About TobiasW (twitter: @tolicious)

Hey there! I'm a computer science student from Germany, and as you've probably guessed by now, I make games. I also co-organize a monthly game jam in Berlin.

My games: http://blog.dragonlab.de

Also I'll love you FOREVER* if you try out the game I'm currently working on and leave a bit of feedback! (It has a Unity Web Player build and desktop versions for Windows, Mac and Linux.)

*) might be exaggerated

Entries

TobiasW's Trophies

you SURVIVED Helevenium #LD29
Awarded by alvivar
on May 19, 2014
Quality commenter (QUALITY ALERT, MAKE WAY)
Awarded by Jwatt
on December 12, 2013
The Longest Comment on my Game Award
Awarded by Teejay5
on September 17, 2013

TobiasW's Archive

LudumDare++

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Friday, April 17th, 2015 4:02 pm

I’m in! And I might actually try something new this time: I’m usually using Unity3D/C#, and this time I’m thinking of using JavaScript/Phaser. Not that I’ve ever done that before, but where would be the fun in that? It’s gonna be an adventure! Also:

Sigrun displays

As Sigrun puts it here, I’m sure using JavaScript for the first time in the LD compo will be fiiiiiine.

Anyway, here are my tools:

  • Language/Engine: Either C#/Unity3D (if I get a big idea) or JavaScript/Phaser (if I have a smaller idea)
  • Art: I might use RageSpline and glow effects, or stylized filtering, or fun ANSII symbols ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ, or SVG art – or, well, crude handdrawn images made with my trusty Wacom Bamboo. (Damn, it’s been foreeever since I did that.)
  • Sfx: My mouth + a microphone + Audacity. Maybe bfxr or jfxr.
  • Music: Abundant Music for generation – and for MIDI rendering either GXSCC (chiptunes-like) or SynthFont (“normal” instruments)
  • Goals: High innovation and/or fun!
  • Motivation: HELL YES!

So you think the theme is awful?

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Saturday, December 6th, 2014 6:46 am
Do you feel like doing this?

Do you feel like doing this?

Is it not even a real theme to you, just a technical restriction? Does it not inspire you even one tiny bit?

That’s fine.

Yeah, I just said that. It’s fine! Because I am sure there is another theme you really liked in the last voting round. No, don’t tell me, I want to be surprised later – just think of it really, really hard.

  • Artificial Life
  • After the End
  • Death is Useful
  • One Rule
  • Generation
  • Avoid the Light
  • Deep Space
  • You Are Not Supposed To Be Here
  • Everything Falls Apart
  • End Where You Started
  • Isolation
  • Machines
  • You Can’t Stop
  • Color is Everything
  • Playing Both Sides
  • Borders
  • Chaos
  • Deja vu

You’re thinking of it? Great! I hereby invite you to take this favourite theme of yours and brainstorm with THAT as the core instead of “Entire Game on One Screen”.

So, what about the actual theme, you might ask? Just use it as what it is: A technical restriction. You can be inspired by whatever theme you want to, as long as “Entire Game on One Screen” still applies.

Good luck with your new shiny theme!

And the theme is…

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Friday, December 5th, 2014 7:51 pm
"Entire Game on One Screen"? Really? Man.

“Entire Game on One Screen”? Really?

 

…but seriously, the theme is making my head hurt with all its limiting vagueness. No switching scenes, sure. No scrolling allowed, I guess? What about zooming? Or is “one screen” about having a single camera perspective? Can elements come in from the side? Can elements appear at all? And uh, if they can appear and vanish to/from the sides, isn’t that like scrolling again?

PS: If you answer something like “It’s totally up for you to interpret”, just pretend the GIF above is about reading your comment.

>y! So much y!

Yup, I’m in again! Same tools as last time – and the same base code as every time, though I might also use some of the more generic netcode of my previous LD game.

