our game a 2d side-scroller. In half a day we would say “Fuck everyhting, we want to make something big and cool”. So we moved to a 3D state.

IMG_24082014_195532

First glance on 3D version

Some time ago we realised we are getting well, we have a solid gameplay, we have a good start platform thanks to Unity and were thinking on how to make our game better. And here goes AI. We were looking for a voice actress for a whole day, asking on LD IRC channel, asking our friends to participate. Anyone to participate in our project for free. And than we found Polina, the magnificent voice of our AI. We’ve written all the phrases in a short period of time and she made a voice-over and added filters. Our AI got her voice.

That was truly a great experience after all, not only to take a part in that competition, which happened trice before, but to actually finish a game, to see how it growth even more than you hoped to see. Everything went perfect this time and we regret nothing.

Click-Text-Adventure for Ludum Dare

Posted by
Wednesday, August 27th, 2014 12:52 pm

A Text-Adventure at Ludum Dare. That might be rare. But anyways we did it. If would like to play a text adventure go this way.

 

>Play the Game<

Bildschirmfoto vom 2014-08-27 20:54:13

Bildschirmfoto vom 2014-08-27 20:52:45

At this game you have a conversation with a player character and you can make him do something  for you. It comes with hopefully funny dialogues and some hidden gimmicks.

 

This game connects 6 different games created at the same location. At certain points you should play one of these games to go on. Anyways, if you dont like to play them there are spoilers that gives you the passwords to go on.

 

Have fun

 

New Dawn — Postmortem

Posted by
Sunday, May 4th, 2014 2:58 pm

New Dawn was the first Ludum Dare entry for both members of our team, and the first game jam/compo of any sort that we’ve done. We went in with little preparation and an overdose of optimism, but overall it came out pretty well! We weren’t able to do as much as we’d hoped – that probably goes for everyone here – but we finished in 72 hours and still came up with a solid little game.

We had a general idea of what we wanted to make before LD started: some kind of mini-RPG or adventure game. We couldn’t help brainstorming as we were voting on themes, and we really liked the idea of setting the game in a dystopia. A few of the themes could’ve made that setting difficult, but luckily for us,“Beneath the Surface” fit really well. It led to an interesting post-apocalyptic setting where the action takes place underground because the surface is no longer habitable. Plus, a dystopian setting was perfect for adding layers of secrets and false pretenses, which meant we could interpret the theme both literally and figuratively. We didn’t get to do as much of the latter as we originally planned, but we think it still comes through pretty well.

Although we started with the idea of a “mini-RPG,” we knew we probably wouldn’t have time to add many RPG elements. As it turned out, we ended up just sticking to a point-and-click adventure game. In order to have time to code extra RPG features, like a combat system, we would’ve had to spend less time on art and the dialogue system. That would have led to a very different kind of game, not necessarily a bad one, but we felt New Dawn would be better served by focusing on the story and the atmosphere. Having a better dialogue system and more detailed art helped to strengthen the story and atmosphere, whereas RPG mechanics wouldn’t really add as much in that sense. That said, if we had more time, we would have liked to add those as well.

New Dawn

New Dawn — A subterranean dystopia

Individual Thoughts:

Stefan (Coding, Art, Concept/Gameplay Design): Going in I knew I was going to use Unity (and C#), along with 2D Toolkit. I had laid out a basic plan which was to try to implement all the features by the end of the first 24 hours, then all the art by the end of the second 24 hours, and leave the third day for testing, bugfixing, and polish. I did this because I know that games always take longer than you expect, so this gave us some room to work with and helped curb our ambitions and expectations. As it turned out, this was a great idea, because although I did finish all the crucial features in the first 24 hours, the art ended up taking much longer and wasn’t done until well into the third day (and I didn’t sleep at all Sunday night either!).

Ultimately I’m a programmer, not an artist, so I’m not very efficient at that stuff because I haven’t done it much. However another big reason it took so long is that while 2D Toolkit is very convenient, it has some very tedious interface problems that require manually doing repetitive actions over and over, which really should be automated. These actions can be automated by script, but at the time I wasn’t sure if the amount of time it would take to write those scripts would be less than the time it takes to do the stuff manually. In retrospect, I think for the amount of art we had it probably wouldn’t have saved us that much. However, if I could do it over again, I would have set up those automation extensions to 2D Toolkit before LD started, because that definitely would have saved a lot of time.

The art itself also took a lot of time because I chose to put a lot of detail into it, despite it being very low-res pixel art. The details are largely in the shading, which ate up a lot of time, especially for the tilesets which required many different versions of each wall tile in order for the shading to match up. This also meant more work for Olivia when placing the tiles to build out the levels. The shading, especially on the tiles, is a very subtle effect, which I don’t think most people would notice unless they’re familiar with how tilesets work and are specifically thinking about it (which you usually don’t do when you play a game even if you are familiar with how it works). However, I still think it was worth it to spend this extra time, because although most people won’t consciously recognize that the shading is there, when it isn’t there it really stands out and looks noticeably worse. In particular, I think the atmosphere of the game was really well served by the extra shading detail. After drawing the basic shape and applying the shading, I also applied a noise filter to all except the character sprites to give them a bit of extra grit which I think fits the setting well.

