About Brassawiking

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Ludum Dare 31
 
Ludum Dare 30
 
Ludum Dare 27
 
Ludum Dare 26
 
Ludum Dare 25
 
Ludum Dare 24
 
Ludum Dare 23

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Brassawiking's Archive

Neon colors are in!

Posted by
Sunday, December 7th, 2014 7:17 am

gameplay3

I am really enjoying Ludum Dare 31, it has been a breeze making this game. Endless mode feels kinda done by now, so maybe time to squeeze in another game mode.

http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-31/?action=preview&uid=13137

First day coming to an end

Posted by
Saturday, December 6th, 2014 4:35 pm

gameplay

Some gameplay and progress after the first day. It has gone really well and I got a whole day tomorrow to add more eye candy and fun. Replacing the placeholder music is gonna be hard though. Feel free to try out and leave some feedback!

http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-31/?action=preview&uid=13137

Only two more reviews left to win!!

Posted by
Saturday, August 31st, 2013 9:07 am

Looks liked it turned into a fierce contest after all. Only two rank endings remain. That’s right folks, rank A and SS are still available. Beat the game and get the ranks and you will win a free in depth review!

Hurry up!
http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-27/?action=preview&uid=13137

freeReview

Win an in depth review!

Posted by
Saturday, August 31st, 2013 7:29 am

Here is your chance to get a free review of your game, right here on the blog. The review will be quite lengthy and focus on your entry, the progress you have made through the different Ludum Dare and what the future seems to hold for you and your game. You don’t wanna miss it!

freeReview

 

So how do you win then, you ask? Easy, you simply beat my game. But there is a catch of course. There are nine different endings of my game. Simply post the ending rank you get in the comments, and the first comment of each rank wins a review. If, however, I am a not able to play your game out of technical reasons, the winner of that rank will be the next in line.

Good luck!
http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-27/?action=preview&uid=13137

Small walkthrough added

Posted by
Tuesday, August 27th, 2013 1:58 am

So for those that played my game, I got the sense they never passed more than a F rank on the ending (which is the lowest ending hehe). So I’ve added a walkthrough so you atleast can get out alive.

1

I really hope that people will try to get all the endings. Here is really zoomed out image of the entire game. As you can see, there is a lot that can be done =)

dialogTree

http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-27/?action=preview&uid=13137

It begins…

Posted by
Saturday, August 24th, 2013 4:42 am

So now roughly 2-3 hours has passed since I started. Its going to be a point’n’click with a twist and you will have to be fast about it. Will you be able to talk yourself out from certain death?

ld27wip1

Something I have noticed in the comments to my game, was that half the people felt it didn’t fit the theme, will the other half thought it was a good match. So why is that. My main theory is because the presentation is quite elaborate. If you take a look at the full cast, there is a lack of cubes and triangles that seem to be what most of the entries consist of. Also there is a rather heavy and lengthy story involved, so everything seems to be anything BUT minimalistic.

ld26promo_by_brassawiking-d63emoh

So why should this fit the theme? It is because the minimalism lies within the actual story and elements. Everyone of them, whether it is an character or a prop, they are referred in platonic and abstract manner. Also the entire stage is more or less a a blank slate, leaving the imagination to fill in what the place actually is like.

Check it out and say what you think about it, would love some input on what people think about my intepretation of the theme.
http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-26/?action=preview&uid=13137

Also, for the first time, I managed to keep track of the number of clicks that went through my entry link. As you can see, most of the traffic comes when the judging starts. But the second spike came from when I submitted my game to a stream. Which is why I regret not fixing a 10 second clip for the compilation videos. That would most like have a great increase in traffic. So if you want exposure, do it socially. Check the frontpage and submit your game when people ask for recommendations for what to play.

stats

The Ethereal Stage – Postmortem

Posted by
Sunday, May 12th, 2013 1:59 pm

Capture

Ah, the satisfaction of doing something that actually makes you proud. I learned this the hard way, when I attempted a more complex game with Ludum Dare 25. I was not in a mood for it and already after day one, I was considering tossing the towel into the ring. But I carried on and delivered a broken prototype, that left a nasty feeling in my gut that I just wasted a weekend for nothing.

However, lessons were learned from that, and thus this time I made sure I would only make things I truly enjoy and that are focused on my strongest sets of skills. I wanted to aim for something rich in mood and story, that had a cinematic feeling to it, or as it turned out in this case, a sense of theater play. So a quick rundown of how the weekend went about.

Day 1:
Got up to read the  theme. Thought about it for a while, and the remembered an old idea that I have had before. Started setting up a base template to work upon for an hour. Then I went out into the nice sun and weather, since we were having a spring cleaning that weekend. Then in the afternoon, I started working on the game. My main goal was to set up all the game mechanics within the first day, so that the second day would be focused entirely on content, which really payed off.