Tools:

  • Engine: Unity3D
  • Art: I might use RageSpline and glow effects, or stylized filtering, or fun ANSII symbols ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ (that has never been more appropriate then now, I guess) – or, well, crude handdrawn images made with my trusty Wacom Bamboo. (Damn, it’s been foreeever since I did that.)
  • Sfx: My mouth + a microphone + Audacity. Maybe bfxr or jfxr.
  • Music: Abundant Music for generation – and for MIDI rendering either GXSCC (chiptunes-like) or SynthFont (“normal” instruments)
  • Goals: High innovation and/or fun!
  • Motivation: HELL YES!

SnakeFormer: Half Snake, Half Platformer! (Post Ludum Dare Compo Edition)

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Sunday, October 26th, 2014 11:52 am

A few months ago, I made my first puzzle game ever for Ludum Dare 29. It was well received (#16 in Innovation!) and players called it “clever” and “challenging”, but the difficulty curve was too steep. Now, I finally found the time to make a post-compo edition with more and easier tutorial levels to ease the beginning and a really hard one where you can test your mettle! I humbly present:

Banner

Snake meets platformer physics!

A short puzzle game combining two
well-known concepts to form a unique hybrid.

Play right here in your browser!
(And maybe rate it! Or share it with friends who might like it.)

Download for Windows, OS/X or Linux!

“But,” you might say, “only 9 levels?” Yeah, for now. I think it’s enough to demonstrate the concept well and especially the later levels might take some time to solve. I’m pondering releasing it on Android soon, and maybe, just maybe, I’ll search for a level designer and get more levels made. If you like it and want more of it, please leave a comment!

Credits:

Screenshots:

 

…but first invite a friend or two. It’s dangerous to go alone!

The rating period is slowly but surely nearing its end, and I thought it cannot hurt to write a postmortem for the game I made three weeks ago. I wish I would’ve promoted the game more (it’s my first online multiplayer game after all!) and I wish I could’ve played more games, but my master’s thesis was jealous and demanded I spent more time with it. That being said, I have a free minute now, so here goes nothing!

Design

Three weeks ago, when I was still young and inexperienced, I thought that “Connected Worlds” lends itselfs perfectly well to making an online multiplayer game. (Nevermind that I never did one before, haha.) That being said, there are some obvious design problems that I needed to solve – and that ultimatly led to the current design:

  • LD rating is 3 weeks, and people likely won’t play all at once. To tackle that, the game should a) be able to be finished single-player too.
  • Even if people are online at the same time, they probably won’t arrive at the same time – and likely don’t want to wait either. For that reason, I made the game drop-in/drop-out: The first player to join starts a new session that ends when the last player leaves or the game is won/lost. Any player that arrives in the meantime just spawns next to the torch. (I briefly entertained the idea of one permanent session, but I wouldn’t want to do the level design for THAT, phew. Also I highly doubted that players would come back often enough for that to be interesting.)
  • Synchronisation is hard. So, uh, nothing twitchy. More slowly. With tiles to walk on.
  • Synchronisation might not work correctly. I have no idea what I’m doing after all. So, better do a co-op game and nobody gets pissed that the enemy had an advantage.

Okay, so a scalable drop-in/drop-out co-op online multiplayer game. This is basically what I spent my complete first day on, and I had no idea what I actually wanted to do gameplay-wise yet. I implemented a chat though: Just text that appears on top of player’s heads.

After a good night’s sleep, I arrived at the idea spawning from the Olypmic torch relay: A flame had to be transported from A to B – in this case between two kingsdoms. Slowly everything clicked together: It was dark, hence the flame is important. If you drop it, it’s not protected anymore and slowly dies down, and you have to drop it sometimes because it’s heavy as hell. And there are multiple obstacles that you have to dig through or build across. You can do it alone if you react fast, but it’s stressful always to drop the flame, dig/build a little, pick it up again, transport it, drop it etc. – it’s much better with friends helping you! So yeah, here we go – a game that you can play alone or with “any” number of friends.