On the third day, once the art was finally completed, we only had a few hours left before the submission deadline. At this point I implemented a few extra features that I didn’t consider crucial, most notably the ability for NPCs to move. At this point it struck me that the ending we were planning was going to be very anticlimactic; so I decided to spend the rest of the time quickly building out an additional final level to provide a more climactic ending, while Olivia was finishing up the penultimate level. I think this was definitely a good decision in the end, however it was risky, because we ended up cutting it very close; if it wasn’t for the submission grace period we would have missed the deadline. But overall it definitely makes the game feel much more satisfying when you finish it, so I’m glad I made that choice.

Olivia (Writing, World/Level Design, Music): We knew the general kind of story we wanted to tell before LD started, so once the theme was announced I started hashing out the details. I spent most of the first day planning the overall plot, with input from Stefan, and writing descriptions/dialogue for generic NPCs and a few items. Though I didn’t implement them that day, all of those descriptions made it into the game, and really helped the world feel more inhabited. I also wrote text for an intro screen which eventually turned into our game page’s description.

Saturday and Sunday were mostly spent setting up levels: I’m pretty new to level design, and that turned into a huge, unexpected time sink. One of the original “exterior” areas I’d made was close to the size of a real city block – way more space than we had time to fill with interesting stuff! That time would’ve been much better spent populating the existing areas and doing additional writing, but…lesson learned. I said goodbye to my hopes of having all the levels finished by midday Sunday, and had to cut a plot branch and simplify the remaining ones to make sure I’d have time to finish the story.

Monday was mostly a rush to implement the last of the plot. Thankfully I’d planned it all and written some of it beforehand. The penultimate level, two crucial dialogue trees, and two optional but pretty significant NPCs didn’t exist in-game until late Monday afternoon. I also wrote the second (and shortest) part of our music that day, since I wanted at least a little variety. In our rush to submit, there wasn’t time to put the intro text on a starting screen, but that’s something I definitely plan to fix post-comp.

There were a few things I’d hoped to fit in, even with the deadline looming, that didn’t make it. The main one was a set of PA speaker announcements (in the form of text dialogue) which would’ve given more backstory and context to the world. I also wanted to implement sound effects – we’d made a bunch in bfxr – and additional music. My next priority would probably have been adding waypoints so generic NPCs can move and putting more decorations and ambient descriptions throughout the world. In spite of all those cuts, though, we still managed to tell a complete story in 72 hours, and I’m pretty happy with it.

What We Learned:

After we submitted the game, we got a lot of great feedback from commenters. Several people had problems with the click-to-move interface, and since we didn’t anticipate that we hadn’t put in any alternate control schemes (though our post-LD update lets you click and hold, which should alleviate much of the problem). We also made the main quest a little easier to figure out in some post-LD tweaks, since several people were getting stuck. Additionally, given the amount of content we had to cut due to the time limit, some of the areas ended up feeling a little empty. They probably should’ve been shrunk down. On the whole, though, the story and art that we had came together really well, and we ended up with a short but atmospheric adventure game.

LD was a great experience, and it really motivated us to make a game of our own from start to finish. We might do something totally different next time around, but we’ll definitely be there!

We hope our game will be for you at least some much fun to play as for us to create it!
Tell us what you think!
TheMeaningOfLife1

What lies Beneath Mr.Perfect !

Sunday, April 27th, 2014 11:16 pm

Here’s my first ever Ludum Dare attempt and it was pretty intense having to finish a game from start to finish in such a short time (Considering the fact that all kinds of distractions occurs during that exact time, opportunities & work comes up unexpectedly, unintended guests arriving, friends coming to play, power failure due to bad weather etc etc) .

Logo_mrperfect

 Play Beneath Mr.Perfect

Anyway the Game “Beneath Mr.Perfect” is a sidescrolling, narrative sort of adventure(?) game where you play as the Mr.Perfect who thinks himself as a noble man, have a hatred for those around who he thinks as bad. The Game takes you to the journey through his life’s changing phase where he confronts his own hidden emotions and his attempts to repair the damage.

Ss2

The Game was inspired by many of my own experiences and also inspired by many psychological research papers regarding self delusion, beliefs, ego etc. I may have gone a little too literally about the concepts of mind and self esteem, might even have generalized a bit (but actually its about one guy, Mr. Perfect). Have a go at the game and let me know your thoughts regarding it, or similar kind of experience you’ve faced.

