Archive for the ‘LD #31’ Category

Hey guys,

although we haven’t been able to participate in Ludum Dare this time we still would like to show you our last game, which would have been quite fitting for this theme…you are a bunny defending a giant carrot and killing mutants with, well, CARROTS! 😀 We have been working on our last LD31 Jam entry “Of Carrots And Blood” and we have released it on itch.io for free for Windows and Mac and it is also coming out on Desura soon. We have added powerups, different enemy types, a global highscore for the single player and we have also added a local 2 player Co-op mode (which is the most fun) with a big boss fight surprise in the end! So please check it out :)

 

Download OF CARROTS AND BLOOD on itch.io here!

Of Carrots And Blood

 

 

OCAB screenshot #01

OCAB Kissing bunnies

 

And for those of you who already know the Jam version, it would be really cool, if you could compare the two versions and tell us here in the comments, if we applied your feedback for the better or worse 😉 More feedback much appreciated!

 

Download OF CARROTS AND BLOOD on itch.io here!

Of Carrots And Blood

 

Thanks, have fun playing :)

Chris and Sebastian

Very hot place – Post mortem

Posted by (twitter: @edve98)
Monday, April 20th, 2015 2:35 pm

My second LD compo post-mortem!

note: LD in Lithuania starts at 4am

Day 1: I’ve started to think about my game as soon as I get up (about 7 am). Unfortunately, I was not able to start developing my game till 1 pm. From then, till 2am in the evening I made most of my game features, and half of the art

Day 2: I got up at 10am, and I knew that today I had to fix a lot of bugs that I found (UI wasn’t working at all).  Somewhere about 6pm I had almost everything set up for deployment, so I went and drew extra sprites, made everything a lot more pretty. At 1:30am in the evening, I *remembered* that I do not have a sprite for player and no music/sounds at all.  Unfortunately, somehow half of the stuff broke, so it was very tense 2 and a half ours before the deadline. I finished UI at 3:59am, and that was it. Still did not have player sprite, but I didn’t want to cheat, so I used deployment(or how is it called?) hour to submit my game.

 

What went well:

I did make my game prettier than the last one, just as planned

I finished most of the features I wanted

What didn’t:

I didn’t had enough time to add player sprite and UI was still bit lame

All in all, this was really great LD for me, I did much better than the last

Check out my LD game(s?) here:

LD32 compo “Very hot place” : http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-32/?action=preview&uid=45010

LD31 compo “Hot place” : http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-31/?action=preview&uid=45010

Submitted my 2nd LD game!

Posted by (twitter: @edve98)
Sunday, April 19th, 2015 8:56 pm

Thumb

 

 

 

 

This time I was focusing a lot more on graphics. Did I succeeded? Check out both games (if you can)!

my 1st LD compo game, Hot Place : http://gamejolt.com/games/action/hot-place/41208/

my 2nd LD compo game, Very Hot Place: http://gamejolt.com/games/platformer/very-hot-place/61437/

 

Anyway, I finished working on my game when it was 1 and a half minutes left till the submission hour 😛

Aaaand it’s almost 5am in Lithuania. Good night!

Killing mutants with carrots + kissing + boss fight! LD31 postmortem

Posted by (twitter: @TriteGames)
Saturday, April 18th, 2015 9:02 am

Hey guys,

although we are not able to participate in Ludum Dare this time we still would like to show you our last game, which is quite fitting for this theme…you are a bunny defending a giant carrot and killing mutants with, well, CARROTS! 😀 We have been working on our last LD31 Jam entry “Of Carrots And Blood” and we just released it on itch.io for free for Windows and Mac. We have added powerups, different enemy types, a global highscore for the single player and we have also added a local 2 player Co-op mode (which is the most fun) with a big boss fight surprise in the end! So please check it out :)

 

Download OF CARROTS AND BLOOD on itch.io here!

 

 

OCAB screenshot #01

OCAB Kissing bunnies

 

And for those of you who already know the Jam version, it would be really cool, if you could compare the two versions and tell us here in the comments, if we applied your feedback for the better or worse 😉 More feedback much appreciated!

 

Download OF CARROTS AND BLOOD on itch.io here!

 

Thanks, have fun playing and happy jamming :)

Chris and Sebastian

6 AM. Time to get to work!

Posted by (twitter: @Martinoinez)
Friday, April 17th, 2015 11:14 pm

Alright.

During all the previous Ludum Dares I’ve participated in, I’ve woken up and checked the theme, and gotten disappointed. There’s never been the theme I was hoping for. But this time, I’m really exited about the theme!