Implementation

The game is made in Unity and with the SDK from (and hosted by) Yahoo Game Networks. Free hosting for up to 5000 daily users? Yes please.

There is a server, but it doesn’t do much – it mainly keeps track of the users, items on the floor and already dug-out rocks so that it can inform new players. It also distributes events. The only thing that it is really authorative about is when an item is spawned, picked up or dropped to avoid item duplication.

On the client side, you are the only player that moves directly – and you send messages to the server how you move. Because movement is between tiles, those messages are few, and they will arrive in roughly the same interval in which they are send, so on the other screens you move the same way, just with a delay. Each player object has an event queue – move, dig, build bridge etc – that will be executed in that order with the appropriate delays, so it’s no problem if messages arrive to quickly either.

Making the server mostly non-authorative and using that message queue system is what helped me be able to finish the game in such a short time, I think.

What didn’t go so well?

  • No sound effects. I wish I had some, but I finished the level itself in last second, and well – that was a bit more important, I guess.
  • Nobody invites their friends to play. I wish I knew why. It’s super easy – just share a link – but many people commented that they had to play alone. I suppose they do have friends, right? Maybe even game developer friends?

Apart from that, I’m actually largely content! Sure, there’s not that much gameplay, but it’s fun – and sure, the graphics could be better, but hey! 48 hours and first time online multiplayer! I’m certainly not complaining. Which leads me to…

What went well?

  • Online Multiplayer in 48 hours, that’s what!
  • The whole thing is surpringly stable, if sometimes a little laggy. I would’ve expected to have more problems with an online multiplayer game.
  • Development wasn’t as hard as expected. I was always a bit wary of networked multiplayer in any form, but it turns out that it wasn’t that bad to always have a server and often two windows running. Might be because it was only 48 hours and a small-scoped project with no necessary security though.
  • The Drop-in/Drop-out is cool. And it also has the side effect of allowing people to spectate games. Apropos drop-in/drop-out…
  • The game is a lot of fun with streamers! Allowing for a variable number of players that can join anytime, and streamers having an audience already made for great fun a lot of time.
  • The chat is refreshingly different. Having text appear on top of the heads is cool, but seeing it being typed live is surprisingly even more fun!

Tips

  • Trust in the process. Seriously, don’t worry if your design is not complete yet. I didn’t have any core gameplay ideas until 12 hours before the end and I still finished with something. Just work towards that goal until then.
  • Keep a ToDo list. Workflowy is superb for that. Helps me stay on course and motivated.
  • Keep your design simple and modular. Especially if you do something big technology-wise that you haven’t attempted before. If you finish early, you can still add more features! I would’ve loved to have enemies and defending each other, or wind zones where you have to keep the flame safe, and… but time ran out, and the current state is very playable.
  • Test early. I started testing long before I had actual gameplay. I guess networked games are special in that regard though.

In Conclusion…

…I’m quite happy with the result, and I’m seriously considering doing a game with online components for next LD too. So much inspiring online stuff this LD, damn! And maybe I’ll even get a chance to gather more networked multiplayer experience by then, but knowing me, I won’t and I’ll just dive right in. Wouldn’t have it any other way, really.

Do you have any questions? Feel free to ask them in the comments or on Twitter!

And maybe you have a free minute or two and want to try my game? (And maybe ask a friend to join you! Friends are pretty cool.)

Thanks for reading! I’m done here, goodbye.

*opens the LD blog*

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Friday, August 22nd, 2014 5:05 pm

Base code! Also: Good luck everybody!

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Friday, August 22nd, 2014 1:28 pm

I’m ready. Let’s do this.

Like every time, here is my base code: Prelude. (You’ll need RageSpline to use it completely.)