We are Datamosh! We’re in, BTW!

Posted by (twitter: @@DatamoshGames)
Sunday, April 27th, 2014 6:38 am

This is how our game looks so far! We got the main character animated and right now we are making the levels. NEVER GIVE UUUP!

mockup_datamosh_ld29_01

Diver game sneak peek

Posted by (twitter: @teambrookvale)
Saturday, April 26th, 2014 4:11 pm

Hi,

This is our first entry to Ludum Dare so we’re very excited. The prototype works and the art is almost finalised. We are working hard to finish our game in the next 2 days. In the meantime here’s a sneak peek of our game.

TriumphOfTheDiverFromTeamBrookvale

[ My Tenth Adventure ] : few words

Posted by
Friday, August 30th, 2013 4:44 am

 

Hi!

I’m trying to write a postmortem, but so far I’m not very good at it.
The first day I started the stream on Twitch. If you’re interested, you can watch the record. But it will be available some time (problems with uploading).

 

In the game was more important animation and sound. So I’m not worried at the expense of code. It there is very little and it is very simple. And anyway I am very bad programmer. So I decided to focus on the atmosphere of the game.

 

I had an idea in my head to make the main character of the game by myself. Just fun to see myself as the main character in the video game. The character really took over some of my habits from life.  He pulls it out from his pocket like me.  It’s fun. It’s like I went for a walk and fell into my dreams.

[ME]

[REAL ME]

[ DiscoFish ]

 

Only a little more than an hour before the end of LD. The game as a whole was ready, but there was a very important part – the music. This is the basis of my game. And if I had not had time to make music, then I would not have made the game. Just would not make sense to load the game on LD without music.

 

And luckily I was able to do everything! Yes, I wanted to make more sounds and music, but the time is not left.
All in the game musical compositions 8, 4 individual sounds, 11 phrases (when something cosmic talking with us.)

 

The game turned out not as what was supposed to be, but it was a great experience for me. And it was fun. I love LD.

I will try to write a few more facts about the development (of course if you are interested).

And yes, my English is very bad, sorry for that.
Thank you!

[ PLAY AND RATE MY TENTH ADVETRURE ]

Time Surge!

Posted by (twitter: @Dahold)
Tuesday, August 27th, 2013 3:23 pm

Project Link!

Made the Game Jam submission deadline with about 10 seconds to spare, then we all passed out. Post Mortem coming soon!


Credits:
Hitchh1k3r: Lead programmer
Naali: Director, assistant programmer, puzzle design
Solifuge: Art, game design, puzzle design
Tlynn: Writing, themeing, puzzle transcription
Willfor: Music

Special Thanks:
MysticStv, for puzzle transcription and snarky commentary
Mrs. Hik3r, for puzzle transcription and nap-enforcement
LWJGL, and Java in general. Thanks for being a thing!

Have you considered playing Lunar Rain?

Posted by (twitter: @leafthief)
Monday, April 29th, 2013 12:49 pm

card_title

Lunar Rain is a short Graphic Adventure set on the surface of the moon. Unfortunately the game is only available for Windows. It was made for the Compo in 48 hours with Adventure Game Studio

The player controls Rain, who has come to HPE Lunar Facility #26 in search for answers to many questions. Surrounded by a great vacuum her only companion is an AI. It helps her get through the days under a black sky, and the nights under thousand silent eyes.
Two months into her endeavor a call from Earth…

I would appreciate if you took the time to play and comment on it, it’s really short. I would especially be interested in whether Rain and the setting are something you’d like to see more of. I’m excited for the character and the setting but since my time is limited I’d like to find out whether people would play it.

avatar_intro

Be sure to check the game’s page in the next few days as I am trying to put together a timelapse as well as a gameplay video.

LeafThief

Ping – Game Complete!

Posted by
Sunday, April 28th, 2013 1:05 pm

Ping

PlaySourceAtariAge – Game Page
Note: Requires an emulator like Stella to play on computers.

About

For a small bat like Ping, the world is a big, dangerous place. Will little Ping make it in her new home?

Instructions

Move using joystick (arrow keys or mouse with Stella), ping using echolocation with joystick fire (spacebar or left mouse click in Stella).

Pinging costs 25 points. You gain points by making progress to the right and by eating bugs. Try to ping as few times as possible to maximize your score.

Avoid owls and walls, eat bugs, and get as far as you can!

Special

Supports AtariVox high score saving. Requires an AtariVox/SaveKey module to be plugged in to controller port 2 (or emulated in Stella).

Clear your AtariVox high score for Ping with select + joystick fire while in game.

Mute the pinging sound by setting Color/BW to BW (F4 in Stella).

Have fun!

My first Ludum Dare!