Day 2:
By somewhere around afternoon I guess, all mechanics, graphics and music had been wired up. For the music, I know from previously Ludum Dare that it is not my cup of tea, so I put something together with www.jamwithchrome.com and left it at that in order to save time for creating content.So now it was time to create the actual game and storyline. It hit me as brickwall and I didn’t know where to start. Luckily I did what would turn out to be the best choice I could have made. I sat down and wrote a walkthrough.

Yes, that is correct, before the game was even made, there was a walkthrough for it. But this was going to serve as great reference when I started coding the logic for the game and knowing what would happen at every sequence. So I made a silent placeholder dialog consisting of “…” that could be invoked of every character. And I then  began to code all the logic with the goal of matching it completely with the walkthrough and all the scenes that was supposed to happen.

Having it then done, a writing marathon began, as I wrote lines of dialog for 4-6 hours straight. The code structure made it really simple to add in dialog and replace the placeholder. So it was quite a magic moment when I first played through the game, now that all the dialog had been added. It took me 20 minutes just to get through and proofread everything. So the game was more or less complete with 3 hours to go. I used another half hour or so for some final tweaking and then it was finally done and ready for the compo!

———————–

So that is how the weekend went about. Now, before I do a quick summary of what went good and what went bad, I would like to talk about a few things.

One thing that I put great emphasis on, was to make the game and story completely free of any gender and racial bias. That is, you can not tell anything about the characters besides their manners and personality. This made some of the sentences tricky, but nothing that couldn’t be worked around. Why I did this, was that I felt it was necessary in order to prevent any form of stereotypes and prejudices. Otherwise, there would be a high chance that it would have turned out a white male (as I am) or perhaps a white female. By conceling the characters, they would be guarded from any type of preconception from my side.

I also made sure to heigthen the words that was important to the game world as a way to enforce them and give them a more heavy weight to the player. By repeating them over and over in a sort of honory manner, they will eventually start to live as a higher concept. This also came about, as all the actors and probs had a static place and associated Hymn, further rooting the very nature of the game for the player.

Lastly, everything was intentionaly but in a high abstract form. My idea was that this game should be able to translate completely into a real life theater play. And thus, for example the name of the characters sounds something you would read of a theater program where they list the cast. It also gives more power to the player, as they will have to use their own imagination of what the different concepts mean and what is going on.

Capture5

So to round off this postmortem, let’s do the traditional list of good and bad.

What went good:

  • Making something that were in my right domain, focusing on my strongest skills
  • Complete game mechanics day 1, only make content and minor logic day 2
  • Having a complete design document, in my case a walkthrough. This made it possible to write all the logic without worrying how it all would fit together. Also it made me focus better, since it made me ignore any branching paths and other things that I was planning for at first.
  • Working with Html and Js, as I could find bugs and both fix them in the code and at runtime. Otherwise I would have to start all over with the playthrough every time a blocking bug showed up. Now I could just hotfix it in the DOM and Js and just carry on.
  • Using bitly to get nice statistics of how many have clicked the link to my game =)

What went bad:

  • Since I was using css3 for animations, there was some trouble timing it with the javascript. Which in turn made the pacing for the game a lot slower than it should have been. Since it was such a long game, it was hard to get the flow and pacing right, as I was mostly busy patting myself on the back for a good job this time =P
  • Did not use the remaining time to polish the game more. This includes the timing as I mentioned, but also to add some sound effects and animated movement that could have helped set the mood even more.
  • Missed putting the toggle button for the music at first, which I knew from the beginning that I should have done.

All in all, I am extremely happy with this entry. It makes me look forward to how much I can improve next time =)

Check out the game here:

http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-26/?action=preview&uid=13137

Capture5 Capture6 Capture7

Done and finished =) LD25 was a big letdown for me and I failed hard, so I made sure to enjoy every part of LD26 and only stay within my strong sides. I am speechless over how well it went. I will simply leave it at this:

Expected playthrough for this will probably be 30 minutes. That’s 30 minutes of just pure story =D

 

Oops, forgot the link to the game:

http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-26/?action=preview&uid=13137

Ethereal Stage – Day 2, twelve hours remain

Posted by
Sunday, April 28th, 2013 5:46 am

Capture3

The cast is assembled! Now what is left is just fleshing out the content =) Take a preview at my entry page.

http://www.ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-26/?action=preview&uid=13137

The Ethereal Stage – Day 1: Work in progress

Posted by
Saturday, April 27th, 2013 12:28 pm

WIP1

This time around I’m going full force on my strongest skills. Which will mainly be mood, graphics and writing. Also an experiment as it will be pure html, css3 and js. So far it has been going really good, and just finished my cutscene-pipeline.

So for those who want a sneak peak, here you go! Chrome and possible firefox will be needed for it to work. Also refresh the page a couple of times, as my preloader is not fully functional yet.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/3487858/LD26/2/index.html

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