It does lots of cool stuff:

  • Unified button layout for XBox360 controllers on Windows (even with vibration there!) and Mac
  • Makes cool (optionally glowing) shapes (together with RageSpline)
  • Traversing spline paths (with RageSpline too)
  • Uses Scoreoid for a leaderboard
  • Basic text buttons and vanishing text for notifications
  • Easing
  • A few helpers for math, Unity and some general C# stuff

It’s a bit of a mess though. But hey, it’s mine. Good luck everybody!

I’m in! (╯°□°)╯︵sısǝɥʇ s,ɹǝʇsɐɯ

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Tuesday, August 5th, 2014 8:07 am

Me, working on my master’s thesis.

I don’t have time to do Ludum Dare, I have a master’s thesis to finish – but I’ve been checking this blog for the past weeks frequently. I think I’m addicted. Send help, please.

Until help arrives though, I have no choice but to participate in this LD too!

Tools:

  • Engine: Unity3D
  • Art: I might use RageSpline and glow effects, or stylized filtering, or fun ANSII symbols ᕕ( ᐛ )ᕗ – or, well, crude handdrawn images made with my trusty Wacom Bamboo. (Damn, it’s been foreeever since I did that.)
  • Sfx: My mouth + a microphone + Audacity. Maybe bfxr or jfxr.
  • Music: Abundant Music for generation – and for MIDI rendering either GXSCC (chiptunes-like) or SynthFont (“normal” instruments)
  • Goals: High innovation and/or fun!
  • Motivation: HELL YES!

Good luck everybody!

 

PS: I’m just kidding, my master’s thesis is going great, that’s why I got no reason to skip LD! 😀

Lessons learnt while making SnakeFormer

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Monday, May 19th, 2014 6:58 am

This Ludum Dare I made SnakeFormer, a short puzzle game combining Snake with pseudo-physics platformer mechanics.

Turns out that lava is pretty hot.

If you’d like to, you can play it here.

Like just about every game, some lessons were learnt, and I thought I’d write a small piece about them. It’s 12 hours before the judging ends, and nobody has time to read through a novel, so I’ll keep this short!


Game & Level Design

If a level has the right difficulty for you, it’ll be too hard for everybody else.
I swear I’ll remember this lesson one day, haha. That doesn’t necessarily mean “make it easier”, because in a level-based game, there is another approach:

When in doubt, make more levels.
Easier levels, preferably. I should’ve spent a lot less time on the menu and instead made more transition levels. Which brings me to:

Don’t introduce more than one mechanic per level.
Level 2 introduces: Lava, falling stones AND growing the snake. That’s, uh, a bit too much.

Even if you think the goal is clear, it might be not.
So – better make it clearer. The goal in my game is to exit the screen to the right, like in most platformers. Some people thought that they had to eat the whole level though, which is a more Snake-like goal.

Put instructions in the first level.
Some players don’t read the instructions before starting the game – but once they are confused inside the game, make it as easy as possible to re-read them.

Art, Sound & Music

Glow is freakin’ cool.
Seriously.

Homemade sound effects can be quite entertaining.
Any game needs sound effects, and since I’m no good at making them digitally, I tried to use my mouth for most. Turns out that’s a lot of fun to listen to, and I actually had a few people praise my sound design, especially the eating- and the end-of-level-sounds.

Abundant Music (music generator) + GXSCC (a MIDI chiptunes-like renderer) are the best team.
I’m no musician, so I had to use generated stuff. Those two are PERFECT. It still took very long to find songs that sound well together, but that definitly was time well spent.

Cheery music for hard and punishing gameplay.
Gnhihihihi. So much fun while watching streamers.

Process

Trust in the process and stay open for new ideas.
The concept I started out was a lot more boring, but then I asked myself “Okay, so those stones fall – what if gravity affects the snake too?” – and then SnakeFormer was born. So even if your initial idea isn’t perfect, go for it anyway instead of giving up, it might evolve into something great later on!