Let’s get to work!

Tip Exchange

Posted by
Friday, April 17th, 2015 7:53 pm

Ludum dare is coming up in just 15 minutes so every one should be getting ready. I set up a tip exchange in the comments of this post where you can share your tips and tricks that you use in ludum dare! You can also post questions about making your game or how to do certain things in the comments.

Good luck to everyone competing i hope you all do well!

LD31 The Legend of Adlez: Knil’s Adventure v0.8

Posted by (twitter: @ripattisoftware)
Monday, April 13th, 2015 10:22 pm

Hi there!

I released v0.8 of my game which prototype was made for LD31.

It’s still far from finished state, but I just want to post info about it before LD32.

The Legend of Adlez: Knil’s Adventure is small Zelda clone, entire game is on one screen.

s2 s3 s4

What I’ve made in v0.8:
– All 3 temples and all core questchains
– Combat system, a lot of monsters
– Saving the game
– Smooth fading of the screen, a few effects
– Fog of the war, now you cannot see unexplored areas
– Added Music. It’s ripped from anime OSTs of *monigatari and No Game No Life
– More funny dialogues
– A lot of bugfixes

Download and play here

Hey there!

From the creators of Ludum Dare 31’s Disco Kitty Nightmare comes a new mobile arcade game called Cubes!

It’s free and you can get it now on the play store.  Just follow the link below and start playin!

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ArchiveStudios.Cubes&hl=en

Please don’t forget to leave us a review! :)

 

Kissing bunnies and bloody mutants! LD31 Postmortem :)

Posted by (twitter: @TriteGames)
Sunday, April 12th, 2015 4:31 pm

Hey guys,

we most likely won’t be able to participate in Ludum Dare this time :( BUT we have been working on our last LD31 Jam entry Of Carrots And Blood and we just released it on itch.io for free for Windows and Mac. We have added powerups, different enemy types, a global highscore for the single player and we have also added a local Co-op mode (which is the most fun) with a big surprise in the end! So please check it out :)

 

Download OF CARROTS AND BLOOD on itch.io here!

 

 

OCAB screenshot #01

OCAB Kissing bunnies

 

And for those of you who already know the Jam version, it would be really cool, if you could compare the two versions and tell us here in the comments, if we applied your feedback for the better or worse 😉 More feedback much appreciated!

 

Download OF CARROTS AND BLOOD on itch.io here!

 

Thanks and have fun playing,

Chris and Sebastian

How to make sure a game idea is good?

Posted by (twitter: @strong99)
Sunday, March 22nd, 2015 7:20 am

You finally came up with the game of your dreams. You wrote everything down, used all available studies and it sounds too good to be true on paper. But how do you make sure it ends up being fun to play? You could build the game and throw in endless testing afterwards until your test subjects think it’s fun. But is that really the way to go? I think not. There are better ways to do quality checks. So what easier and quicker ways are there?

Periodic player involvement

Don’t shy away from asking potential players to try and review your game concept. Besides the obvious part where they give feedback on what they like or dislike, they are also the first to try the game itself when it’s finished. If you gain their interest the chances are they will be the first group to spread the word. Not to mention they feel a part of the game since they were involved. It’s a good way for a small indie developer to get some attention. But let’s get back to the obvious part. If you think developing your game takes around 5 months. Make sure to involve your future players at least once a month. It gives you time to act on their fears and comments. Later on this will lower the time taken during testing.

Prototype, prototype and implement

I learned that creating your game at once with all features feels good, but it gave a headache to test it with my audience. Instead, I tend to build smart prototypes in the GameCreator with the most important game features. When I’m making a platform game with a special boss I take the bosses mechanics and put it in a small level which I can easily fine-tune. It’s quicker and easier to get done for your next session with players. Nothing beats seeing your involved audience smile for five minutes rather than get stuck on issues you didn’t want them to comment on.

 

Analytics

To further know if your game will be a success, write down which statistics to record and how you expect them to analyse. Letting players test your game is one. But how do you record the necessary information you need to know the players act as you wish? Is watching enough? Do you need to record the screen and eye moments? Before I get to play-tests I write a simple table with bullet points I need to know in Excel. It often contains: time needed to finish a level/section, amount of retries, keys being pressed, the player’s emotion and their average compared with all others.

Use structured tables to keep your data at hand

This is just a small set of techniques I use and have seen in other companies. They give you the edge and act as a forward warning system when users freak out about your concept. Large game development companies even have their own departments with data analytics who analyse every pixel of a game during game-play.

