Posts Tagged ‘35’

LD36 wallpaper

Posted by
Monday, August 22nd, 2016 12:41 pm

ld36

For anyone using a 329×277 monitor, I made you a wallpaper! You can use it for a little while but remember to credit me!! (If you can’t see the image then someone must have stolen it…)

In the above wallpaper, you see a glimpse of the number line. A number line is a complicated mathematical concept meaning a line of numbers. The wallpaper only features a short bit though, because people have come up with quite many other numbers too (for example, 1, 7264, 25, -1, and goooooooooooogle).

36 is one of the tourist attractions on our sight-seeing trip through the number line. It’s both a square number, a triangular number, and a circular number at the same time. If you have a room consisting of exactly one of them, the sum of the room’s elements is 36 – although no formal proof of this has ever been written.

But if you have two of them chilling out in the same room, their sum is 72, the amount of hours in the LD jam. Coincidentally, 72 divided by two is 36, which has piqued the interest of the international community of angry bloggers seeing a conspiracy everywhere.

Now, if these two 36s couldn’t find a way out of the room, one could insert the other into a phone number to make an international direct-dialphone call to Hungary with the code +36. They could then call Englkyklös “Glxblt” Vasarnàpzsczitzocwek (no relation to the popular car salesman) to ask him about his opinion on the Māori legend about the creation of mankind where 36 gods assembled the various parts of the first human.

Good old Englkyklös would answer in his usual wisdom, paraphrasing a carefully selected contemplative Zen koan: “Would you fucking stop it with these prank calls already? This is the 36th time.”

Meanwhile somewhere else, but still on Earth, a scientist (age 36) returns to his laboratory, deep in the basement of a lucratively funded research complex. He meets with an army major with 36 medals, and they both turn their keys in two 36 secure locks at the same time, opening massive blast doors. The scientist then carries on, putting on equipment he got for free from the Australian basketball team, The Adelaide 36ers.

It’s not protective equipment or anything, he’s just a fan of the team.

The scientist then carries a piece of krypton from the hazardous materials storage using a 36-inch pipe wrench (known colloquially in the American oilfield business as “a 36” – and in Europe as “a 91.44”).

He carefully places the piece on a desk, rips off the warning labels about krypton exposure from the 36 kilograms of explosives someone’s left lying around again, takes out an electron microscope, and zooms in as close as he can get.

Okay, this is weird– Whoops, the microscope was nowhere close to the piece. Hehe, I guess accidents happen even to professionals! The scientist reminisces about the time he lucked out a perfect score of 36 on the ACT tests by just answering questions randomly, and concludes total chaos is the foundation of good science.

After watching 36 videos from the weird part of Youtube to procrastinate, he then adjusts the position of the microscope 36 times before getting it right.

Finally, the results are conclusive: the atomic number of krypton is still 36 today.

But after all this, where does the concept of Love come in? What’s so special about Niels Bohr anyway? And who the hell ordered 36 extra large pizzas to my address? I’m not gonna pay for these, that’s for sure.

Find out, or don’t, AND MORE, as Jwatt does Ludum Dare 36.

 

RobotJet gameplay video and POST MORTEM

Posted by (twitter: @@janikve)
Thursday, May 5th, 2016 6:00 pm

Hi all,

I made a gameplay video of my game RobotJet for this ludum dare.

The video has different levels than the ludum dare submition and I also added two sound effects. However the game mechanic is same so if you haven’t played it yet, you can do so at http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-35/?action=preview&uid=55647.

Also please leave a comment if you have some suggestion because I plan to finish this game and release it for iPads because recently i found out that love2d already supports iOS development.

POST MORTEM:

I think everything worked as I expected. I had this game idea for a week or so before the competition already in mind. I wanted to implement controlling player by modifying the enviroment instead of using the direct controls.

First idea was to move a ball from left to right side of the screen by creating hills and valleys using physics. I didn’t manage to draw the controls for this game on the paper so I went for a simpler solution using the grid. Somewhere in this point a simpler idea of using gravity and collecting something instead of moving from left to right emerged. This led to the robot collecting batteries with a puzzle-like levels using gravity controls and walls to navigate robot through the level. Only problem with puzzle-like game is that creating puzzles takes much time. I wasn’t sure if I would be able to prepare good set of levels but I wanted to try the idea.

Because i was not able to do actual programming until the second half of the second day of the jam due to logistics, I had a plenty of time to come up with a concrete idea and solve almost all the problems. So when I started to program I had a pretty good idea of the game mechanic and what I had to do.

Programming phase was pretty straightforward. I wanted to use Love2D because it is supereasy for prototyping even if I hadn’t much experience with it. I had some experience with lua programming from Codea app from iPad and my previous ludum dare entry. I also did a simple pong game one week before ludum dare as a training :-)

After half day of programming I had the game ready and basic graphics in place. After few hours of sleep I had to go to work on monday and I could show my game to my coleagues(sorry boss :-)). They liked the idea but didn’t like the graphic and there were no levels. Actual player didn’t even look like a robot but more like a ghost back then :-)

After work I rushed home to finish some graphics – draw the robot and create tutorial levels. Luckily I remembered the wonderful Tiled map editor which helped a lot with level creation and it exports directly to a Lua so I saved some time by not implementing any tools.

Anyway I knew I couldn’t make good enough levels because I was still exploring what robot can do. I spent a lot of time putting obstacles in front of the robot and watching its behavior because sometimes I was suprised what can be done using such simple game mechanic (it still surprises me because today i found a simpler solution to one of new levels presented in the gameplay video).

When the time was dangerously passing by, I finished fooling around with the robot and went back to doing actual work. I polished graphic – as I am not any sort of good painter I did my best using piskel app as pixel graphic editor for robot and tiles. Also at this point I found out that I can do a tutorial by drawing directly in the level and showing the gameplay features one by one. I don’t know if this is good or understandable, please let me know in the comments if you find tutorial good!

I showed the game to my brother and he created three of the campaign levels. I had to polish them a little bit afterwards because one of the was not passable and other were easy to get stuck. I wanted that robot won’t get stuck without the possibility to unstuck (Robot cannot react to the modifications to the field has is alread standing at – for example if in the hole where he cannot go left nor right he won’t shapeshift to go up if shapeshift controller placed over the robot).

I though that player should not die/stuck during the game to not feel bad about his skill and won’t get frustrated from starting over so every situation must be resolvable.

Afterwards the time was almost up so I packaged the game and submitted.

Next day I fixed some bug that prevent last level from being finished – spawn point. This was clearly caused because I haven’t had enough time to replay every level after every change.

For the future I plan to create a proper set of levels to illustrate all things that can be done programming the robot using just gravity and walls. All levels I am creating now are resolvable by putting the controls in place before the level starts so instead of rushing during level player can solve the puzzle by thinking before the level starts and preparing the setup for the robot beforehand.

This ludum was enjoyable as always but after this one I feel a little bit special because I really like the resulting game (even bad graphics and no sound and almost no levels 😀 ) mainly because of possibilities it presents.

Regards everybody and see you in the next ludum dare,

Jan

Slimon Sways playthrough video

Posted by
Sunday, May 1st, 2016 9:06 am

Far later than usual, but yeah D:

Play it here:
http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-35/?action=preview&uid=39646

Found it!

Friday, April 22nd, 2016 5:58 am

foundit

You can play it here!

Have you found yours?

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