If your idea comes late, don’t worry! There’s still time!
I started development 12 hours after the start of the compo – 8 hours sleep, 4 hours pondering. Contrary to all expectations, I’m still alive and the game is playable.

ToDo lists are great to maintain focus.
Always use a ToDo list so you won’t lose track of your next tasks. Workflowy works best for me.

 


Thanks a lot for reading! I hope you enjoyed it as much as I enjoyed writing it.

Maybe I made you a bit curious about my game too? If you want to, you can play SnakeFormer here – and I don’t think I have to mention how much I like comments and ratings, do I?

I’m done here.

 

Is it already too late? Nope. Time for a Best Of!

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Friday, May 16th, 2014 6:57 pm

Woah! Look at all those games!

Hey folks! So, this time I’ve only rated 82 games. Shame on my, I know – I’m busy with my Master’s Thesis, but apart from that, I really have no excuses. I didn’t think I’d actually get around to do a Best Of list this time, but since those games are just so incredibly great I’ve done one anyway now!

So here’s a list of the best and/or most interesting games I’ve played – and so should you, in my opinion! But hey, I know it’s only three days left, so just pick the cherries. (Hint: They are all cherries.)

Excellence in EVERYTHING

Dig Hard by petey123567
Have you ever wanted to save the PRESIDENT from EARTH’S EVIL CORE and the UNDERGROUND DINOSAURS wielding BADASS WEAPONS? Sure you have! And even if not, this game will teach you why you SHOULD want that. It’s just so much fun even if when you inevitably die in mere seconds – and it feels more juicy than any fruit you’ll ever come across!

Planet Corp. by Maschinen-Mensch
Planet Corp is pretty short compared to the other games in this category, but what it does, it does really well. You are drilling different planets in our solar system for resources in a totally safe way (that involves throwing freakin’ drilling bombs down on them). But hey, the TV says it’s fine! Which it will in fact do ingame. The cutscenes are hilarious.

The Valley Rule by Raiyumi
I sincerely believe that the two creators of this game didn’t get ANY sleep, because there is no way they could’ve finished The Valley Rule otherwise. This game isn’t just the very definition of polish, it’s also incredibly big and a lot of fun! What this game lacks in innovation, it makes up in sheer production values. (And I still want the OST for it. Please.)

Behind Mirror by SaintHeiser
So, your friend just got his reflection stolen, and you want to catch the thief who is underwater. You can’t though, because your reflection is blocking you! So now your goal is to become a vampire, because well, vampires don’t have reflections, right? Combine this premise with lovely vector-art-pixel-graphics (is that a thing now?), cool music and the hardest jumps in this LD edition and you get Behind Mirror.

Rosa Neurosa by Wertle
In the words of the game’s creators, Rosa Neurosa is a “digging/mad libs/improv game.” I can’t find words for how awesome it is that they actually managed to pull of a digital single player improv game that is fun and works well, haha. Awesome graphics, great music and the option to actually share the story that you write seals the deal for me. (Try it! Post your endings here, please!)

Excellence in humor

NOPE by shadow64
I- I really, don’t know what to say about this game without spoiling anything. It’s Monty Python-esque. It’s short. It’s extremely funny. I promise you’ll like it!

Inside Look Activity Book by rylgh
The same thing applies to the Inside Look Activity Book, actually! The humor might be a biiiit more twisted and dark, but hey, it’s a book for children, right? What could possibly go wrong?

Excellence in storytelling/atmosphere

The Stanley Enigma by nddrylliog
Ah, the Stanley Enigma. You had a pretty bad dream about your friend Stanley dying, but dreams don’t come true, right? And I mean, who’d hurt Stanley anyway? Hum. Who indeed. You better check. Maybe you’ll find out in the ever branching storylines of The Stanley Enigma, a brilliant dialogue game with (as one commenter rightly remarks) Kentucky Road Zero vibes and over 1000 lines of text.