Posted by (twitter: @fullmontis)
Thursday, April 25th, 2013 3:28 pm

I’m in! First ludum dare and first attempt at completing a game ever! Wow, that sounds scary. Hopefully this will be a learning experience even if I miserably fail in delivering my game.

Since a lot of people have been listing their tools for the job, I guess I’ll do the same.

  • Genre: Point and click adventure
    I had been planning to make a free point and click adventure for a while now, so I thought that making a ludum dare entry may be some good training wheels before throwing myself into my “dream project”.  The fun thing about this genre is that it can fit any theme pretty easily.
  • Language: Python
  • Engine: Ren’py
    I’ve rarely seen Ren’py being used in ludum dares and never for anything other than visual novels, and that’s a serious pity. Yes, it is an engine for visual novels, something that actually made me ignore the engine for a long time  (stupid, stupid!). But the reality is its scripting language is so fast to use and flexible you can do some rather complex stuff with it.
    Okay, it’s pretty limited: for example, only 2D (no 3D models), and is not ideal for stuff that requires real time input, like a platformer (using plain pygame is better for that). But if you want to make something story driven that requires user input once in a while (a point and click game, for example), its scripting language is pretty powerful. It’s a pity everyone uses it mostly for visual novels and dating sims cause there is a lot of stuff that could be done with it. I’ve done a prototype of a first person point and click game in a matter of  minutes, no joke.
    Fast prototyping, fast debugging and on the fly script reloading means an immense amount  of time saved that can be used to add more mechanics or make better art and music. Since I know that I will be using (wasting) most of my time to come up with an interesting idea, time efficiency is a critical factor. Plus, it’s multiplat AND free. 
  • Editor: Notepad++
  • Graphics: Paint.NET, GIMP, probably some handdrawn or rotoscoped stuff.
  • Audio: REAPER combined with the free and excellent sounding Synth1

Good luck to everyone and good work!

CRA Auditor Released

Sunday, February 3rd, 2013 9:00 pm

My entry for the CRAJam has been released. the entry page is http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/cra-jam/?action=preview&uid=15656 . The game has you playing an auditor who has to decide the fate of the people you audit. There are three different endings to the game based on your performance. I still have sound to add to the game so might slip in an update on monday or tuesday.

SS_Audit

First zone almost completed

Posted by (twitter: @juaxix)
Monday, October 15th, 2012 12:43 pm

New monster and zone almost done!
Check out the video:

I’ve been working with physics and lighting.
I had some problems to optimize the entire theme of light and shadow with the mobile hardware, because some older devices do not support anything but OpenGL1.1 and the ones supporting OpenGL2 only have two lights (hardware acceleration) dynamics, and are directional.
I also had a hard time trying to coordinate all the events of the generation systems and balance enemy load, these are synchronized via environment variables with the AI, once you load the level you meet certain standards for each part phase, it run macros that direct action through the gaming experience.

I made ​​several models in 3DStudio and Maya, textures with Photoshop and it has been more difficult than I thought, but also a lot of fun :)

I’m making a summary of what I’ve done since the last update:
– Added a compass (triangle in front of the avatar) to know where to go next
– Creation of optimized materials compatible with light and shadow
– Creating a new enemy: mini skeleton, with its animations, etc..
– Creation of a series of doors with different animations, particle systems and so on, that are synchronized to provide a consistent flow to the game
– Including transients and environmental sound effects are played according to a given priority
– resource optimization: its a need to use the least number of objects in memory and AI’s possible, it’s an art to know how to do this and mantain the FPS high, almost between 40-60+

In six days I have to submit the game to the markets.
And it is working in Blackberry PlayBook, iPhone4+, iPad (1,2,3), Pc (win,linux,mac), etc

Enemy AI and user interface

Posted by (twitter: @juaxix)
Thursday, October 4th, 2012 4:08 pm

Here is the video from these days progress:

Now I could export the game to iOS 6.0. It works with iPad3 and iPhone5!
Bad news are that the game in iPod/iPhone 3G will not be available and in iPhone 3GS too slow…
I’m trying to make this better. Here is the discussion in our engine forum:
http://www.stonetrip.com/developer/forum/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=26748

Egypt hack and slash video progress

Posted by (twitter: @juaxix)
Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012 12:29 am

I have made this video:


EHS 4 October

to show the current progress of the game in about 2 weeks.

Player has animations, touch control pad,physics,low poly geometry, etc

The first level consists in 2 rooms and a mage tower, all the game is related to magic and mages!, i am a bit worried about fps, with 5-7k polys for each part of the full scene (rooms and tower), 4 particle systems of 16 elements each one, collisions, object occlussion, physics, AI, animations (no lights , no shadows), the game is running at 40-50fps…
I am wondering if I would need to reduce the meshes again! Or remove particles, occlussion ,etc, so I can add bloom fx, lights and more action to improve gameplay and game itself: graphics, sounds, music, attack,fx,etc

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