How do you make sure your users enjoy? Did you ever use play tests? Or are you planning to? I would love to know!

View all blogs from the series “What makes a good game?”

Where’d the Time Go?

Posted by (twitter: @timbeaudet)
Monday, March 16th, 2015 2:19 pm

precise_shot_title

Ludum Dare 31 was an awesome event for me, the Precise Shot compo entry came out great!  Not only did the game come out great, by running the RescueTime application, I was able to breakdown how much time went into development.  The reports clearly show what went well and what could be done better for Ludum Dare 32 and beyond.

  • Sleeping was the single most time consuming activity: 15 hours 29 minutes.
  • Most comfortable with programming, and it shows taking more than 50% development time.
    • Future events I should aim to spread this time on content creation, arts and sounds.
  • Six hours of development efforts on the second day didn’t make it into the final game.
  • 76 minutes spent on twitter, composing 41 tweets.
  • The final hour was spent on the art, sounds and counting effects for the results screen.

Check out the results in more detail below: (click the image to make it larger)

precise_shot_time_graphic

I do work at RescueTime but I know there will be people interested in the data above, and maybe some will be interested in using RescueTime to learn about their own productivity and habits.  You can sign up for an account at: https://www.rescuetime.com/ or ask any questions you may have about it.

More post-mortem details about Precise Shot can be found here.

Which aspects are important in a game?

Posted by (twitter: @strong99)
Saturday, March 7th, 2015 9:00 am

Although there are millions of games these days, only a few really succeed and even less are worth to play. How is this possible? A game consists of a set of rules, right? But a bunch of rules don’t make it fun to play. Actually, far from in my opinion. Throwing in some random rules doesn’t make a game good. So, which aspects are important related to the rules and make it worth the play? What gives rules the edge to play a game again and again?

There are lots different theories about that. But let’s start analyzing it a bit on our own first.
Take FarmVille, already a much debate game reflecting micro economics and social play. While you’re forced to do social play and use the micro economics, most people keep returning as long as they can. Why do they get back? If you ask players what makes the game fun, you’ll receive several answers. I took the three most heard reasons to analyze:

  • It’s my farm
  • I keep finding new stuff
  • Crops harvesting before they wither

My farm in FarmVille

It’s my farm ‘cause I build it

What makes them think it’s their farm? Well, they have put time in it, they decorated the farm themselves by earning or buying options. It gives the player the idea it’s his own farm. He actually did create the farm based on the game’s rules. It’s like drawing a painting or building a house. You put effort in it to create it. It’s a strong drive for players to return. We can define this as “creativity” and “ownership”. Depending on the theories I know there are around 4 to 16 “drivers”.

The need of collecting

Will you keep finding new stuff? Yes, because there isn’t much stronger than the human’s curiosity. If it grabs hold of your attention. You want to know all of it. So that’s a very strong game driver. The drivers I normally define are: calling, creativity, curiosity, possession, social pressure, impatience, scarcity and accomplishments. If a game contains all of these, the theory is, it will be playable by most if not all people.

The need to avoid loss

In FarmVille you need to tend your crops like a baby? A very strong drive in this game to get back is to prevent your farm from dying. The last thing you want is to hinder the progress of building your farm by letting crops wither. This forces you to get back regularly. Yet, they don’t go as far as destroying the entire farm. The behavior is known as avoidance and creates a pressure driver.

I can analyze a game much further than this to find if the game is good. But luckily I don’t need to reinvent the wheel. There are already a lot of gamification and analyzing guidelines and frameworks you can grab. In the past I used the following frameworks: Octalysis, Marczeweski, GAME, RAMP and much more. They contain questions, constraints and rules. I often find these incomplete and I normally use a set of frameworks to get all drivers and aspects correctly.

Although a game implementing all these drivers has more change of succeeding, focusing on less drivers could also end up being a very popular game. But even in a first person shooter where the focus lies with the story and thrill for action it often also contains ownership and creativity. Weapons, different paths to solve the level and even scores are related to a driver. But they aren’t always very clear or even the focus of the game.

Although these frameworks can predict your game’s popularity and acceptance, I see them more as guidelines. I find it easier to set up a fun game and balance my game before development starts. It allows me to shift my attention to actually creating the game rather than endlessly include game testers and that makes it easier to compare it with your target audience’s profile.

This is my second of a series of blogs on “What makes a good game”.

You probably unconsciously use a lot of these aspects already. can you find them? How do you define your game’s aspects during Ludum Dare?

What exactly is a game?