The Westport Independent by Double Zero One Zero
This game has a “Papers, Please?” vibe to me, and that’s definitely a good thing. Less good is that you’re running a newspaper which is due to be closed by an censoring antagonistic government. You’ve still got a few weeks left though – so what exactly will you print?

In Hiding by Sheepolution
Sssh. Everything will be alright. If you don’t get found, that is. Slightly scary, pretty atmospheric and the coolest effect for ingame soundeffects that I’ve ever seen.

Seven Souls by BrothersT
This is one of those games that I really want to be finished. Seven Souls is a storytelling game where you play a very nice creature which only wants to play with those other characters. Preferably in the water. No ulterior motives, I promise! A clean art style and great writing make this top list material, even if unfinished. (Also I love the accent of the creature.)

Excellence in audio

Orlok’s Ordeal by Davelope
The gameplay is fun on its own, but DAMN! This opening! Awesome voice acting combined with expressive story book pictures and dramatic music, this is just perfect. (Oh, and I love those paintings ingame. And the ending, haha.)

Ripple Runner by DDRKirby(ISQ)
A one (sorry, two. Eh, I mean three?) button runner with an innovative mechanic, game boy aesthetics and the BEST SOUNDTRACK. And the game is synchronized to it! This is just an absolutely joy to play. (And in fact, I’m listening to the soundtrack while I’m writing this list.)

Space to go by geekdrums
“Space to go” is probably the only LD game that has the complete tutorial/instructions in its title. It is storytelling synchronized to music and I can’t even describe why, but – synchronizing the words to sounds gives this whole thing an unexpectedly awesome and quite humorous feeling. It’s pretty short too, so there’s really no reason why you shouldn’t give it a try!

Excellence in being really, really different

Underworld Evolution by StudioWolfox
Underworld Evolution calls itself an “epic RTSE (Real Time Strategic Evolution) game” and it really delivers on this promise. You’re taking control of a bunch of pretty incompetent minions which you’ll slowly but surely improve – generation by generation! (Hum, maybe you shouldn’t actually play it, it’s super addictive! Don’t tell anybody, but I’ve spent over an hour on it and only stopped because I wanted to rate more games…)

Mini Metro Subway Tycoon by ripatti
A subway simulator in retro Sim City style – pretty cool. It’s a bit hard at first (I recommend watching the How To Play video), but soon you’ll be building subways like it’s nobody’s business!

You Don’t Want That by Dark Arts and Sciences
A creepypasta Ludum Dare game about making a Ludum Dare game? Sold! This is the most obscure LD game I’ve ever come across and it’s also pretty hard, but I definitely felt entertained. And I just love the idea. Don’t skip this game. It might get angry. And, uh, you don’t want that.

Generic Adventure Game by Jezzamon
As the title of the game suggests, this one is just a generic adventure game. Yup. Definitely nothing interesting here under the generic surface. (It might be pretty funny though. And have a cool concept.)

Please Come Back by PapyGaragos
This game has the greatest play-controls-avatar relationship I’ve ever encountered with a mouse. If yours has a scrollwheel, try it – you won’t be disappointed. You might get exhausted though, and the distress is pretty real too after a while. The only thing that I don’t like about this game is that it’s based on a pretty similar game, but I still think you shouldn’t skip this experience – and it’s pretty cool that it still works with such a simple art style.

 
 
Did you like my recommendations? If so, maybe you could rate and comment on my game too. I’d be really happy about that! (Although I can understand if you’re exhausted after all those other games I just suggested, haha.)
 
SnakeFormer by TobiasW
A puzzle game combining Snake with pseudo-physics platformer mechanics. It only has four levels, but it’s not actually short – level 3 and 4 are probably the hardest puzzle levels in this LD. I’m terribly, terribly sorry. (If you beat them, please tell me!)

 

Ouch!

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Sunday, April 27th, 2014 10:34 am

Turns out that lava is pretty hot.

Progress! It turns out it’s super hard for me to make interesting levels for this mechanic. Also I probably have more bugs than lava.

But then again, I guess most games here have more bugs than lava.

It’s the Snakeformer! Half Snake, Half Platformer.

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Saturday, April 26th, 2014 5:25 pm

This was not my original concept. It somehow happened! I am innocent!

The movement rules are:

  1. When the head isn’t resting on the floor or another snake part, the head will move downwards.
  2. When the snake isn’t touching the floor anywhere, the whole snake falls down.

And once more with feeling: Base Code

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Friday, April 25th, 2014 5:28 pm

Yo! Here is my Unity3D base code! (You’ll need RageSpline to use it completely.)

It does lots of cool stuff:

  • Unified button layout for XBox360 controllers on Windows (even with vibration there!) and Mac
  • Makes cool (optionally glowing) shapes (together with RageSpline)
  • Traversing spline paths (with RageSpline too)
  • Uses Scoreoid for a leaderboard
  • Basic text buttons and vanishing text for notifications
  • Easing
  • A few helpers for math, Unity and some general C# stuff

Good luck everybody!

“An Invocation for Beginnings” by zefrank

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Thursday, April 24th, 2014 5:30 pm

Since people started sharing wonderful resources on creativity, I thought I’d contribute too! For me, “An Invocation for Beginnings” by zefrank is super helpful when embarking on any creative endeavor.

It’s absolutely wonderful.

My favourite parts fitting Ludum Dare:

I’m scared. I’m scared that my abilities are gone, I’m scared that im gonna fuck this up and I’m scared of you. I don’t want to start, but I will.

[…]

Let me realize that my past failures at follow-through are no indication of my future performance. They are just healthy little fires that are gonna warm up my ass.

[…]

Perfectionism may look good in his shiny shoes, but he’s a little bit of an asshole and no one invites him to their pool parties.

[…]

Let me not think of my work only as a stepping stone to something else – and if it is, let me become fascinated with the shape of the stone. Let me take the idea that got me this far and put it to bed. What im about to do will not be that, but it will be something.

There’s no need to sharpen my pencils anymore: My pencils are sharp enough, even the dull ones will make a mark. Warts and all, lets start this shit up.

The theme is awful! Everything is ruined forever!

Posted by (twitter: @tolicious)
Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014 4:39 pm

Is that you, each time you remember what the results of the past voting rounds were?

Why are you doing this to meeeee ;__;

If so, here is a surprise for you: Your attitude is severely limiting your ability to come up with good ideas. It is much easier to have ideas when you are positive, motivated and actually give the theme a shot. If the theme is already hard for you and all you think about is “this is awful, people are stupid for voting on this” you sure aren’t making your life easier.

“But Tobias”, you say, “the theme is too limiting. Everyone will come up with the same game.” Yeah, and you probably said that everyone will do a WarioWare type of game for “10 seconds”. And how many of those did we have again? I played a hundred games and I only remember 2 of those – and a LOT of other really creative, fun and diverse games.

“But the theme is simply AWFUL. Nobody can come up with anything good for this!” Sure, except all the hundreds of people who didn’t chicken out when their favourite theme wasn’t chosen.

This is you, not even trying to jump into the water of new experiences.

So maybe this time, instead of dropping out immediately or thinking half-heartedly about the theme for half an hour to prove to yourself that you can’t come up with anything – try to keep an open mind. Maybe it won’t help, but at least this time you actually tried. And who knows, maybe you’ll come up with your best game idea yet by leaving your comfort zone! Of one thing I am sure though: You’ll become a better game designer in the process.

P.S.: And please, stop making posts complaining that people are stupid for voting in a way you don’t like. You are not a victim, so stop behaving like one.

P.P.S.: Yeah, there are themes I don’t like either. Lots of them. And I am awful at coming up with ideas. But I am trying to improve. How about you?

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