Posted by (twitter: @strong99)
Saturday, February 28th, 2015 7:00 am

We all know games, everyone plays games, but do we really know what defines a game? Before we can create a good game we need some sort of definition of it. So what is it? Sure, everything with rules can be defined as a sort of game. But let’s define it a bit better than that. So let’s try!

What would be the most simplistic game you can think of? The first game that comes to my mind is the child’s game “Tagging”. It has two very basic rules: One player is “it” and if you’re being tagged by “it”, you become it. Remembering my years on the primary school’s playground the game had different additional rules all the time. An often used additional rule was “You can’t tag the old “it” back”. Although these were set by us, additional constants where there too. For example the teachers didn’t allow you to leave the playground or trip others. Not a rule set by us, the players, but by our superiors.

The summary of the game? There’s conflict, no-one wants to be “it”. It would be boring if someone wanted to be “it” because of the lack of conflict. The rules define boundaries in the game. The outcome of the game was clear too, the child being “it” at the moment of the school bell lost the game. Katie Salen, a veteran game developer, her description of a game comes to my mind:

“A game is a system in which players engage in an artificial conflict, defined by rules, that result in a quantifiable outcome” (Katie Salen, Game Design Fundamentals, page 80)

If I apply this logic to one of my previous Ludum Dare games, for example, “You only get one” we could describe it like this:

Conflict: the player wants to get home without being eaten while the dragon keeps advancing.

Rules: the player is constraint in a 2D world, there’s gravity, the game is lost when touching the dragon, his fire or falling out of the screen.

Outcome: the player wins when he enters his house (time constraint).

Ludum Dare 28 - The dragon's journey

That is quite clear, but how does this apply to popular games like Minecraft? Is it a real game? Let’s try:

Conflict: the player needs to stay alive (retain its hearts)

Rules: the player loses hearts when hungry, the player receives damage from mobs, the game is lost when its hearts are depleted, the player can eat food, can create weapons and armor etc.

Outcome: is there any? What about defeating the ender dragon?

Is the ender dragon really a quantifiable outcome? After defeating the dragon the conflict itself remains, nothing is resolved. The main conflict centers around staying alive, not on the dragon roaming a different realm. Thus, I wouldn’t describe it as an outcome or a game, but more of a sandbox or toy. Though open world games like Oblivion feature some kind of the same freedom as Minecraft, in the end you resolve the main conflict, defeat the bad guy and establishes peace. That’s a clear quantifiable outcome with rules and conflicts.

This is my first of a series of blogs on “What makes a good game”.

What’s your take on the definition? Does it fit mine?

I’m in, LD32

Posted by (twitter: @strong99)
Wednesday, February 25th, 2015 2:07 pm

I know, it’s a bit early. But I’m already preparing for the upcoming Ludum Dare competition. Like previous years I’ll be competing in the April Ludum Dare. This will be my ninth time in the 4 years I compete.

To get myself prepared I’ll be doing a series of research on “What makes a game good?”. From experience I know there’s a list of do’s and don’ts. I’ll be keeping a blog on this here on the Ludum Dare website and my own blog. Up to the event I’ll be posting eight blogs, followed by reviews on how my blogs fit with games made by you. Feel free to request or comment. And if you’re in for a review on your entry about “What made your game good?” Leave a message!

Previous blog

Current blog

For the upcoming series and Ludum Dare I prepared my normal toolset including:

And lastly

  • Tape, lots of paper and a pen

Post LD 31 – Azor Soundtrack

Posted by (twitter: @XxDarkmaidenzxX)
Monday, February 9th, 2015 4:22 am

Making the soundtrack for the final version of  “AZOR”

 

After the awesome LD 31, I just released another track from Azor that could be used for the official release of the game. Check it out!

 

“A colourful journey into the deep of your soul.

It’s like an eternal spring.”

심장 멀리
필요 닿다,
영 원한 봄

Glow Drop (LD31) has now levelled up to Glow Drop DX!

Posted by (twitter: @gamepopper)
Friday, January 30th, 2015 7:31 am

 

If you have an Android or a Windows 8.1 PC, you can now play the updated Glow Drop DX, with more power ups and stuff!

The original Glow Drop will remain on GameJolt as well as here, as it was made as a game jam submission and should remain here in its original glory, but if you want to try a bigger challenge on the go, then you should get Glow Drop DX.

New things in this version include:

  • Updated Music
  • Three new power ups
  • New Drop Shapes

I’m also planning on doing a Windows Phone 8.1 build as well, so keep an eye out for them.

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